Friday, 14 July 2017

Made in China 2025 initiative


‘Made in China’ Now ‘Made by China’

From ‘Made in China’ to innovated in China, from Chinese products to Chinese brands, the Made in China 2025 plan sets ambitious targets and timelines for China’s transformation from a big manufacturing country to a strong one. The State Council released the full text of the Made in China 2025 plan on May 19, laying out a 10-year blueprint to increase China’s manufacturing competitiveness and drive economic growth as the economy slows. Previous analysis from the US-China Business Council (USCBC) indicated concerns about how Made in China 2025 would impact the competitive landscape by favoring Chinese brands over foreign competitors. Although the full policy states numerous targets and timelines, the role of foreign companies in Made in China 2025 remains unclear.

Key objectives and goals for 2025 - In addition to reemphasizing the 10 priority sectors previously identified by Premier Li Keqiang, such as next-generation information technology, aerospace and aviation, agricultural machinery, new energy vehicles, and biomedicine and high-performance medical devices, the Made in China 2025 plan also calls for increasing China’s innovation capability, quality efficiency, integration of industrialization and information technology, and green development.

These targets include:
  • Innovation  Nearly doubling research and development (R&D) expenditures as percentages of overall business revenue to boost Chinese innovation, including an effort to increase the number of valid invention patents filed by companies.
  • Quality efficiency  Increasing the industrial value-added rate by four percent from the 2015 rate in an effort to enhance both quality efficiency of Chinese manufacturing, as well as the overall technological competitiveness of the Chinese economy.
  • Smart manufacturing  Increasing the broadband penetration rate—the percentage of Internet users who have access to high-speed or broadband Internet—from 50 percent in 2015 to 82 percent by 2025, with the goal of further harmonizing the information industry with the manufacturing sector.
  • Green development  Prioritizing green development by reducing energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions. Made in China calls for industrial value-added energy consumption to be reduced by 34 percent; carbon dioxide emissions by 40 percent; and water consumption by 41 percent. The utilization rate of industrial solid waste is to be increased from 65 percent in 2015 to 79 percent by 2025.

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If you think China is good for only cheap, low quality things, you are wrong

Think about China. What are the immediate thoughts that come to mind? Cheap knock-offs of low quality? Lots of people packed in factories labouring away? That’s what will come to the minds of Singaporeans. But that is only partially true. Yes, China still produces a lot of cheap knock-offs of low quality. Yes, there are still factories where armies of people work in sweatshop-like conditions. But China is transforming at a frighteningly fast pace. Parts of China are at the forefront of Industry 4.0.

Industry 4.0 is the latest movement in the manufacturing industry. It refers to the shift from simple automated manufacturing to Artificial Intelligence (AI)-run automation, creating a “smart factory”. Also known as the Fourth Industrial Revolution, this movement relies mainly on four pillars: Cloud computing, the Internet of Things (IoT), big data analytics and machine learning systems (mechanisms controlled by digital algorithms).

In short, it is essentially the Internet of Things amplified to an Industrial scale, used to boost manufacturing efficiency, productivity and return on investment.

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Navigating the ‘Made in China 2025’ Roadmap and China’s Market Share Goals

Chinese regulators unveiled in October more detailed plans for transforming the country into an advanced manufacturing powerhouse. Released by the Leading Group for Creating a Strong Manufacturing Country, identified by the US-China Business Council (USCBC) as a high-level interagency task force created by the State Council to implement the “Made in the China 2025” initiative, the announcement forms a “key technology roadmap” for the sectors in the plan.

This roadmap identifies key sectors, production localization targets, and specific products that China hopes to produce domestically by 2025, spanning a variety of industries ranging from information technology and materials, to new energy vehicles and advanced biomedical engineering. These targets include domestic and international market share goals that USCBC members flagged due to the lack of clarity on foreign company participation and competition concerns. Notably, the roadmap includes calls for “secure and controllable,” “secure and reliable,” and “indigenous and controllable” product development in several areas, including information and communications technology equipment, but also in aerospace, rail, and new energy vehicle sectors.

A helpful USCBC chart lists the specific sectors and their localization targets in 2020 and 2025 as identified by the roadmap. How this information will fit into various Made in China Action Plans sprouting at the local level—mirroring those at the provincial level in Jiangsu, Sichuan, Hubei, Gansu, and Liaoning, and those at the municipal level like Nanjing and Beijing—and whether foreign companies will have opportunities to leverage their technology, experience, and expertise remains to be seen.

