15/06/2024

Land reclamation in Singapore

JTC to reclaim 44ha of land to expand Woodlands Checkpoint
JTC Corporation and the Immigration and Checkpoints Authority said about 34ha of land will be reclaimed on the western side of the Causeway linking Malaysia and Singapore, and 10ha on the eastern side

About 44ha of land will be reclaimed as part of works to expand the Woodlands Checkpoint – a smaller area than what was initially studied, so as to minimise the impact on the environment. JTC Corporation and the Immigration and Checkpoints Authority (ICA) said about 34ha of land will be reclaimed on the western side of the Causeway linking Malaysia and Singapore, and 10ha on the eastern side.

An environmental impact assessment (EIA) conducted by JTC had studied a larger reclamation area – 36.4ha on the western side and 30.2ha on the eastern end. The size of the area has been reduced to 44ha – the size of more than 60 football fields – to minimise the environmental impact of reclamation work, said the agencies in response to queries. This will also maximise the distance between the Mandai Mangrove and Mudflat nature park and reclaimed land on the western side.

Reclamation is tentatively scheduled to start in the third quarter of 2024 and slated to be completed by 2029. Works on the western side will be conducted in two phases and take about five years to complete. The smaller eastern side will take about three years and four months. The redeveloped Woodlands Checkpoint is expected to span about 95ha – almost five times the size of the current 19ha checkpoint – and aims to cut average clearance time from 60 minutes to 15 minutes during peak periods across all vehicle types, among other improvements.


Long Island to be reclaimed off East Coast could add 800ha of land, create Singapore’s 18th reservoir

Three tracts of land could be reclaimed off East Coast Park in the coming decades, creating about 800ha of land for new homes and other amenities, as well as a new reservoir.

Called the Long Island, these land tracts – collectively about twice the size of Marina Bay – are Singapore’s response to the threat of rising sea levels and inland flooding in the East Coast area.

Land in the area is largely lower than 5m above the mean sea level, the extent that sea levels are projected to rise to by the end of this century if extreme high tides coincide with storm surges.



Reclaimed from the sea: How East Coast and Marine Parade came to be
A photo taken in September 1974 showing the reclaimed land in Marine Parade and where HDB blocks had begun to spring up. PHOTO: ST FILE

Marine Parade and the East Coast area sprang up from the sea as a result of a major land reclamation project between the 1960s and 1980s. Marine Parade was the first housing estate to be built entirely on reclaimed land, and 2024 marks the 50th anniversary of the first residents moving into the estate.

In the coming decades, another reclamation project – Long Island – is planned for the south-eastern coast. When completed, the stretch of reclaimed land will protect Singapore against rising sea levels. It will have a reservoir to serve the country’s rising water demands, and space for new homes and amenities to address land needs.

The Straits Times looks back at the 20-year East Coast Reclamation Scheme, which was completed in 1985 and added 1,525ha of land and 18km of new coastline:
  • 1963 - Testing the waters. About 19ha of land – the size of about 25 football fields – is reclaimed along the Bedok coast in a pilot project.
  • 1966 to 1971 - Work begins. In Phase 1, 405ha of land stretching from Bedok to the Singapore Swimming Club in Tanjong Rhu is reclaimed.
  • 1970 and 1971 - Extending the reclaimed stretch. In Phase 2, reclamation is extended to the tip of Tanjong Rhu.
  • 1972 - First phase of East Coast Park development. The arid reclaimed shoreline slowly comes to life with plants and trees.
  • 1972 to 1976 - First HDB flats in Marine Parade. The first blocks of flats are built in Marine Parade in 1972 on land reclaimed in Phases 1 and 2. Phases 3 to 7 are carried out between 1971 and 1985. The 20-year reclamation project costs around $613 million.
  • 1981 - Completion of East Coast Parkway. The last section of East Coast Parkway between Marina Centre in Tanjong Rhu and Shenton Way opens to traffic in September 1981.
  • 1991 - Long Island first mooted. Long Island is first envisioned as a reclaimed island for beachfront housing and leisure in the Urban Redevelopment Authority’s (URA’s) 1991 Concept Plan.


