Saturday, 30 November 2019

Slapping, Stretching & Self-Healing

Paida Lajin (拍打拉筋) Ancient Therapy
"Self-Healing" Techniques involving Slapping & Stretching
Paida involves patting ("pai" in Chinese) and slapping ("da") one's skin while Lajin involves assuming various postures to stretch one's muscles

Friday, 29 November 2019

The 15 cities with the most billionaires


If you’re searching for a city full of billionaires, look no further than New York City.

The Big Apple is where you will find the most billionaires, according to Wealth-X’s 2019 Billionaire Census. In 2018, there were 105 living in the city. And, the census states, New York City is “home to more billionaires than in almost every country in the world, with the exception of China and Germany.”

Undoubtedly the city’s status as a global financial capital attracted many of the billionaires who now call it home.

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Thursday, 28 November 2019

SIA is 2nd a Second time

Update 8 Apr 2020: SIA Plans To Raise Up To S$15B From Existing Investors To Regain Its Wings Amid COVID-19

Troubled by deepening impacts of the Covid-19 outbreak, Singapore Airlines (SIA) is just at the beginning of a heavy blow. The national carrier has suffered a 95 per cent reduction in capacity so far, which severely puts a dent in revenue, while it still has to continue incurring fixed costs like manpower and parking charges. On Monday, SIA CEO Goh Choon Pong increased the company’s cost-cutting measures, including implementing no-pay leave for staff and larger pay-cuts for management, affecting about 10,000 employees in total.

Today, the airline said it will be raising up to S$15 billion from existing investors through the sale of shares and convertible bonds, to tide through the shock from the coronavirus. This comes as SIA’s shares fell to their lowest in 22 years. The firm, on Thursday morning, halted trading before revealing this announcement. SIA will issue up to 1.77 billion new shares to existing shareholders at S$3 per share. On the basis of three rights shares for every two existing shares held by shareholders, it expects to raise S$5.3 billion. This is about a 54 per cent discount from SIA’s last traded share price of S$6.50.

Another S$9.7 billion will come from issuing mandatory 10-year convertible bonds at $1 each, on the basis of 295 bonds for every 100 existing shares owned. In the meantime, SIA has also arranged for a S$4 billion bridge loan facility with DBS. This fundraising is being underwritten by Temasek Holdings, SIA’s largest investor which owns about 55 per cent of its shares.

related: Changi Airport's T2 To Suspend Operations For 18 Months From May 1

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BEST AIRLINES 2020
AIRLINE RATINGS NAMES AIR NEW ZEALAND TOP CARRIER

The world’s best airlines for 2020 have been named by AirlineRatings.com, the world’s only safety and product rating website, and the airline of the year is Air New Zealand.


The kiwi airline just nudged out Singapore Airlines, last year’s winner, ANA, Qantas and Cathay Pacific.


Air New Zealand is being honoured for the sixth time for its record-breaking performance, multi-award-winning in-flight innovations, operational safety, environmental leadership and motivation of its staff. These factors have stamped the airline as a clear industry leader.


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World's Best Airline 2019

SINGAPORE AIRLINES DETHRONED AS WORLD’S BEST AIRLINE

Singapore Airlines just lost its “best in the world” title, with the number one spot in the prestigious Global Skytrax Rankings (the Oscars of the aviation industry) going this year to Qatar Airways.


Qatar were also awarded World’s Best Business Class (a title they’ve won every year since 2016), and Best Airline in the Middle East.


Singapore Airlines dropped to second place (which, considering the number of cashed-up competitors nipping at their heels, isn’t too bad an effort), while Japanese airline ANA All Nippon Airways came third.


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SIA slips to No. 2 in best airline list, wins top spot for its premium suites

The first class suite in the Singapore Airlines (SIA) A380. SIA snagged the Best First Class Airline accolade from AirlineRatings. ST PHOTO: LIM YAOHUI

Singapore Airlines (SIA) could not retain its crown as the best airline in 2020, slipping a spot to No. 2 behind Air New Zealand, according to airline safety and product rating review website AirlineRatings.


Even so, SIA snagged the Best First Class Airline accolade.


This is the sixth time Air New Zealand has been given the top award, with airlines assessed based on a range of factors including safety, environmental leadership and motivation of its staff.


read more


SIA Loses ‘World’s Best Airline’ To Air New Zealand, But Wins ‘Best 1st Class Airline’

SIA Wins ‘Best First Class Airline’ But No Longer ‘Best Airline’ For 2020, According To AirlineRatings

In 2019, SIA was named the World’s Best Airline in 2019 but unfortunately failed to keep its place for 2020. Instead, Air New Zealand clinched 1st place based on AirlineRating‘s criteria.


This is not Air New Zealand’s first time clinching the top award. Air New Zealand has previously won the award 5 times.