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“MADE IN CHINA 2025”: CHINA'S ANSWER TO INDUSTRY 4.0

"Made in China 2025" is an initiative to comprehensively upgrade Chinese industry and it draws direct inspiration from Germany's "Industry 4.0" plan, which was first discussed in 2011 and later adopted in 2013. The heart of the "Industry 4.0" idea is intelligent manufacturing, i.e., applying the tools of information technology to production. In the German context, this primarily means using the Internet of Things to connect small and medium-sized companies more efficiently in global production and innovation networks so that they could not only more efficiently engage in mass production but just as easily and efficiently customize products.

As China enters into the midst of the 4th Industrial Revolution, Industry 4.0, Made in China 2025 and Internet Plus have become the key economic triggers of China’s long-term economic strategy. Economists believe that the combination of these initiatives will enable a new industrial revolution. With enormous potential to capitalize on the opportunities generated through transition towards a creative and high tech driven economy, China is evolving rapidy in pursuit of its goal.

China’s population of netizens will likely exceed over 700m, yet that is barely half of China’s total population. This illustrates clearly the mega potential of e-commerce, m-commerce and other Internet based services across a broad range of sectors to capitalize on Industry 4.0 and the development of an Internet of Things (IOT).

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Made in China 2025: Leaping into the First Echelon
INTELLIGENT DESIGN: Workers test the mechanical arm of a robot in the plant of Shenyang-based Siasun Robot & Automation Co. Ltd. on October 14, 2014 (PAN YULONG)

China's manufacturing sector is in dire need of a makeover. With its economy entering the "new normal" phase, the country has to eliminate its outdated production capacity and upgrade the industrial sector. On the other hand, though dubbed a "world factory" for decades, the country is still faced with challenges from some industrial giants owing to its lack of core manufacturing technologies, low-end and low value-added industrial goods, as well as mounting production costs.

In early March, in his Government Work Report for 2015 Premier Li Keqiang disclosed China's intentions to implement the Made in China 2025 strategy, which calls for greener, more intelligent manufacturing, with a focus on quality and becoming increasingly integrated with the Internet. The move aims to lift China from its current position as a manufacturing powerhouse to a manufacturing industry world superpower.

The Made in China 2025 drive can empower the manufacturing sector and help the nation maintain economic growth at a medium-to-high level, said the State Council in a statement released after an executive meeting of the country's cabinet held on March 25.

related:
Smart Success
Manufacturing Better Outcomes

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'Made in China 2025' plan unveiled
'Made in China 2025' plan unveiled

China's State Council has unveiled a national plan, dubbed "Made in China 2025," focusing on promoting manufacturing, a notice said on Tuesday.

The plan was authorized by Premier Li Keqiang, according to the notice.
  • "Made in China 2025" is the first 10-year action plan designed to transform China from a manufacturing giant into a world manufacturing power.
  • The 10-year plan will be followed by another two plans in order to transform China into a leading manufacturing power by the year 2049, which will be the 100th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China.
  • Nine tasks have been identified as priorities: improving manufacturing innovation, integrating information technology and industry, strengthening the industrial base, fostering Chinese brands, enforcing green manufacturing, promoting breakthroughs in 10 key sectors, advancing restructuring of the manufacturing sector, promoting service-oriented manufacturing and manufacturing-related service industries, and internationalizing manufacturing.
  • The 10 key sectors are new information technology, numerical control tools and robotics, aerospace equipment, ocean engineering equipment and high-tech ships, railway equipment, energy saving and new energy vehicles, power equipment, new materials, biological medicine and medical devices, and agricultural machinery.
  • To fulfill the tasks, "Made in China 2025" will focus on five major projects, including establishing a manufacturing innovation center, said the notice.
  • To shore up the plan, China will introduce a slew of policies to deepen institutional reforms and strengthen financial support.
The implementation of the "Made in China 2025" plan will be market-oriented, though guided by the government, according to the notice.