More land to be reclaimed off Pulau Sudong; works will lead to loss of marine habitats
About 31.1 ha of land – the size of 43 football fields – will be reclaimed on the eastern part of the island. PHOTO: EDWIN KOO

Reclamation works are planned to begin to the east of Pulau Sudong from 2024 to upgrade its existing runway for military aircraft – a development that could result in the loss of 2ha of coral reefs, as well as seagrass habitats and swathes of mangrove forests.

To mitigate the environmental impact of the project, the authorities will relocate rare and vulnerable species, and carry out habitat restoration works once the proposed reclamation is completed by 2028, said the Housing Board on Jan 26.

About 31.1ha of land – the size of 43 football fields – will be reclaimed on the eastern part of the island, which has been gazetted for military use since the 1970s. This is so that the emergency runway can be upgraded, which will improve flight safety, especially during bad weather, HDB said in response to queries from The Straits Times.


How Singapore is creating more land for itself

Jurong Island, a man-made smear of sand, lies just off the southern coast of Singapore. A quarter the size of Nantucket, it is thoroughly given over to the petrochemical industry, so crowded with spindly cracking towers and squat oil-storage tanks that the landscape is a blur of brand names — BASF, AkzoNobel, Exxon Mobil, Vopak. One of the island’s most distinctive features, though, remains hidden: the Jurong Rock Caverns, which hold 126 million gallons of crude oil. To get there, you ride an industrial elevator more than 325 feet into the earth, and that brings you to the operations tunnel, a curving space as lofty as a cathedral. It is so long that workers get around on bicycles. Safety goggles mist up with the heat and the humidity; the rock walls, wet from dripping water, look so soft they might have been scooped out of chocolate ice cream. This is as far as anyone — even the workers — can go. The caverns themselves are an additional 100 feet beneath the ocean: two sealed cylindrical vaults, extending away from Jurong. They opened for business in 2014. Next year, three new vaults will be ready. Then, if all goes according to plan, there will be six more.

As a concept, underground reservoirs are not new. Sweden has been building them since the 1950s; a pair in the port of Gothenburg has a titanic capacity of 370 million gallons of oil. So the Jurong Rock Caverns are less an emblem of the marvels of technology than of the anxiety of a nation. Singapore is the 192nd-largest country in the world. Tinier than Tonga and just three-fifths the area of New York City, it has long fretted about its congenital puniness. “Bigger countries have the luxury of not having to think about this,” said David Tan, the assistant chief executive of a government agency called the Jurong Town Corporation, which built Jurong Island as well as the caverns. “We’ve always been acutely aware of our small size.”

The caverns were designed to free up land above ground, Tan said. I remarked that the phrase “freeing up land” occurs like clockwork in conversations with Singapore’s planners. He laughed. Land is Singapore’s most cherished resource and its dearest ambition. Since it became an independent nation 52 years ago, Singapore has, through assiduous land reclamation, grown in size by almost a quarter: to 277 square miles from 224. By 2030, the government wants Singapore to measure nearly 300 square miles.


JTC to reclaim 172ha of land in Tuas for industrial use, improved connections to Tuas Port
Reclamation works at Northern Tuas Basin are slated to begin in 2025 and end around 2029. ST FOTO: GAVIN FOO

New reclamation works are planned for Tuas, which will yield about 172ha of land for industrial use and to improve road connections to Tuas Port.

JTC Corporation, the government agency overseeing Singapore’s industrial spaces, told The Straits Times that reclamation works at Northern Tuas Basin are slated to begin in 2025 and end around 2029.

The project will “meet land demand for future industrial uses as part of ongoing plans to rejuvenate the older parts of Jurong and Tuas Industrial Estates, which were developed in the 1960s and 1970s”, the agency said in response to queries.



Singapore steps up large-scale land reclamation

Singapore is stepping up a coastal protection project coupled with the expansion of the offshore area to 800ha, which is twice the size of Marina Bay. Speaking at the East Coast Park on November 28, National Development Minister Desmond Lee announced that public agencies will carry out technical studies for the Long Island project over five years, starting from early 2024.

The current plan is for three elongated tracts of land to be reclaimed in the area, extending from Marina East to Tanah Merah. A large tidal gate and pumping station will be built in between each new land mass. These will control the water level in a new reservoir bordered by the East Coast Park and the new land masses, and, in the process, reduce flood risks in the East Coast area.