The survey, however, is a different one from the 2019 World Airline Awards that were announced earlier in June.


related: Qatar Airways Wins World’s Best Airline, SIA Wins Best Cabin Crew


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Air New Zealand named airline of the year - again

The national carrier also won the best premium economy award for the sixth year in a row. Source: Breakfast

Air New Zealand has been named airline of the year for 2020 at the Airline Excellence Awards.


It is the sixth time the national carrier has received top honours in the competition, run by AirlineRatings.com.


Aviation-experienced judges from the US, France, UK and Australia assessed airlines on 12 criteria, including customer reviews, product offerings, safety, fleet age, profitability and environmental leadership.


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Air New Zealand takes top AirlineRatings.com award

AirlineRatings.com editor Steve Creedy, left, presented the award to Air NZ chair Therese Walsh and acting chief executive Jeff McDowall. Photo / Dean Purcell

Air New Zealand has been named the airline of the year by safety and product-rating website AirlineRatings.com with the way it has responded to engine problem fallout winning praise from judges.


It is the sixth time Air New Zealand has taken the crown for what the Australian-based editors of the site said were for its multi-award-winning in-flight innovations, operational safety, environmental leadership and motivation of its staff.


''These factors have stamped the airline as a clear industry leader.''


read more


Air New Zealand has been named as the world's best airline for 2020


Air New Zealand has been named as the world's best airline for 2020 by AirlineRatings.com - a website that ranks airlines on safety and in-flight experience


The accolade was bestowed upon it for a sixth time by the Airline Excellence Awards, run by AirlineRatings.com - a website that ranks airlines on safety and in-flight experience.


It beats last year's winner, Singapore Airlines, to the top spot, while Qatar Airways is named best business class for its Qsuite and best for catering and Virgin Australia wins prizes for best economy and cabin crew.


read more


Air New Zealand named best airline for 2020

The airline also took out the award for best premium economy. Photo credit: Getty

Air New Zealand is flying high on Tuesday after being named the world's best airline for 2020.


The title was given out by Australian-based Airlinesratings.com, and sees the national carrier edge out last year's winner Singapore Airlines.


It's the sixth time Air New Zealand has won the award.


read more


SIA loses ‘airline of the year’ title to Air New Zealand, but retains best first class award


Singapore Airlines (SIA) fell to second spot after failing to retain the airline of the year title in AirlineRatings’ Airline Excellence Awards.


The world’s best airline for 2020 was awarded to Air New Zealand. This is the sixth time the airline has been given the top award. Air New Zealand also bagged the ‘Best Premium Economy’ accolade, its sixth time claiming the award.


Here are the rest of the top 20:

  • All Nippon Airways
  • Qantas
  • Cathay Pacific Airways
  • Emirates
  • Virgin Atlantic
  • EVA Air
  • Qatar Airways
  • Virgin Australia
  • Lufthansa
  • Finnair
  • Japan Airlines
  • KLM
  • Korean Airlines
  • Hawaiian Airlines
  • British Airways
  • Alaska Airlines
  • Delta Air Lines
  • Etihad Airways

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SIA slips to second place in best airline list

Each Singapore Airlines Airbus A-380 Skyroom suite resembles a small hotel room as it is equipped with a bed, an armchair and a writing table. This premium offering won the carrier the Best First Class Airline award on AirlineRatings' list.ST PHOTO: LIM YAOHUI

This is the sixth time Air New Zealand has been given the top award, with airlines assessed based on a range of factors including safety, environmental leadership and motivation of its staff.


The rest of the top 20 list comprised, in order of merit, All Nippon Airways, Qantas, Cathay Pacific Airways, Emirates, Virgin Atlantic, EVA Air, Qatar Airways, Virgin Australia, Lufthansa, Finnair, Japan Airlines, KLM, Korean Airlines, Hawaiian Airlines, British Airways, Alaska Airlines, Delta Air Lines and Etihad Airways.


Since the website started in 2013, SIA has been a familiar name on the list, finishing among the top 20 airlines every time and taking the No. 1 spot for 2019. Best Cabin Crew went to Virgin Australia, while Emirates won Best Inflight Entertainment.


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SIA apologises after flight to New Delhi delayed by almost 17 hours
Flight SQ406, scheduled to leave Changi Airport for New Delhi at 4.45pm on Nov 29, eventually took off at 9.23am the next day.ST PHOTO: LIM YAOHUI

Singapore Airlines (SIA) has released a statement on Thursday (Dec 5) apologising for a flight delay on Nov 29 which saw passengers travelling to New Delhi departing almost 17 hours after the scheduled time.

Flight SQ406, scheduled to leave Changi Airport at 4.45pm on Nov 29, eventually took off at 9.23am the next day.

The airlines said the flight was initially delayed due to bad weather here. But shortly after it left the gate at 6.05pm, the flight crew were alerted to a technical issue with the aircraft's braking system and had to return to the gate due to safety reasons.