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‘Made in China’ hi-tech plan risks pushing out foreign competitors, European businesses say

Beijing wants to improve industry’s technical prowess, but concerns raised that Chinese firms will be given advantage over competitors through support and greater market access

The European Union Chamber of Commerce in China has raised concerns about Beijing’s plans to develop the nation’s hi-tech prowess, arguing that Chinese firms will be given an unfair advantage through government support and their foreign competitors will be given limited or no access to mainland markets. The chamber’s report on the Made in China 2025 initiative was released on Tuesday and it analysed in detail 10 of the industries that Beijing hopes to boost.

The initiative was launched two years ago as part of China’s plans to become a technology superpower by 2025. The government sets out specific market share targets to be achieved by companies in key industries such as information technology and clean-energy vehicles.

related: European business group protests against cybersecurity rules that ‘penalise’ foreign firms in China

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Made in China 2025

"Made in China 2025" is an initiative to comprehensively upgrade Chinese industry. The initiative draws direct inspiration from Germany's "Industry 4.0" plan, which was first discussed in 2011 and later adopted in 2013. The heart of the "Industry 4.0" idea is intelligent manufacturing, i.e., applying the tools of information technology to production.

In the German context, this primarily means using the Internet of Things to connect small and medium-sized companies more efficiently in global production and innovation networks so that they could not only more efficiently engage in mass production but just as easily and efficiently customize products.

The Chinese effort is far broader, as the efficiency and quality of Chinese producers are highly uneven, and multiple challenges need to be overcome in a short amount of time if China is to avoid being squeezed by both newly emerging low-cost producers and more effectively cooperate and compete with advanced industrialized economies. The English translation of "中国制造2025" -- "Made in China 2025" -- does capture the goal of localization, but it misses the focus on the manufacturing qua manufacturing. The plan was drafted by the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology (MIIT) over two and a half years, with input from 150 experts from the China Academy of Engineering.

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Made in China 2025

China’s State Council announced ‘Made in China 2025’ in May 2015 as a national initiative to improve the manufacturing industry – initially up to 2025 and then on to 2035 and 2049. The goal is to transform China into a leading manufacturing power and the process has already begun – with 50 pilot projects started across China in 2015. Made in China 2025 is a report delivered by the China-Britain Business Council (CBBC) and UK Trade and Investment (UKTI) to analyse what this initiative is, and how UK companies can benefit.

China is striving to move up the value chain, to avoid being pinched at one end by lower cost countries and at the other end by higher quality manufacturers around the world. This will require a major overhaul of its enormous but plateauing manufacturing base. This presents opportunities for globally renowned UK expertise in the export of high tech equipment, technical and management consultancy services, joint R&D, design, education and skills training, and financial and professional services.

The Made in China 2025 report focuses on 10 priority sectors for China, highlighting areas of opportunity for UK companies. The sectors include advanced rail and equipment, aviation and aerospace equipment, agricultural machinery and technology, power equipment and technology, low and new-energy vehicles, new materials, high-end manufacturing control equipment and robotics, biopharmaceuticals and high-end medical equipment, advanced marine equipment and high-tech vessels, and integrated circuits and new generation information technology.

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Be afraid: China is on the path to global technology dominance
500-metre-wide radio telescope in Guizhou province that has joined the global search for extraterritorial life

I have often jested that the main difference between the United States and China is not that one is capitalist and the other communist. Rather, it is that one is run by lawyers and the other by engineers.

Nowhere is this truer than in the astonishing “catch-up” occurring on the mainland in the explosion of digital technologies and their application to the daily lives of hundreds of millions of ordinary Chinese consumers.

Ask people in the US or Europe about Chinese technology and most will still cast a dismissive smile and say China remains home of the cheap and cheerful copycat stuff that fills Walmart shelves. The dangerous naivity of this view was brought home forcefully at our APEC Business Advisory Council (ABAC) meetings last year – the first in San Francisco and the second in Shenzhen. The first thing we noticed was that our internet worked noticeably faster in Shenzhen than around San Francisco. The second was that our Chinese colleagues were paying for everything via AliPay on their smartphones.

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China's World’s Largest Telescope
An aerial view shows the Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical Telescope (FAST) in the remote Pingtang county in southwest China's Guizhou province. (Liu Xu/Xinhua/Associated Press)

The world's largest radio telescope began searching for signals from stars and galaxies and, perhaps, extraterrestrial life Sunday in a project demonstrating China's rising ambitions in space and its pursuit of international scientific prestige.

Beijing has poured billions into such ambitious scientific projects as well as its military-backed space program, which saw the launch of China's second space station earlier this month.