Since 2021, Singapore has launched a specific research on its coastlines. In September 2023, the country inaugurated its first research centre to enhance local capabilities and expertise in coastal protection and flood management. About 30% of Singapore's land area lies less than 5m above average sea level, including the East Coast Park - an expansive recreational area covering about 180ha that attracts 7.5 million visitors each year.


Land reclamation at Changi Bay to start by end-2022, near-threatened eagle & dugong feeding trails observed nearby

Land reclamation to extend the Changi Bay shoreline will start soon, with project works expected to commence in 2022. The project is managed by the Housing Development Board (HDB).

The Changi Bay reclamation has been alluded to in planning maps since the 2013 Land Use Plan as well as in the recent Urban Redevelopment Authority Long-Term Plan Review, where the area is designated as a "reserve site". The environmental impact assessment report for the reclamation of Changi Bay has been available for public viewing since Jul. 12, 2022.

Here are some key points from the report as seen by Mothership:
  • The project will take at least 10 years - The reclamation will extend the landmass at Changi Bay by about 4km in the southeast direction.
  • Naturalised coastal habitat - While the report also projected effects of the reclamation on nearby coastal habitats like Changi Beach to the north and Tanah Merah Ferry Terminal to the South, the main area affected is Changi Bay itself.
  • Seagrass, dugongs and other marine mammals recorded near project site - The 2021 survey looked at three patches of seagrass towards the southwest-side of Changi Bay, with the largest of them covering around 290m2 of land area.
  • "Uncommon" coral species recorded during survey - In a survey of coral habitats in and around Changi Bay, the report noted that several corals found at the rock bund at the southern end of Changi Bay and at Changi Finger are considered rare or uncommon in Singapore.
  • Turtle nesting site recorded at Changi Bay - Turtle nesting site at Changi Bay has also been recorded by NParks in December 2020, the report noted.


Singapore to reclaim land around Pedra Branca

ALL ongoing reclamation and development plans by Singapore in Batu Puteh will be temporarily halted, says Deputy Foreign Minister Datuk Mohamad Alamin. According to him, the decision by Singapore came following Malaysia’s verbal and written objections that Singapore has no right to continue planning development and reclamation works until the two countries finalise the maritime borders in those waters.

“Singapore agreed to stop all temporary plans for development and reclamation works in Batu Puteh. “Aside from determining maritime borders, negotiations to discuss Singapore’s unilateral development plans in Batu Puteh have been started by both countries,” said Mohamad during his winding-up speech on the motion of thanks for the Royal Address in Parliament. He said the Foreign Ministry and other government agencies are monitoring current developments and studying actions that can be taken based on international laws and diplomatic relations between the two countries. “As a responsible nation, Malaysia remains with the principles that this matter has to be handled diplomatically in good faith,” he added.

Prime Minister Datuk Seri Anwar Ibrahim recently said Malaysia and Singapore agreed to hold detailed negotiations on the republic’s plans to reclaim land near Batu Puteh. Anwar also said this was agreed with Singapore Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong during his recent visit to the republic last month. However, he said the decision of not appealing the International Court of Justice’s decision should be reviewed.



Long Island could create Singapore’s 18th reservoir

Three tracts of land could be reclaimed off East Coast Park in the coming decades, creating about 800ha of land for new homes and other amenities, as well as a new reservoir. Called the Long Island, these land tracts – collectively about twice the size of Marina Bay – are Singapore’s response to the threat of rising sea levels and inland flooding in the East Coast area.

Land in the area is largely lower than 5m above the mean sea level, the extent that sea levels are projected to rise to by the end of this century if extreme high tides coincide with storm surges. On Nov 28, National Development Minister Desmond Lee announced that public agencies will carry out technical studies for the Long Island project over five years, starting from early 2024. Over the next few years, members of the public will be consulted for their ideas and suggestions for the project, which will take several decades to plan, design and develop.

The current plan is for three elongated tracts of land to be reclaimed in the area, extending from Marina East to Tanah Merah. The easternmost land tract will start from Tanah Merah, while the westernmost tract will be an extension of Marina East. Between these two tracts, a third tract will be reclaimed. A large tidal gate and pumping station will be built in between each new land mass. These will control the water level in a new reservoir bordered by East Coast Park and the new land masses, and, in the process, reduce flood risks in the East Coast area.