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SIA passenger complains of “inhumane torture” over 16-hour flight delay
A passenger on Singapore Airlines (SIA) flying from Singapore to Delhi took to Facebook on Sunday (1 December) to slam the airline for its “pathetic preparedness and service” after the flight was delayed for 16 hours

Facebook user Deep Roy wrote a lengthy post on SIA’s Facebook page describing the “inhuman torture” he experienced on 29 November when the SIA flight that was due to depart from Singapore at 4.25 pm was delayed.

First, the flight was delayed for a couple of hours due to rain. Passengers had already boarded the plane at this time and were inside the cabin for more than an hour, said Mr Roy, adding that it had become “terribly hot without AC”.

Just as the plane was about to take off, the passengers were told that there was a problem with the braking mechanism. The plane headed back to the terminal where the passengers disembarked.

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SIA plane suffers damage on landing in Yangon airport after suspected tail strike

A Singapore Airlines (SIA) plane was undergoing repairs after suffering damage due to a "suspected tail strike" in Myanmar last Monday (Nov 25).

In an email to CNA on Wednesday, an SIA spokesperson said that flight SQ998 from Singapore was landing in Yangon International Airport when the incident happened. 
A tail strike is when the tail of a plane comes into contact with the runway either during takeoff or landing.

"The aircraft taxied to the terminal uneventfully and all passengers disembarked normally," said the SIA spokesperson.

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SIA plane with 284 on board hits aerobridge at Changi Airport

A Singapore Airlines (SIA) plane carrying 272 passengers and 12 crew struck an aerobridge at Changi Airport on Tuesday (Sep 18).

Singapore Airlines flight SQ178 was scheduled to depart Singapore for Ho Chi Minh City at 9.45am.

The flight was delayed after the forward fuselage of the Airbus A330-300 struck the rear aerobridge during pushback at Changi Airport, an SIA spokesperson told Channel NewsAsia.

read more

Singapore Airlines investigating allegations made by passenger on delayed flight

Singapore Airlines (SIA) on Thursday (Jun 14) said it was looking into claims that its cabin crew were rude to passengers on board a delayed flight to India.

Flight SQ516 was delayed by almost three hours last Friday due to "technical issues on the ground", said an SIA spokesperson in response to Channel NewsAsia's queries.

Facebook user Chandni Doulatramani, who was a passenger on the plane operating from Singapore to Kolkata, claimed that SIA crew members were rude to passengers when asked about the delay.

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Singapore Airlines flight to Melbourne delayed after slide 'unexpectedly deployed'

A Singapore Airlines (SIA) flight from Singapore to Melbourne was delayed after an evacuation slide was "unexpectedly deployed" on Friday (Jun 15).

Flight SQ247, a Boeing 777 operating between Singapore, Melbourne and Wellington, was being pushed back for departure from the gate at 7.45pm when the incident happened, said an SIA spokesperson in response to Channel NewsAsia's queries.

There were 243 passengers and 13 crew on board. No one was injured, the spokesperson confirmed.

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Singapore Airlines flight suffers 'hydraulic leak' during landing at Kolkata airport

A Singapore Airlines (SIA) flight from Singapore to Kolkata was stuck on the runway for a time after landing in India on Saturday (May 5) night due to a "technical fault".

Flight SQ516 landed at the Netaji Subhas Chandra Bose International Airport around 10.30pm local time on Saturday, Indian media reports said, citing an airport official.

The Airbus A330 could not be moved from the runway after touchdown for around 20 minutes.

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SIA flight from Mumbai delayed more than 8 hours over 'security concern'

Passengers on a Singapore Airlines (SIA) flight were stranded at Mumbai airport for more than eight hours after a bomb threat on Friday (Sep 7) night, according to Indian media reports.

The Hindu quoted officials as saying that the Air India call centre in Thane received a phone call about a bomb on the aircraft and passed that information on to the authorities.

After a "complete sanitation operation" by the Central Industrial Security Force team, the threat was eventually declared a hoax, the daily newspaper reported on Saturday, adding that efforts to identify the person behind the hoax call are ongoing.

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Investigations open after SIA cargo plane engine pod hits ground at Sydney Airport

An investigation has been launched by Australian authorities after a Singapore Airlines (SIA) cargo plane's engine pod struck the ground while landing at Sydney Airport.

The incident took place last Thursday (Nov 28) as the Boeing B747-400 freighter aircraft "executed a go-around due to a rejected landing", SIA said in response to CNA's queries.