Measuring 500 metres in diameter, the radio telescope is nestled in a natural basin within a stunning landscape of lush green karst formations in southern Guizhou province. It took five years and $180 million US to complete and surpasses that of the 300-meter Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico, a dish used in research on stars that led to a Nobel Prize.

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MADE IN CHINA 2025: A GRAND INDUSTRIAL AMBITION

China’s State Council unveiled a 10-year grand manufacturing strategy — Made in China 2025 — in May 2015 to upgrade the nation’s manufacturing capacity. More than 20 government ministries and departments and over 150 experts from the China Academy of Engineering were involved in drafting the document.

Made in China 2025 which draws inspiration from Germany’s “Industry 4.0” is China’s first 10-year long term action plan to transform China into a world leading manufacturing power by the year 2049.

Made in China 2025 aims to inject new impetus into the manufacturing sector and in China’s overall economic and industrial restructuring to tackle the economic growth deceleration.

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China’s Great Digital Leap Forward
China’s Great Digital Leap Forward

Three distinct “spheres” — East, West, and Digital — are now said to be driving social development worldwide, according to an emerging theoretical framework which distinguishes between the three.[1] The former two overlap upon the latter, but they engage the digital sphere in different ways based on widely disparate cultural profiles. The discrete cultural spheres of East and West are rooted in their respective ideogrammatic and alphabetic writing forms, which, according to Marshall McLuhan, profoundly shape human perception of reality.

As the digital age unfolds, it does not play out the same way in societies of the East and West. While the West approaches digital life in a manner demonstrating our cultural sphere’s orientation towards individualism, fragmentation, and specialization, the East engages the cybersphere upon cultural foundations which emphasize communalism, planning, and an integral notion of social development.

Conventional wisdom tells us that the United States will long remain the world’s epicenter of high-tech development—the sunny climate, relative ethnic diversity, and lax regulatory environment of Silicon Valley providing just the right growing conditions from which innovation may sprout. This essay presents a counter narrative: As the West wanders into the digital age, driven by little beyond the most base profit-making impulses, China is leading the East into the management of the digital sphere with a highly-structured and visionary tech strategy that brings into play the strongest aspects of Chinese culture and governance, as well as the ambitions of the Communist Party of China (CPC) to achieve the nation’s “great rejuvenation” by mid-21st century. The West monetizes digital technology so as to generate profits, while China is monetizing digital modes of production with long-term national interests and goals in mind. Although many American observers remain self-assured of our nation’s economic and military preeminence, the Peoples’ Republic of China (PRC) is not only quickly bridging the digital divide; it is also mastering the complex economic and social possibilities offered by the Digital Age.

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The Changing of the Global Economic Guard
East German citizens climb the Berlin wall at the Brandenburg Gate as they celebrate the opening of the East German border on November 10, 1989.
East German citizens climb the Berlin wall at the Brandenburg Gate as they celebrate the opening of the East German border on November 10, 1989

In January 2017 the global economy changed guard. The venue was Davos, the annual gathering of the world’s wealthiest recyclers of conventional wisdom—and consistently one of the last places to anticipate what is going to happen next. This time was different. The assembled hedge-fund tycoons, Silicon Valley data executives, management gurus, and government officials were treated to a preview of how rapidly the world is about to change. Xi Jinping, the president of China, had come to the Swiss Alpine resort to defend the global trade system against the attacks of the U.S. president-elect, Donald Trump.

With minimal fanfare, the leader of the world’s largest developing economy took over the role of defending the global trading system in the teeth of protectionist war cries from the world’s most developed nation. It portended a new era in which China would apparently play the role of the responsible global citizen. The bad guys were swapping places with the good. “Some people blame economic globalization for the chaos in our world,” Xi told Davos. “We should not retreat into the harbor whenever we encounter a storm or we will never reach the other shore. … No one will emerge as a winner from a trade war.”

After more than 70 years of U.S.-led globalization, Xi’s declaration of global stewardship in the spiritual home of capitalism was an Alice in Wonderland moment. A few days later President Trump gave his by now notorious “American carnage” inaugural address. Much has changed since then. For the time being at least, Trump has dialed back his more outlandish protectionist rhetoric. A U.S.-China trade war looks less likely than it did in January. But things can change fast in Trumpland. In the space of half a day this week, Trump was reported to be considering scrapping NAFTA but then seemed to change his mind after talking to his Canadian and Mexican counterparts. Earlier in the week he slapped steep tariffs on Canadian softwood lumber imports. Even if Trump’s protectionism ceasefire with Xi sticks, that switch in roles—the changing of the global economy’s sentinel from the U.S. to China—is taking place nonetheless.