Land reclamation in Singapore
Stamford Raffles's plan for the Town of Singapore, 1822

The reclamation of land from surrounding waters is used in Singapore to expand the city-state's limited area of usable, natural land. Land reclamation is most simply done by adding material such as rocks, soil and cement to an area of water; alternatively submerged wetlands or similar biomes can be drained. In Singapore the former has been the most common method until recently, with sand the predominant material used. Due to a global shortage and restricted supply of the required type of sand (river and beach sand, not desert sand), Singapore has switched to polders for reclamation since 2016 — a method from the Netherlands in which an area is surrounded by a dyke and pumped dry to reclaim the land.

Land reclamation allows for increased development and urbanization and in addition to Singapore has been similarly useful to Hong Kong and Macau. Each of these is a small coastal territory restrained by its geographical boundaries, and thus traditionally limited by the ocean's reach. The use of land reclamation allows these territories to expand outwards by recovering land from the sea. At just 719 km2 (278 sq mi), the entire country of Singapore is smaller than New York City. As such, the Singaporean government has used land reclamation to supplement Singapore's available commercial, residential, industrial, and governmental properties (military and official buildings). Land reclamation in Singapore also allows for the preservation of local historic and cultural communities, as building pressures are reduced by the addition of reclaimed land. Land reclamation has been used in Singapore since the early 19th century, extensively so in this last half-century in response to the city-state's rapid economic growth.

In 1960, Singapore was home to fewer than two million people; that number had more than doubled by 2008, to almost four and a half million people. To keep up with such an increase in population (as well as a concurrent surge in the country's economy and industrialization efforts), Singapore has increased its land mass by 22% since independence in 1965, with land continuously being set aside for future use. Though Singapore's native population is no longer increasing as rapidly as it was in the mid-twentieth century, the city-state has experienced a continued influx in its foreign population, resulting in a continued investment in land reclamation by the government. The government thus plans to expand the city-state by an additional 7-8% by 2030.


Reservoirs in Singapore
MacRitchie Reservoir formerly called "Thomson Road Reservoir", constructed 1890-1894 has a storage capacity of 4,200,000 cubic metres

There are a currently 17 reservoirs which are designated as national water catchment areas and are managed by the Public Utilities Board (PUB) of Singapore.

The following is a list of reservoirs in Singapore:
01 - MacRitchie Reservoir (formerly called "Thomson Road Reservoir")
02 - Lower Peirce Reservoir (formerly called "Kallang River Reservoir" & "Peirce Reservoir")
03 - Upper Seletar Reservoir (formerly called "Seletar Reservoir")

Long Island to be reclaimed off East Coast could add 800ha of land, create Singapore’s 18th reservoir

14/06/2024

17 Reservoirs in Singapore

Singapore's Reservoirs
MacRitchie Reservoir formerly called "Thomson Road Reservoir", constructed 1890-1894 has a storage capacity of 4,200,000 cubic metres

There are a currently 17 reservoirs which are designated as national water catchment areas and are managed by the Public Utilities Board (PUB) of Singapore.

The following is a list of reservoirs in Singapore:
01 - MacRitchie Reservoir (formerly called "Thomson Road Reservoir")
02 - Lower Peirce Reservoir (formerly called "Kallang River Reservoir" & "Peirce Reservoir")
03 - Upper Seletar Reservoir (formerly called "Seletar Reservoir")

Long Island to be reclaimed off East Coast could add 800ha of land, create Singapore’s 18th reservoir


Long Island could create Singapore’s 18th reservoir

Three tracts of land could be reclaimed off East Coast Park in the coming decades, creating about 800ha of land for new homes and other amenities, as well as a new reservoir. Called the Long Island, these land tracts – collectively about twice the size of Marina Bay – are Singapore’s response to the threat of rising sea levels and inland flooding in the East Coast area.

Land in the area is largely lower than 5m above the mean sea level, the extent that sea levels are projected to rise to by the end of this century if extreme high tides coincide with storm surges. On Nov 28, National Development Minister Desmond Lee announced that public agencies will carry out technical studies for the Long Island project over five years, starting from early 2024. Over the next few years, members of the public will be consulted for their ideas and suggestions for the project, which will take several decades to plan, design and develop.

