Thursday, 4 June 2020

Lead Healthy and Happy Lives

Health Tips to Stay Healthy and Feel Young!
It is important to keep yourself healthy, happy and independent as you age

Healthy ageing is achieving and keeping good physical and mental well-being while leading an active social life.

What Does Healthy Ageing Mean? No matter our age, we all have hopes and goals. Every one of us, regardless of our age, race, or gender, want to live a long and healthy life. There are so many things we can do today to make our tomorrows fun and fulfilling. According to the World Health Organisation, healthy ageing is defined “as the process of developing and maintaining the functional ability that enables wellbeing in older age”.

Here are a few daily health tips we can start incorporating into our lifestyle so that we can enjoy a better quality of life in our golden years:

  • Stay Physically Active
  • Eat Healthily
  • Be Smoke-free
  • Keep your mind active
  • Go for health screening
  • Manage chronic conditions well

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Wednesday, 3 June 2020

Stop Wishing, Start Doing

How can we motivate ourselves to attain a goal?

Most of us would probably like to lose a bit of weight, eat better, exercise more or get more sleep. Others may want to learn a new language or spend less at the mall. So how do we get started? In theory, the answer is simple. Just do it. Avoid junk food, eat brown rice instead of white, run 20 minutes daily and go to sleep an hour earlier instead of playing games on the phone at night. If the answer is so simple, why do many of us struggle with our goals? Why can’t we just do it? It all boils down to a lack of sufficient motivation. Motivation is an internal process where a person develops a strong reason for accomplishing something, or acting in a certain way, says Ms Michelle Tan, a Clinical Psychologist at the Institute of Mental Health (IMH).

Everyone is motivated in different ways and by different things. According to researchers, people are motivated to do something because:
  • It is fun
  • It leads to rewards
  • They want approval from others
  • They want to achieve personal goals or standards
  • It fits with their personal beliefs
“Based on these, we know that motivation can be drawn internally — setting our minds on our goals or pursuing personal growth — or through external factors,” says Ms Tan.

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Tuesday, 2 June 2020

Confusion between cotton and sheep

"CCS = Chan Chun Sing = Cotton Comes from Sheep”

Gerry Yeo 13 hrs

Walioa! That's what he said "Cotton comes from sheeps" .. Isn't he a SAF scholar?


Chan Chun Sing teased online: “CCS stands for Cotton Comes from Sheep”

2020 is proving to be quite a year for the country’s eminently quotable Trade and Industry Minister, Mr Chan Chun Sing.

From “xiasuay” (disgrace) early in the Covid-19 outbreak, when people rushed to the supermarkets, to the recent “We don’t have too many sheeps in Singapore to produce cotton”, when he spoke about face masks just before the phased end of the country’s circuit breaker from Tuesday (June 2).

People online poked fun at the minister’s latest gaffe, unearthing and sharing old videos of his remarks and actions. Mr Chan took it in stride, writing in a Facebook post on Saturday (May 30) that he also had “a good laugh” over having spoken “too fast” and clarifying, especially to “young children”  that “cotton definitely doesn’t come from sheep, it comes from cotton plants!”

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Minister Chan explains confusion between cotton and sheep as being due to the lack of sleep

In a recent media podcast, Minister for Trade and Industry Chan Chun Sing explained that “it would not be possible for Singapore to survive without trade”. “We must not forget – even to produce eggs ah, where does the egg come from? You would probably tell me hens. But where does the chicken come from? Don’t tell me eggs,” he said.

In trying to make the point that Singapore cannot survive without international trade, he made an illustration that surgical masks could not be wholly produced in Singapore because there are parts that have to be procured elsewhere, such as cotton.

Giving a sardonic snigger, he drove home the message that we “don’t have too many sheep in Singapore to produce cotton.”

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Chan Chun Sing says lack of sleep was why he blurted that cotton comes from sheep
He said, “cotton – (we) don’t have too many sheeps in Singapore

During a virtual doorstop with Minister for Trade and Industry Chan Chun Sing on labour issues over the weekend (May 30), Mr Chan blurted that cotton comes from sheep.