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China Is On the Path to Global Technology Dominance

There is one main difference between USA and China. China is run by engineers and USA by lawyers. That explains the great boom in technology, and the creation of new products, that adapt to the necessities of millions of Chinese consumers. In the western world, the perception of Chinese technology is cheap, and probably a copy, of other product. This is far away from reality. Internet is faster there, services like paying with your phone area a daily consumption product, and not precisely PayPal, they use AliPay.

Dolby Sound Studios is being blown away by Huawei that dedicate 40% of its staff to research and development. China will be the first country to have 5G available. Every week new technological developments are launched, and probably, they are only launched in China. For example, the first bike-sharing company was launched in Shanghai. Everything is tracked by GPS; the AliPay charges are the fastest in the world… “China’s digital payments market is today 50 times larger than that in the US.”

Furthermore, they are also at the forefront of great projects. They have the biggest telescope in the world, the faster supercomputer, and the highest development in lithium battery. They have already made a house from a 3D printer. I could be listing many more things, the list is very long. Finally, one comparison illustrate the differences between China and Western World. GoPro Karma, the best American Drone, is slower, cannot go as high, the batteries are smaller, weighed 25% more, and is more expensive, than the Mavic Pro, its Chinese brother.

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Joint efforts to implement Made in China 2025

“Made in China 2025” was first put forward by Premier Li Keqiang in his government work report in 2015, in which he urged accelerating the transformation of China from a manufacturing giant into a world manufacturing power.

The Premier has reiterated the plan on many occasions and promoted upgrades of China’s manufacturing industry. He said that China is still in the process of industrialization, which should include the manufacturing sector, but promote innovation and upgrades of the traditional manufacturing industry driven by the new economy.

The industrial innovation combined with Internet Plus, mass entrepreneurship and innovation, and “Made in China 2025” will foster a “new industrial revolution,” the Premier said.

related:
2016 a big year for mass innovation
Building a world manufacturing power
China to build 40 innovation centers by 2025

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‘Made in China 2025’ Initiative Gets New Boost
A car is assembled at the GM Shanghai Cadillac plant in Shanghai on Jan. 29, 2016. Photo: IC
A car is assembled at the GM Shanghai Cadillac plant in Shanghai on Jan. 29, 2016. Photo: IC

(Beijing) – China is stepping up financial support for the manufacturing sector as it encourages companies to upgrade their technology and tries to channel more funding away from speculative activities into the real economy.

The People’s Bank of China (PBOC), the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, and the three financial regulators who supervise banking, securities and insurance, pledged to give businesses better access to bank loans, initial public offerings, and bond issuance. They also called on insurance companies to mobilize their vast financial resources to invest in manufacturing companies, according to joint guidelines issued on Tuesday.

The co-ordinated efforts of the five government agencies to promote the Made in China 2025 strategy, an initiative launched in 2015 to upgrade Chinese industry, comes as authorities make a renewed push to boost investment in the real economy amid concerns that funds are being diverted into speculative activities that are leading to asset bubbles.

related:
Made in China 2025 strategy
Push to boost investment in the real economy

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"Made in China 2025" plan unveiled

"Made in China 2025" is the first 10-year action plan designed to transform China from a manufacturing giant into a world manufacturing power.

The 10-year plan will be followed by another two plans in order to transform China into a leading manufacturing power by the year 2049, which will be the 100th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China.

Nine tasks have been identified as priorities: improving manufacturing innovation, integrating information technology and industry, strengthening the industrial base, fostering Chinese brands, enforcing green manufacturing, promoting breakthroughs in 10 key sectors, advancing restructuring of the manufacturing sector, promoting service-oriented manufacturing and manufacturing-related service industries, and internationalizing manufacturing.

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Made in China
Zhōngguó zhìzào (Made in China) Original label

Made in China or Product of China (simplified Chinese: 中国制造; traditional Chinese: 中國製造; pinyin: Zhōngguó zhìzào,) is a country of origin label affixed to products manufactured in the People's Republic of China.