The current plan is for three elongated tracts of land to be reclaimed in the area, extending from Marina East to Tanah Merah. The easternmost land tract will start from Tanah Merah, while the westernmost tract will be an extension of Marina East. Between these two tracts, a third tract will be reclaimed. A large tidal gate and pumping station will be built in between each new land mass. These will control the water level in a new reservoir bordered by East Coast Park and the new land masses, and, in the process, reduce flood risks in the East Coast area.


Singapore's four sources of water
The MacRitchie Reservoir is a popular destination for those who seek peace and quiet. ST PHOTO: KUA CHEE SIONG

Singapore has four sources of water:
  • Local catchment water involves collecting rainwater on a large scale. With the addition of the Punggol and Serangoon Reservoirs in 2011, Singapore now has a catchment area that spans two-thirds of the land surface. A catchment refers to the area from which rainfall flows into a reservoir, through a network of drains, canals, rivers and stormwater collection ponds.
  • Singapore has been importing water from Johor under two bilateral agreements, the first signed in October 1961 and expired in August 2011. Under the second agreement signed in September 1962, Singapore will receive a maximum of 250 million gallons of water a day from the Johor River until 2061.
  • Newater is high-grade reclaimed water that undergoes many rounds of treatment with advanced membrane technologies and ultra-violet disinfection until it is potable. PUB has been pumping an average of 16 mgd of Newater a day for the month of March to local reservoirs, to ensure that Singapore's water needs are met, even in the case of a water disruption.
  • Desalinated water uses reverse-osmosis to treat the water at two desalination plants. The SingSpring Desalination Plant and Tuaspring Desalination Plant can meet up to a quarter of Singapore's current water demand.


‘Water for Peace’ - World Water Day 2024 campaign launches
World Water Day is held annually on 22 March

The campaign for World Water Day, 22 March 2024, is now live. This year’s theme is ‘Water for Peace’, which focuses on the critical role water plays in the stability and prosperity of the world. When water is scarce or polluted, or when people have unequal or no access, tensions can rise between communities and countries. 

More than 3 billion people worldwide depend on water that crosses national borders. Yet, out of 153 countries that share rivers, lakes and aquifers with their neighbours, only 24 countries report having cooperation agreements for all their shared water. As climate change impacts increase, and the global population grows, we must unite around protecting and conserving our most precious resource.  By working together to balance everyone’s human rights and needs, water can be a stabilizing force and a catalyst for sustainable development. 

World Water Day is a United Nations (UN) observance coordinated by UN-Water. Every year, it raises awareness of a major water-related issue and inspires action to tackle the water and sanitation crisis. This year’s Task Force of UN-Water Members and Partners is coordinated by the UN Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE) and UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO).

13/06/2024

Shop thefts on the rise

For third year in a row, even as physical crimes dipped in 2023
Nearly 4,000 theft cases were reported at shops in Singapore last year, making up almost one-fifth of all physical crimes

The number of shoplifting cases in Singapore increased once again last year, making up the highest proportion of all reported physical crimes, according to statistics released by the Singapore Police Force (SPF) on Monday (Feb 19).

There were 3,939 cases of shop theft last year – a 21.4 per cent increase from the 3,244 cases in 2022. There were 2,652 cases in 2021 and about 2,500 cases in 2020. However, the overall number of physical crime cases in 2023 fell by 1.1 per cent - from 20,193 to 19,966. Shop theft was among the four crimes of concern flagged by the police, with the others being theft in dwelling, molestation and voyeurism. In particular, voyeurism cases – which accounted for 2.4 per cent of physical crime in 2023 – rose by 52 cases to 476.

More than two-thirds of shop theft cases happened at retail outlets like department stores, supermarkets, pharmacies and minimarts, said SPF in a press release. Items typically stolen included food and beverages, alcoholic drinks, personal care products, cosmetics, apparel and accessories. Shop theft comprised 19.7 per cent of the total physical crime cases last year.


Shop theft cases jump 25% in first half of 2023 as overall physical crime rises
Shop theft accounted for 18.1 per cent of all physical crime cases, said the police. ST PHOTO: KUA CHEE SIONG

The number of shop theft cases rose to 1,820 in the first half of 2023, with experts saying self-checkout counters could be a possible reason for the rise in such cases.