"During the go-around, one of the aircraft’s engines made contact with the runway," it added.

related:
Singapore Airlines flight from Melbourne cancelled after pilot failed alcohol test
Singapore Airlines pilots not allowed to consume alcohol within 10 hours of flight
Investigation into SIA pilot who failed alcohol test, only reported case in 10 years
Scoot flight returns to Singapore after alleged bomb threat; man arrested
Bomb hoax delays Singapore Airlines flight from Taipei

read more

In 1980, Lee Kuan Yew told SIA pilots’ union he was prepared to ground airline & start over

Back in 1980, Singapore Airlines (SIA) hit a pretty rough patch and its reputation took a bad hit.

Profits were down for the airline, it had a dispute with its pilots’ union, and it was accused of shoddy treatment of its passengers affected by a strike by Australian refuellers.

Nothing seemed to be going right for SIA.

related:
SIA is 2nd a second time
World's Best Airline 2019
World's Best Airport 2018
SIA and the Peanut Allergy
SIA, in 2nd U-turn, removes auto opt-in travel insurance
‘Topping up’ mindset: Does S'pore Airlines suffer from it?
S’pore Airlines charging 1.3% credit card fees wef 20 Jan 2018
Changi Airport May Increase Fees To Build Terminal 5
Changi Airport to increase fees for departing passengers
Spate of Scoot 'flight disruptions'

Wednesday, 27 November 2019

What Breakfast Looks Like in 50 Countries

Argentina: Medialunas

Breakfast in Argentina is a no-frills affair. You’ll find locals typically eating one of two things: tostados (toast) or medialunas ("half-moons"), which are pastries similar to croissants but a smaller and sweeter. Of course, these are typically eaten with coffee.


Australia: Vegemite

Vegemite is a classic Australian product that people tend to either love or loathe. It is a thick, black spread that’s made from brewer’s yeast extract and is traditionally spread in a very thin layer over some buttered toast, sometimes accompanied with a slice of cheese. If Vegemite is too much first thing in the morning, a fry-up consisting of eggs, bacon, grilled tomatoes and mushrooms as well as some sausages, beans or hash browns is an equally Aussie breakfast to enjoy.


Bangladesh: Chapattis

In Bangladesh, wheat flour flatbreads called chapattis are frequently served for breakfast along with potato curry or scrambled eggs.

read more

Tuesday, 26 November 2019

POFMA fake news law invoked for first time


Singapore invokes 'fake news' law for first time over Facebook post
Singapore political figure Brad Bowyer. — Picture via facebook.com/SGBelieves

Singapore political figure Brad Bowyer today corrected a Facebook post questioning the independence of state investment firms following a government request, in the first use of the country's new “fake news” law.

Bowyer used “false and misleading” statements alleging the government influenced decisions made by state investors Temasek Holdings and GIC, according to a statement on the official government fact-checking website.

Bowyer said he had placed a correction notice with a link to the government statement above his Facebook post following a request to do so under the Protection from Online Falsehoods and Manipulation Act (Pofma). “I have no problem in following that request as I feel it is fair to have both points of view and clarifications and corrections of fact when necessary,” Bowyer said in a statement on Facebook.

read more

Singapore invokes ‘fake news’ law for first time over politician’s Facebook post
The correction order issued by the Singapore government is one of the tools it can deploy under the new Protection From Online Falsehoods and Manipulation Act (POFMA). Photo: Reuters

The Singapore government on Monday invoked its newly enacted anti-fake news law for the first time to demand opposition politician Brad Bowyer correct a Facebook post in which he questioned the independence of the country’s two main state investment companies.

Bowyer, of the Progress Singapore Party, later wrote that he had amended the November 13 post as he “had no problem in following that request as I feel it is fair to have both points of view and clarifications and corrections of fact when necessary”.

In a statement, the government said Heng Swee Keat, the deputy prime minister and finance minister, had issued a “correction order” to Bowyer over his post, which dwelled on GIC and Temasek Holdings – among the world’s biggest state investors.

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Singapore uses law against misinformation for first time
Singapore's law against misinformation is used for the first time, with government ordering an opposition figure to correct a Facebook post. Photo from Shutterstock.

Singapore used its law to combat misinformation for the first time Monday, November 25, ordering an opposition figure to correct a Facebook post authorities said could "smear the reputation" of state investment funds.

The legislation, which came into force last month, gives government ministers powers to order social media sites to put warnings next to posts authorities deem to be false, and in extreme cases, get them taken down. Tech giants including Google and Twitter have criticized the law, as have activists who fear it could stifle online dissent, but the government insists the measure is necessary to stop the circulation of damaging falsehoods.

Brad Bowyer, a member of opposition group Progress Singapore Party, was ordered to correct a November 13 Facebook post in which he questioned the independence of state-linked investment vehicle Temasek and sovereign wealth fund GIC.

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Singapore invokes 'fake news' law for first time over Facebook post
Rights groups fear Singapore’s fake news law will be used to curtail free speech. Photograph: Alastair Pike/AFP via Getty

A politician in Singapore has corrected a Facebook post that questioned the independence of state investment firms after a government request, in the first use of the country’s “fake news” law.

