Sunday, 17 September 2017

Silent sit-in protest against PE2017



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Singapore Is Not Too Happy With Their Presidency Election And These Protest Photos Prove It
All photos: Sheryl Teo. Taken with permission

The following are photos from the silent #NotMyPresident protest that happened yesterday, Saturday 16 September at the Speaker’s Corner at Hong Lim Park organised by political activist Gilbert Goh.

Among the crowd of silent protestors were iconic politicians including Tan Cheng Bock, Chee Soon Juan and Jeanette Chong-Aruldoss.

Halimah Yacoob will serve as Singapore President for the next six years.

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Protest at Hong Lim Park against Elected Presidency was never about the person
Photo of Damanhuri Bin Abas - "I gripped hard the hands of Dr Tan Cheng Bock telling him how the country needed leaders with the integrity and resolute to step forward in this dark days."

The attempt to label this protest as anti-Halimah/Malay is misplaced. It was never about the person, it was about witnessing how the election process was systematically undermined, shortchanging citizen's right to vote the best independent person for the vital role of Guardian of our National reserves as well as ensuring that meritocratic credentials are safeguarded in high public offices from potential conflict of interest situations.

While at Hong Lim Park, i met young concerned and disillusioned Singaporeans who asked important questions about race, race relations, racism, politics, reform, etc. Our exchanges sitting on the grass of Hong Lim revealed some interesting insights:
  • What and who is the Malay race?
  • After 52 years, why is it that the Malay community needed this costly tokenism at the expense of our public money?
  • What do the Malay community want?
  • Why are there not many Malays at this protest event?
  • How can Singapore achieve political reform?

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Close to 2000 turn up at Hong Lim Park for protest against process of Elected Presidency

Close to 2000 individuals turned up at Hong Lim Park on 16 September to show their concern and unhappiness over the recently concluded reserved elected presidency which saw Mdm Halimah Yacob being declared President-elect as sole qualifying candidate.

While there is no speeches for the event due to National Parks Board's requirement for the organisers to apply for police permits in light of the racial content of the speeches due to the racialised elected presidency, participants of the protest event turned up to sit around or mingle around with friends, some were also spotted with placards.

The organisers had called for participants to wear black to the event to show unity as "ONE heart and people regardless of race and religion". Gilbert Goh, organiser of the event had also printed a small number of black t-shirts with the hashtag, #notmypresident and was sold out even before the event started. When asked why he did not print more, Goh said that he had wanted to print more but the supplier whom he engaged got uncomfortable with being involved in political sensitive material and declined to print more.

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Hundreds take part in silent protest against reserved election at Hong Lim Park


Dressed mostly in black, hundreds of people on Saturday (Sep 16) mounted a silent protest at Hong Lim Park against the reserved presidential election.

The protest was organised by Mr Gilbert Goh, who was clad in a black t-shirt with the words #notmypresident on it - a hashtag that some Singaporeans have used protest against not being able to vote.

President Halimah Yacob was elected unopposed on Wednesday, & inaugurated the day after.

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Singaporeans hold rare protest over presidential vote
The protest followed outrage on social media over what critics say was the engineered victory of an establishment figure

Hundreds of Singaporeans angered by the walkover victory of their first female president held a "silent sit-in" in a park Saturday in a rare political protest denouncing the lack of an election.

Halimah Yacob, a former speaker of parliament from the Malay Muslim minority, was sworn in Thursday without a vote after two potential rivals were disqualified from running.

The protest followed outrage on social media over what critics say was the engineered victory of an establishment figure.

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#Notmypresident: Singaporeans vent over voterless election
A protester covers his mouth with tape inscribed with "not my president" in Singapore on Sept. 16. (Photo by Shinya Sawai)

On the humid afternoon of Saturday, Sept. 16, several hundred Singaporeans in black T-shirts descended on a public park to demonstrate their unhappiness about the nation's first reserved presidential election.