The figure rose 25.3 per cent from the 1,453 cases during the same period last year, the police revealed on Friday, in releasing the mid-year crime statistics. Overall, the total number of physical crime cases increased by 5.4 per cent to 10,080 from January to June 2023, from 9,568 in the same period last year.

Shop theft accounted for 18.1 per cent of all physical crime cases, said the police. A total of 76 per cent of the cases took place at retail chains and shops such as department stores, supermarkets, health and beauty shops, minimarts and convenience stores. Items typically stolen were food, alcoholic drinks, personal care products, clothes, accessories and cosmetics.


'Something gets stolen every week': Chinatown gift store owner puts up over 20 photos of suspected shoplifters
A gift shop in Chinatown has resorting to naming and shaming shoplifters by displaying their photos on their storefront. PHOTO: Shin Min Daily News

To deter potential shoplifters, a gift shop owner in Chinatown has resorted to naming and shaming those who nicked items from her store. The store at Trengganu Street, called Wow, recently went viral on Xiaohongshu for displaying more than 20 photos of people who allegedly stole from the shop. 

An unnamed employee at the shop told Shin Min Daily News that theft has been a persistent problem since the shop opened last November. Both tourists and locals have been caught on camera taking items without paying, she said. "Something gets stolen every week. Sometimes, it even happens twice or thrice a day. The people whose photos we publish are locals and repeat offenders," she added. 

Last month, a female tourist who looked to be in her 20s made away with a pair of glasses. She had allegedly swiped two pairs from the shelf and concealed one inside a hat near the counter. She then told the shop owner that she didn't want the second pair and left the shop with the other one. Another incident occurred during Chinese New Year. An elderly woman who was pushing a cart entered the shop around closing time.


Make-up, pens stolen as shop theft cases rise; retailer says culprits beg for mercy when caught
Suspected shoplifters caught on closed-circuit television cameras at Watsons, NTUC FairPrice, Sheng Siong, and Cold Storage from March 2023 to April 2024. PHOTOS: SINGAPORE POLICE FORCE

In 2023, staff at a clothing store in Ang Mo Kio Central saw a man in his 60s dash out of the shop with a pair of flip-flops that cost $16.90. They chased him, and when they caught him, he begged for mercy, pleading with the staff to not call the police. They let him off after he paid for the item.

The police told The Straits Times on May 18 that there were 977 shop theft cases in the first four months of 2024 – 99 more than the 878 cases in the same period in 2023. A spokesman for chain store Watsons said shop theft cases rose by 30 per cent in the first quarter of 2024 from the same period in 2023. Such cases have risen in recent years, with the figure growing by nearly 50 per cent from 2,652 cases in 2021 to 3,939 in 2023.

In its annual crime statistics released in February, the police said shop theft made up 19.7 per cent of reported physical crime cases in 2023. More than two-thirds of the cases took place at retail outlets like department stores, supermarkets, pharmacies and convenience stores. Items typically stolen included food and beverages, alcoholic drinks, personal care products, cosmetics, apparel and accessories, the police added.



Police expand programme to help retailers combat shop theft as cases rise
Deputy Commissioner of Police Lian Ghim Hua said shop theft cases rose by 12 per cent from the first half of 2021 to the same period in 2022. ST PHOTO: FELINE LIM

Amid concerns over an increase in shop theft, the police will expand a programme to help retailers fight crime. Under the Shop Theft Awareness for Retailers (Star) initiative, the police work closely with businesses to analyse ways in which their stores are vulnerable to theft and come up with countermeasures.

Speaking at the inaugural Retailers Safety and Security Symposium on Tuesday, Deputy Commissioner of Police (DCP) Lian Ghim Hua said cases of shop theft rose by 12 per cent, from 1,280 in the first half of 2021 to 1,439 in the same period in 2022. There were 2,652 cases of shop theft reported in 2021. “This uptrend is a concern and the police are committed to working closely with our partners in the retail sector to bring down the numbers,” said DCP Lian.