Brad Bowyer used “false and misleading” statements alleging that the government had influenced decisions made by the state investors Temasek Holdings and GIC, according to a statement on the official government factchecking website.

Bowyer said he had placed a correction notice with a link to the government statement above his Facebook post after a request to do so under the Protection from Online Falsehoods and Manipulation Act (POFMA).

read more

Use of POFMA on an online posting by Mr Brad Bowyer

In a recent Facebook post, Mr Brad Bowyer implied that the Government was involved in individual investment decisions of GIC and Temasek. He was issued with a Correction Direction under the Protection from Online Falsehoods and Manipulation (POFMA) Act on 25 November 2019.

Mr Bowyer’s post contains clearly false statements of fact, and undermines public trust in the Government.

It is necessary to state this for the record: GIC and Temasek operate on a commercial basis, and the Government is not involved in their individual investment decisions.

read more

Government uses “anti-fake news” law to eliminate public debate


Reporters Without Borders (RSF) in a statement on Friday, expressed that it is appalled by the totalitarian aspects of Singapore’s new, highly controversial “anti-fake news” law, under which the authorities issued two directives ordering “corrections” to Facebook posts within the space of a week. Below is RSF’s report and comments on the new law and the takedowns.

The “corrections” are posted on a government web page called “Factually” that was up and running as soon as the law, the Protection from Online Falsehood and Manipulation Act (POFMA), took effect in October. This page claims to present the “correct facts” as opposed to what the law calls “online falsehoods and manipulation” and displays each “corrected” item with the word “FALSE” stamped on it in large red letters.

The first directive was sent by the finance minister on 21 November to an opposition politician who had posted a note on Facebook questioning the investments made by two Singaporean sovereign wealth funds. It forced him to post a “Correction notice” at the top of his post with a link to the government web page with the “correct facts.”


Singapore uses law against misinformation
An employee of state-linked Singapore investment firm Temasek Holdings walks along the corridor of their offices in Singapore. Photo: AFP/Roslan Rahman

Singapore used its law to combat misinformation for the first time Monday, ordering an opposition figure to correct a Facebook post authorities said could “smear the reputation” of state investment funds.

The legislation, which came into force last month, gives government ministers powers to order social media sites to put warnings next to posts authorities deem to be false, and in extreme cases get them taken down.

Tech giants including Google and Twitter have criticized the law, as have activists who fear it could stifle online dissent, but the government insists the measure is necessary to stop the circulation of damaging falsehoods.

read more

Fake news law used for 1st time over PSP member's FB post
The correction direction was issued on the instruction of Finance Minister Heng Swee Keat and relates to a Facebook post made by Progress Singapore Party Member Brad Bowyer. (IMAGE: Factually microsite)

The government has invoked the Protection against Online Falsehoods and Manipulations Act (POMFA) for the first time, as the POFMA Office issued a correction notice to opposition party member Brad Bowyer.

The notice was issued on the instruction of Finance Minister Heng Swee Keat and relates to a Facebook post made by Bowyer, a Progress Singapore Party (PSP) member, on 13 November, said the POFMA Office in a statement on Tuesday (26 November).

“The Correction Direction requires Mr Bowyer to carry in full, the correction notice at the top of his Facebook post,” the statement added.

read more

Singapore invokes 'fake news' law for first time

A British-born politician in Singapore has become the first citizen requested by the government to correct a Facebook post under "fake news" legislation. The post questioned the independence of state investment firms. Brad Bowyer, a naturalized Singaporean, placed a correction notice on Monday with a link to a government statement following a request by the finance minister under the newly-created Online Falsehoods and Manipulation Act (POFMA).

The government claimed he used "false statements of fact and misleading statements," alleging the Singaporean government influenced decisions made by state investors Temasek Holdings and GIC.

Bowyer has been a member of the ruling party and opposition parties but has never stood for elected office. "In general, I caution all those who comment on our domestic politics and social issues to do so with due care and attention especially if you speak from any place of influence," Boyer said in a statement on Facebook. 

read more

First target of Singapore’s ‘fake news’ law is Facebook post that alleged a failed state investment in Salt Bae

Singapore invoked its “fake news” law for the first time Monday, making a citizen amend a Nov. 13 post that the government said used “false and misleading statements” to smear reputations.

But the first use of the law did not focus on misinformation sown by a foreign state or that aimed to provoke sectarianism in Singapore’s multiethnic state, two stated aims of the “fake news” law.

Instead, the legislation was used in response to a Facebook post from an opposition politician that accused the government of responsibility for a failing investment in Turkish restaurant chain Salt Bae.

read more

Singapore deploys ‘fake news’ law against government critic

Singapore has used its “fake news” law for the first time to force a British-born opposition party member to withdraw social media postings questioning the independence of state investment companies.