The "Made in China" brand was historically challenged by the US Cold War media campaigns that reported negatively on the brand and publicized hearings on the security of Chinese products in the United States Congress. Conversely, some advertising companies and the American Chamber of Commerce[citation needed] in Shanghai have since the late 1990s endeavored to shed the Made in China brand of its cheap image, as Made in Japan has done.

The Made in China label is the most recognizable label in the world today, due to China's rapidly developing manufacturing industry, its relatively low manufacturing wages[citation needed] and the country being the largest exporter in the world. Well-known companies include BYD, China Merchants Bank, China Pabst Blue Ribbon, Hasee, Huawei, JXD, Ping An Bank, Ping An Insurance, Shenzhen Airlines, Skyworth, TCL Corporation, Tencent, Vanke, Zhujiang Beer and Zte.

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World’s largest automated port to become operational by year end

The Yangshan Port is part of a concerted effort of backward integration with hinterland cities and towns in the prosperous Yangtze River Delta Economic Zone, which contributes about 100 million TEUs to the port, said Fang Huaijin, vice president of the Shanghai International Port Group.

A comprehensive logistic network has formed along the Yangtze River, covering 22 projects from 12 cities and regions, including Nanjing, Jiujiang, Wuhan, and Chongqing, Fang added.

The port is now seeking opportunities along the Maritime Silk Road, Fang disclosed, adding that the fourth phase of the Yangshan Deep-Water Port will serve as the gold standard for ports that want to participate in the Belt and Road Initiative.

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Full Coverage:
Be afraid: China is on the path to global technology dominance
China’s Great Digital Leap Forward
The Changing of the Global Economic Guard
Made in China 2025 strategy
Push to boost investment in the real economy
Joint efforts to implement Made in China 2025
Made in China 2025 | Center for Strategic and International Studies
'Made in China 2025' Initiative Gets New Boost - Caixin Global
'Made in China' hi-tech plan risks pushing out foreign competitors
CBBC - Made in China 2025
Marine Product Equal 9.5 Percent of GDP, Made in China 2025
Strategic Vision and Outlook of “Made in China 2025
Regulator says Made in China 2025 is fair - Chinadaily.com.cn
Made in China 2025: Chinese Manufacturing to Get a Makeover
china manufacturing 2025 - dpaq
Made in China 2025 - The State Council of the People's Republic
Made in China 2025《中国制造 2025》 - Città della Scienza
MADE IN CHINA 2025 - Mercator Institute for China Studies
MADE IN CHINA 2025 - European Strategy and Policy Analysis System
Made in China 2025 | Center for Strategic and International Studies
Made In China 2025 and New Trends of Entrepreneurship Education
MADE IN CHINA 2025: A GRAND INDUSTRIAL AMBITION
"Made in China 2025" plan unveiled - Xinhua | English.news.cn
Full Text: Report on the Work of the Government
Made in China 2025: Global Ambitions Built on Local Protections
Foreign Firms Wary Of 'Made In China 2025,' But It May Be China's
Joint efforts to implement Made in China 2025
Made in China 2025 - The State Council of the People's Republic of
made in china 2025 News - China Real Time Report - WSJ
Made In ChIna 2025 SectorS - China-Britain Business Council
'Made in China' policy boosted by manufacturing upgrade
Made in China 2025: How Beijing is revamping its manufacturing sector
Made in China 2025: Chinese Manufacturing to Get a Makeover
Made in China 2025: A New Era for Chinese Manufacturing
Regulator says Made in China 2025 is fair - Chinadaily.com.cn
Minister commits to market principles for 'Made in China 2025'
Made in China 2025 plan is similar to Germany's Industry 4.0 plan
Chengdu Becomes Pilot City for 'Made in China 2025' Initiative
China's 13th Five-Year Plan: Made in China 2025 and Industrie
Made In China 2025 & Internet Plus: The 4th Industrial Revolution
EU business group slams Beijing's 'Made in China' plan | Reuters
How the Internet of Things Can Drive Growth in China's Industries
Made In ChIna 2025 SectorS - China-Britain Business Council
'Made in China' Now 'Made by China': Update | US China Business
Made in china 2025 full text – Dishwashing service
China 2025 - Phemonoe Lab
'Made in China 2025' plan unveiled
Study on the Implementation Strategy of Liaoning Manufacturing
'Made in China' hi-tech plan risks pushing out foreign competitors
Made in China 2025: How Beijing is revamping its manufacturing sector
EU business group slams Beijing's 'Made in China' plan | Reuters
Made in China 2025 | CBBC launches major new report in Beijing and
Made in China 2025 | Center for Strategic and International Studies
“Made in China 2025”: China's answer to Industry 4.0
Navigating the 'Made in China 2025' Roadmap and China's Market
Local Made in China 2025 Plans | US China Business Council
Made in China 2025 -- Beijing Review
The EU is concerned over 'Made in China 2025' - CNBC Video
Made in China 2025: A New Era for Chinese Manufacturing
Made in China 2025: Chinese Manufacturing to Get a Makeover
'Made in China 2025' plan unveiled
Regulator says Made in China 2025 is fair - Chinadaily.com.cn
'Made in China' hi-tech plan risks pushing out foreign competitors
Made in China 2025 | EU SME Centre: China Market Research
Two Sessions: Made in China 2025 - APCO Worldwide
EU business group slams Beijing's 'Made in China' plan | Reuters
Ten Key Sectors for Priority Promotion in “Made in China 2025”
MADE IN CHINA 2025 | Hong Kong Means Business
EU business group slams Beijing's 'Made in China' plan | Reuters
Made in China 2025 | CBBC launches major new report in Beijing
Made in China 2025 | Center for Strategic and International Studies
Local Made in China 2025 Plans | US China Business Council
The EU is concerned over 'Made in China 2025'
The Chinese economy adjusts to the new normal