Launched in 2018, the Star programme now has more than 50 retailers on board, including Tangs, Watsons and Puma. It will be rolled out progressively in 2023 across all neighbourhood police centres, which will work with retailers in their areas. There are no limits on the number of retailers that can join the programme. The Star programme includes a primary survey where the police will assess whether the store has adequate security measures, such as closed-circuit television cameras. The police may also make recommendations to retailers such as keeping expensive items under lock and key.


Caught on camera: Woman steals mirror from Neil Road cafe by wrapping it in jacket
The woman removing her jacket to steal the mirror (left). The cafe showing how their mirror looked like (right). HOTO: Instagram/Thecoffeecodesingapore

With cafes having such pretty aesthetics these days, it's no wonder some customers feel the temptation to steal some of their fittings. Speaking to AsiaOne, the cafe owner of The Coffee Code Singapore, Gordon Ling, shared that his team realised that a mirror from their shop was missing on Sunday (June 9). 

"My staff opened the shop and saw that the mirror had disappeared," the 31-year-old recounted. After going through the CCTV footage, which has since been uploaded onto the cafe's Instagram stories, the team discovered that the mirror had been stolen at around 2.07am that same morning. The cafe is located at Neil Road. In the footage, a woman can be seen gesturing at someone off camera before removing her jacket. 

She then crouched down to pick up the mirror —which was displayed on the floor-with the jacket. She can then be seen sprinting away from the cafe, with another woman next to her.


MAN ARRESTED FOR SERIES OF SHOP THEFT

The Police have arrested a 29-year-old man for his suspected involvement in a series of shop theft cases. Between 22 and 25 April 2022, the Police received several reports of luxury items stolen from shops along Orchard Road. The items purportedly had an estimated total value of about $34,860.

Through ground enquires and with the aid of images from Police cameras and CCTVs, officers from Tanglin Police Division established the identity of the man and arrested him on 25 April 2022. The man will be charged in court on 27 April 2022 with theft in dwelling under Section 380 of the Penal Code 1871. The offence carries an imprisonment term that may extend to seven years and a fine.

The Police would also like to remind retailers to remain vigilant against shop thieves. Retailers are advised to adopt the following measures:
  • Ensure a good line of sight for the displays by using an appropriate shop layout;
  • Display advisory posters or signage against shop theft;
  • Display expensive merchandise in locked showcases or at prominent locations (e.g. near cashier counters);
  • Install CCTVs with recording system at the entrance/exit of the store to capture the facial features of shoppers;
  • Deploy adequate security personnel to patrol the premises in luminous vests for deterrence


Police looking for woman involved in shop theft in vicinity of Botanic Gardens

The police are looking for a woman to assist with investigations into a case of shop theft that occurred on March 4 along 1 Cluny Road.

Anyone with information is requested to call the police hotline at 1800-255- 0000 or submit information online at https://www.police.gov.sg/i-witness.

All information will be kept strictly confidential.


Police looking for man and woman involved in separate cases of shop theft at Nex

The police are looking for the two people to assist with investigations into two separate cases of shop theft reported at Nex shopping mall on May 4 and July 19.

Anyone with information is requested to call the police hotline at 1800-255-0000 or submit information online via www.police.gov.sg/iwitness.

All information will be kept strictly confidential.


Women sought by police to assist in investigations of theft at Watsons outlets around Singapore

The police are seeking the public’s assistance in their investigations of theft in dwelling at various retail chains, including Watsons, NTUC FairPrice, Sheng Siong and Cold Storage.

These cases took place between April 4, 2023 and March 15, 2024.

The individuals were captured on CCTVs are required to assist in the police investigations.


10 arrested for stealing over 90 pieces of clothing worth $6.8k from Orchard Road, HarbourFront

Seven men and three women, aged 20 to 32, have been arrested for allegedly stealing clothes worth about $6,800.

This comes after the police were alerted to a case of attempted theft along Orchard Road on October 16. The police said: "Through extensive ground enquiries and with the aid of images from police cameras and CCTV footage, officers from Tanglin and Clementi Police Division established the identities of the ten persons involved."

An operation was conducted on October 30 and the ten people were arrested for theft in dwelling with common intention in four additional cases of shop theft. More than 90 pieces of the stolen clothing, which had a total value of around $6,800, were recovered. Among the items were multiple Uniqlo shirts and women's undergarments, reported The Straits Times.


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