Brad Bowyer, of the Progress Singapore Party, was ordered to correct “false and misleading” statements alleging the government had influenced decisions made by state investors at Temasek Holdings and GIC. A government statement, published alongside a screenshot of Mr Bowyer’s post stamped with the word “false” in red, corrected what it said were falsehoods and accused him of seeking to “smear the reputation” of the funds.

Mr Bowyer said that he had placed a correction notice above his Facebook post after a request to do so under the Protection from Online Falsehoods and Manipulation Act.

read more

Govt invokes fake news law for first time, asks opposition member Brad Bowyer to correct Facebook post on Temasek, GIC
A screenshot of the corrections and clarifications regarding falsehoods posted by Mr Brad Bowyer on Temasek and GIC on his Facebook account. PHOTO: GOV.SG

The Protection from Online Falsehoods and Manipulation Act (Pofma) Office has issued a correction direction to Progress Singapore Party member Brad Bowyer, in the first use of a law aimed at tackling fake news.

Initiated by Minister for Finance Heng Swee Keat, the direction requires Mr Bowyer to include a correction notice at the top of one of his Facebook posts, the Pofma Office said in a statement on Monday (Nov 25).

The Pofma Office was referring to a post by Mr Bowyer on Nov 13, in which he commented on issues including the Government's involvement in investment decisions by Temasek and GIC, and Keppel Corporation's finances.

read more

Govt invokes fake-news laws for the first time, opposition member directed to carry corrections on Facebook post
The Facebook post by Mr Brad Bowyer was found to contain misleading statements

The Government has directed opposition member Brad Bowyer to correct a Facebook post which it said peddled misleading and false statements about state investor Temasek Holdings and sovereign wealth fund GIC.

In a statement on Monday (Nov 25), the Protection from Online Falsehoods and Manipulation Act (Pofma) Office said Finance Minister Heng Swee Keat had instructed the office to issue a correction directive to Mr Bowyer in relation to a Facebook post on Nov 13.

The directive requires Mr Bowyer, a member of the Progress Singapore Party, to carry in full the correction notice at the top of his Facebook post. The notice links to a statement on the Government’s Factually website, which details all the things in Mr Bowyers’ post that are untrue or misleading, and the Government’s corrections and clarifications.

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POFMA Office directs Brad Bowyer to correct Facebook post in first use of 'fake news' law
A screenshot of the Factually post citing the corrections and clarifications regarding falsehoods posted by Mr Brad Bowyer on Temasek and GIC on his Facebook account. (Image: www.gov.sg)

Opposition party member Brad Bowyer has been directed to correct a Facebook post he made earlier this month that among other things questioned the independence of Temasek and GIC, in the first use of the "fake news" law in Singapore.

"The Minister for Finance has instructed POFMA Office to issue a Correction Direction to Mr Brad Bowyer with regard to his Facebook post on 13 November 2019, 7.46am," said the POFMA Office in a news release on Monday (Nov 25).

"The Correction Direction requires Mr Bowyer to carry in full, the correction notice at the top of his Facebook post," it said.

read more

Corrections and clarifications regarding falsehoods posted by Mr Brad Bowyer
Misleading and false statements were made by Brad Bowyer on Temasek and GIC

1. The Facebook post by Mr Brad Bowyer contains false statements of fact and misleading statements.

Falsehoods

I.  Singapore Government’s involvement in investment decisions by Temasek and GIC

2. Mr Bowyer implies that the Singapore Government controls Temasek’s and GIC’s commercial decisions. This is false.

3. The Government does not influence, let alone direct, the individual investment decisions made by Temasek and GIC. Which companies they invest in, or divest from, is entirely the responsibility of their respective management teams. The Government likewise does not interfere in the commercial decisions of Temasek’s and GIC’s portfolio companies.

4. Temasek and GIC are run on market principles, independent of the Government. Many of their portfolio companies are publicly listed. The Government’s role is to ensure that Temasek and GIC have competent boards, which ensure that their respective mandates are met. The Government also holds the boards of Temasek and GIC accountable for their respective overall performances.

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Brad Bowyer 6 hrs

As many have asked for my detailed views or questioned my motives without actually reading either my original post of the factually assertion I am attaching here my notes on the “Corrections and clarifications regarding falsehoods posted by Mr Brad Bowyer” posting at the gov.sg site. I do encourage you to read both to draw your own views.

1. The Facebook post by Mr Brad Bowyer contains false statements of fact and misleading statements.

Falsehoods
I. Singapore Government’s involvement in investment decisions by Temasek and GIC
2. Mr Bowyer implies that the Singapore Government controls Temasek’s and GIC’s commercial decisions. This is false.


BPB. I do not assert this however I do suggest that they have a level of oversight. If this is not the case it would be a fair question to ask why the government does not have any oversight of Temasek or GIC as they invest public funds and have government members on their boards with the Prime Minister being the chairman of GIC and his wife as head of Temasek for example.