Mr Chan was speaking to the media on how Singapore is reliant on trade from other countries.

He added that even though Singapore can produce some things domestically such as masks, it still relies on the many natural resources from other countries.

related: CCS’s cotton & sheep brings memories of PM Lee’s “mee siam mai hum”

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It’s hair-raising and spine-chilling that our Trade and Industry Minister thinks that cotton comes from sheep

The Trade and Industry Minister was trying to make the point that Singapore cannot survive without international trade.

But he only succeeded in making us scratch our heads and wonder whether he knows that he is exposing himself to ridicule and mockery.

Chan Chun Sing was making the illustration that surgical masks could not be wholly produced in Singapore because there are parts that  have to be procured elsewhere, such as cotton. Giving a sardonic snigger, he drove home the message that we “don’t have too many sheep in Singapore to produce cotton.”

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Chan Chun Sing clarifies cotton doesn't come from sheep, probably should catch up on sleep

Minister for Trade and Industry Chan Chun Sing talked about labour issues during a virtual doorstop interview with local media on Saturday, May 30.

In it, he talked about how it is not realistic for Singaporeans to replace foreign workers in the construction industry, as Singapore's labour pool is finite.

Chan also addressed the importance of trade for Singapore's survival. Part of his interview though involved a rather interesting analogy.

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Chan Chun Sing 22 hrs

I had a good laugh too when I was told that I spoke too fast in a video interview yesterday about cotton and sheep.

To any one (especially young children) watching the video - cotton definitely doesn’t come from sheep, it comes from cotton plants! 😊

In my mind, I have been thinking for weeks of all kinds of substitutes (including wool from sheep and other animals) that we can use for the various parts of the masks that we produce here. Unfortunately in Singapore, we have neither cotton nor sheep.

Meanwhile, I should catch up on some sleep...CCS

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Singapore minister sheepishly admits woolly thinking over cotton
Singapore minister Chan Chun Sing mistakenly suggested cotton came from sheep, a gaffe which triggered bleats of mockery online

A Singaporean minister has sheepishly admitted to saying that cotton came from animals rather than plants in a slip-up during an interview that triggered bleats of mockery online. Trade and Industry Minister Chan Chun Sing made the error in a video interview on Saturday while attempting to explain tiny Singapore's reliance on foreign trade.

He gave face masks -- which are widely used in the city-state to fight the spread of the coronavirus -- as an example, suggesting there were not many components that Singapore could produce itself. "(We) don't have too many sheeps in Singapore to produce cotton," he said.

It was not Chan's first virus-related gaffe. In February was criticised over a leaked recording in which he said panic buyers were behaving like "idiots" during a closed-door meeting with members of a commerce chamber

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Singlish-slinging minister praised for calling outbreak panic buyers ‘idiots’
Just a small group behaving like idiots like that will kill all of us

Trade and Industry Minister Chan Chun Sing was being praised for his plainspoken tough talk after he apparently said “disgraceful” Singaporean panic buyers were behaving like “idiots” and threw shade at Hong Kong’s handling of the coronavirus outbreak.

His comments, made in a roughly 20-minute clip that has been spreading online this week, has gotten the attention of Singaporeans who seemed to enjoy his Singlish-steeped straight-talk and agreed with what he said. The clip was recorded in a closed-door meeting with business leaders.

“Just a small group behaving like idiots like that will kill all of us, it will kill our current price negotiation strategy, it will kill our future business strategy … I was very upset on Saturday because it has long-term implications on our international standing. Every country can behave like idiots, Singaporeans must not behave like idiots,” the voice that sounds like Chan says in the ostensibly leaked clip.

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related:
Confusion between cotton and sheep
Singlish-slinging minister praised for calling outbreak panic buyers ‘idiots’
Chan Chun Sing: "But be careful, Don't anyhow say things"
The Chan Chun Sing Puzzles
A Political Elite Class in Singapore?
Next Prime Minister “likely” to be already in the cabinet
Free the Singapore Media and Let the People Go
The People's Association is not Partisan
From Chan Khaw Teo to Vivian
From Yao Chan Chiam to Chee
Chan Chun Sing & Lee Kuan Yew