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All Pipes Lines Lead to China
Image result for new china myanmar oil pipeline

China has taken a firm step to beef up its energy security by inaugurating a pipeline that will bring crude oil from a deepwater port in Myanmar, along a transit route that will bypass the strategic Malacca Straits.

The first tanker that will offload 300,000 tons of oil is expected to arrive on Friday at Maday Island, a deep water port developed by China in the Bay of Bengal. From there, oil, mostly brought from West Asia and Africa, will be pumped into a 2402 kilometre long pipeline that will stretch for 771 kilometres in Myanmar and another 1631 kilometres in China. A gas pipeline, next to the Maday Island terminal, already runs from Myanmar port of Kyaukpyu. China also finalised plans to establish a rail corridor from Kyaukpyu to its Yunnan province.

The strategic oil pipeline will service China's two major growth centres Kunming and Chongqing, an industrial hub along the Yangtze River delta. Both cities are pivotal in the development of China's Silk Road Economic Belt the 21st century Maritime Silk Road.

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China unveils jet to rival Boeing and Airbus

The first Chinese-built passenger jet has taken to the skies for a politically charged maiden flight that authorities claimed would propel the country into a new era of aviation.

The C919, a twin-engine airliner designed to compete with the Airbus 320 and Boeing 737, took off from Shanghai’s Pudong International airport just after 2pm on Friday and landed back there again 80 minutes later.

The symbolic flight, which the government has celebrated as further evidence of China’s rise, was broadcast live on state-controlled television.

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The Belt And Road Initiative: A new way forward
China's president says the plan to build a modern-day Silk Road will be the 'project of the century'.
New Silk Road to be 'project of the century'

The 'Belt and Road initiative' - as it is slightly awkwardly titled - is intended to recreate the trading routes of old overland and sea through central Asia, to Europe and beyond, with massive investment in infrastructure along the way.

The ambitious plans span at least 65 countries, including more than 60 per cent of the world's population, and 30 per cent of global GDP.

The estimated $US900b ($A1.2 trillion) cost would make it one of the most expensive development projects ever attempted, and many times the size of the US Marshall Plan to rebuild Europe after the Second World War.

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Embracing, Leaning & Tilting towards China

After a series of visits by leaders of ASEAN states to China, China and ASEAN have found common agreement to prioritize economic cooperation and move forward. A golden opportunity has emerged: It is high time for China and its rival claimants in ASEAN to make major progress in the South China Sea disputes.

It's reported that officials and scholars from countries related to the South China Sea issue have met recently to discuss trust-building mechanisms, including nailing down the Code of Conduct, reshaping South China Sea order and the feasibility of joint cooperation on areas including anti-terror, climate change and protecting biodiversity.

US President-elect Trump's aggressive posturing against China has generated a lot of uncertainties in many respects, South China Sea disputes included, which have just quieted down after the tricky and stormy international arbitration process in July.

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