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Brad Bowyer 8 hrs

Today in response to a POFMA request I amended a post of mine from 13th November regarding Bharti Airtel, Salt Bae and various recent policy decisions with a correction notice which links to the government's position on statements I made in that post to their "factually" website.

I also had several media outlets reach out to me for my comment on the matter and my thoughts on POFMA in general even before I had a chance to make the correction so I thought it appropriate to issue my statement here.

I have no problem in following that request as I feel it is fair to have both points of view and clarifications and corrections of fact when necessary.

I do my best to use public facts and make informed statements of opinion based on the details I have access too.

I am not against being asked to make clarifications or corrections especially if it is in the public interest.

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Brad Bowyer 12 November at 15:46

CORRECTION NOTICE:
This post contains false statements of fact. For the correct facts, click here. www.gov.sg/…/clarifications-on-falsehoods-posted-by-mr-brad…

In my accountability speech at Hong Lim earlier in the year I mentiond Indian Telco Bharti Airtel and questions about GIC investing in it at a time when Singtel was upping its stake as the company hit cashflow issues and rating agencies had reclassified it as junk... And of course it recently got hit with a court ruling that it owes the Indian government over Sgd$17 billion in licence fees... Which financial media speculates could have a knock on effect of wiping 4 or 5% off Singtels share value.

Now we see the idiocy that was the Temasek investment in Salt Bae coming home to roost... This came to our attention in the middle of last year when somehow Temasek valued the restaurant chain at $1.2B when it made its investments. Now the debt ridden parent of the chain (and yes it was debt ridden when Temasek bought in to it) is struggling to convince anyone it is even worth $1B... So looks like a fair chunk of the $200m that Temasek put in will vaporize in less than a year.

Along with Bharti Airtel we also saw the recent canning of the Amaravati city project part of the S$4 billion already dumped into Andhra Pradesh by GLCs and related parties so India has not been so good an investment choice after all...

Salt Bae is a mess and a growing loss...

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Brad Bowyer urges citizens to use their “democratic rights”
“I’d like my country to evolve by evolution, not revolution"

On Thursday (5 December), political activist Brad Bowyer took to his Facebook to share his thoughts on how the People’s Action Party (PAP) is building more “legal walls to defend itself”.

In his post, Mr Bowyer who is currently a Progress Singapore Party member shared an article that was originally published in the Straits Times (ST) 7 years ago when he was still attached to PAP as a volunteer.

The ST article talked about why he got involved into politics and what he hoped to improve. “It gets to a point where you realise the world you live in is what you make of it. If you’ve got the ability to do something, you have a responsibility to do so.”

Brad Bowyer: Can the govt answer citizens’ questions without having to revert to POFMA

Singapore demographic data states that as of end 2018, we had 3,994,382 local residents.

Of which 3,471,936 were classified as citizens and 522,347 or just over 13% as permanent residents. That was out of a total population of 5,638,676.

To start with that made nearly 38.5% of our population foreign (it is worse now), one of the highest in the world – which on its own – brings with it many societal and cultural pressures, but today I wish to explore the question of Professionals, Managers, Executives and Technicians (PMET’s).

related: Teo Soh Lung: Who will be the next victim of POFMA?

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Singapore’s fake news law: protecting the truth, or restricting free debate?
Singapore first used the Protection from Online Falsehoods and Manipulation Act on November 25, against opposition politician Brad Bowyer. Photo: AFP

In May, as Singapore Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong’s top ministers took turns in parliament to hammer home just why they thought the country needed a new law to fight “fake news” despite reservations from activists and academics, the opposition leader rose to dampen their parade.

Workers’ Party chief Pritam Singh said his party would not back the Protection from Online Falsehoods and Manipulation Act (Pofma) over fears that it could be used as a “proverbial Damocles sword” against those who “do not support the government’s narrative or toe the government’s line”. Still, the law was easily passed because of the parliamentary supermajority held by Lee’s People’s Action Party (PAP) for decades.

K. Shanmugam, the home and law minister who vigorously campaigned to beat back local and international criticism of the law, said at the time that free speech proponents had little to worry about as Pofma only targeted “falsehoods”, “bots”, “trolls” and “fake accounts”.

related:
Singapore’s fake news law: a lesson to Asia in stifling dissent?
Spore’s opposition calls fake-news bill a ‘Damocles sword’ hanging over the public

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POFMA, a blank cheque for the government to defame?

Just last week, the Ministry of Manpower (MOM) issued three correction orders under the Protection from Online Falsehoods and Manipulation Act (POFMA), upon Singapore Democratic Party (SDP) over three online postings made by the party.

MOM claims that the posts and article from SDP contained “a misleading graphic and false statements of fact”. SDP is required to carry the correction notice at the top of both Facebook posts and the article on its website, which it has done. SDP has also followed the correction notice with a statement of its own saying that while it is complying with the order, the party will also be applying to cancel the correction direction.

The full correction by MOM is posted on the government’s fact-correction site ‘Factually’.

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Full Coverage:
Facebook Caught in Crossfire of Singapore’s ‘Fake News’ Law
Spore Gov Asks Facebook to Correct User's Post Under New Fake News Law
Blogger tests S'pore's fake news law by refusing to obey correction order
Blogger tests Spore Gov’s fake news law by rebuffing correction order
Blogger tests Singapore's fake news law by rebuffing correction order
Website editor defies order to correct Facebook post
Gov directs FB to run correction on STR post, after owner's non-compliance
STR editor refuses to obey correction order under fake news law
Singapore orders Facebook to comply with fake news law
FB instructed by POFMA Office to publish correction notice on STR's post
FB told to publish correction for STR's post after site's editor refuses to comply
PSP member in first Pofma case considering appeal
STR told to correct Facebook post under fake news law, refuses to comply
FB told to correct STR's post, Pofma Office investigating website's editor
Singapore tells Facebook to correct user’s post under new ‘fake news’ law
STR directed to correct Facebook post under online falsehoods law
POFMA Office issues correction notice to Facebook over STReview post
Singapore tells Facebook to correct post under new fake news law
Singapore tells Facebook to correct user's post in test of 'fake news' laws
Facebook Caught in Crossfire of Singapore’s ‘Fake News’ Law
Singapore blogger defies gov't order on 'fake news' correction
Facebook posts corrected under Singapore 'fake news' law
Singapore forces people to edit Facebook posts under 'fake news' law
POFMA invoked 2nd time this week—STR to correct FB post about PAP
2nd correction order issued under POFMA, this time to Alex Tan of STR
Gov directs STR correct FB post containing falsehoods; 2nd order in 4 days
Fake news law: Correction notice issued to States Times Review
Singapore tells Facebook to correct user's post under new 'fake news' law
Fake news law invoked 2nd time in 4 days, STR directed to correct FB post

ST Review told to correct FB post under fake news law,refuses to comply
States Times Review directed to correct FB post under online falsehoods law
Fake news law: Correction notice issued to States Times Review
2nd correction order issued under POFMA to Alex Tan of States Times Review
Gov directs STR correct FB post containing falsehoods;2nd order in 4 days
Factually
Facebook posts corrected under Singapore 'fake news' law
Fake news law invoked for 2nd time in 4 days,STR directed to correct FB post

STR told to correct Facebook post under fake news law,refuses to comply
Singapore uses 'fake news' law against misinformation for first time
Singapore invokes 'fake news' law for first time over Facebook post
Singapore invokes 'fake news' law for first time
Singapore invokes ‘fake news’ law for first time over Facebook post
Singapore issues first correction order under 'fake news' law

Singapore uses law against misinformation for first time
Singapore invokes 'fake news' law for first time over Facebook post
Singapore invokes 'fake news' law for first time over Facebook post
Singapore uses law against misinformation | Article
Singapore invokes fake news law for first time over Facebook post
Fake news law used for 1st time over PSP member's FB post
POFMA directs Brad Bowyer to correct FB post in 1st use of 'fake news' law
Gov invokes fake news law for 1st time, opposition Brad Bowyer to correct FB
Factually
Gov invokes fake-news laws for 1st time,opposition member directed to correct
Brad Bowyer corrects FB post on Temasek & GIC after gov invokes fake news law
Correction order issued under POFMA for statements made by politician in FB
Brad Bowyer: "When questions arise just asserting something is false


related:
Cases where POFMA has been invoked
5th case where Pofma has been invoked
First challenge against POFMA fake news law
Singapore rebuts Foreign Media on fake news law
Tis the season to be #POFMA-ed
3 Instances Of POFMA Invoked
Facebook gives way to Singapore’s ‘fake news’ law
POFMA fake news law invoked for first time
PM Lee: “POFMA would catch you!”
K Shanmugam to ‘Ah Lian’: POFMA is like a Torchlight
Singapore's fake news law passed
Singapore introduces anti-fake news law
Singapore PM sues online editor
Singapore PM threatens online editor with libel
PM Lee sues Blogger for sharing article
MDA tells The Online Citizen to register under Broadcasting Act
Mothership.sg To Register Under Broadcasting Act
Blogger asked to remove defamatory post about PM Lee
Why is Facebook in trouble?
"Can we love our Country and fear at the same time?”
The 'Dr Mahathir-Activists KL Meeting' Saga
States Times Review to shut down
Thumping of PJ Thum over ‘fake news’ hearing
Parliamentary committee on Fake News
Law to combat fake news to be introduced next year
Combating fake news in Singapore

Fakes and Frauds
Singapore public servants' computers no Internet from May 2017