The protest was organized by activist Gilbert Goh, who called for all citizens to show their displeasure. "It's time to unleash that frustration by showing up with like-minded Singaporeans together as one voice," he posted on Facebook.

The unhappiness arose when Singapore's election department announced this month that Halimah Yacob, a former speaker of parliament, was the sole eligible candidate who qualified for the presidency.

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Silent protest held at Hong Lim Park against reserved presidential election
A banner at a silent protest held at Hong Lim Park. (Foto: Howard Law)

A so-called 'silent protest' was held at Hong Lim Park on Saturday (Sep 16) at which people expressed dissatisfaction about the reserved presidential election.

Some of those who attended brought banners & placards with statements such as "The day democracy died" & "Robbed of an election". Some also wore badges with the words "I am against reserved PE 2017".

Empty banners were also placed on the ground & protestors scribbled phrases including "As a citizen, I was not given the right to vote".

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Singaporeans express 'sense of betrayal' after the president's swearing-in without an election
Protesters walk past a mock gravestone that reads "RIP Freedom of Speech" during a protest against new licensing regulations imposed by the government for online news sites, at Hong Lim Park in Singapore on June 8, 2013.  Credit: Edgar Su/Reuters

Hundreds of Singaporeans angered by the walkover victory of their first female president held a silent sit-in in a park Saturday in a rare political protest denouncing the lack of an election.

Halimah Yacob, a former speaker of parliament from the Malay Muslim minority, was sworn in Thursday without a vote after two potential rivals were disqualified from running.

The protest followed outrage on social media over what critics say was the engineered victory of an establishment figure.

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Singaporeans protest against uncontested presidential election

Hundreds of Singaporeans, most dressed in black, held a silent protest on Saturday against an uncontested presidential election this week in which applications from four candidates were rejected.

Political protests are rare in the wealthy city-state but the election of Halimah Yacob, a former speaker of parliament, as the country's first woman president had led to some dismay over how other prospective candidates were rejected.

"ROBBED OF AN ELECTION #NotMyPresident", read a banner at the entrance to the park where the protest was held, a venue called Speakers' Corner, which has been designated as the site in the city for people to air their views.

related: Hundreds turn up at Hong Lim for silent protest against reserved PE

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Hundreds protest against reserved Presidential Election

A silent protest against the reserved Presidential Election (PE) drew hundreds to Hong Lim Park on Saturday (Sep 16).

Among those who turned up at the “sit-in” demonstration were former presidential candidate Tan Cheng Bock, Singapore Democratic Party chief Chee Soon Juan, Singaporeans First secretary-general Tan Jee Say & blogger Han Hui Hui.

When TODAY arrived at about 4pm – half an hour before the protest’s scheduled start – participants already began trickling in, with some armed with picnic mats & placards. The crowds swelled as the evening wore on.

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Despite support of heavyweights like Tan Cheng Bock response to protest against walkover reserved presidential election was muted

Despite the support of opposition heavyweights like Dr Tan Cheng Bock, Mr Tan Jee Say and Dr Chee Soon Juan, the silent sit-in protest to express dissatisfaction with the recent events surrounding the controversial Presidential Election was muted.

This despite Dr Chee and Dr Tan informing their supporters of their intention to attend the protest beforehand, and inviting them to attend it as well.

The Straits Times reported that hundreds of people attended the event. But others like the former secretary-general of the National Solidarity Party (NSP), Lim Tean claimed that there were 2,500 – 3,000 participants. Other netizens however reported more accurately that there were only about 1,000 protesters at the silent demonstration.

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Chew Eng Ong posted a video to his Timeline. 11 hrs

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Dr Tan Cheng Bock 10 hours ago

A very warm reception at Hong Lim park.

It was a peaceful sit-in gathering at Hong Lim Park .The sit- in protest was to register Singaporeans displeasure over the walkover Presidential Election.They wanted to exercise their vote but had no chance. l was received very warmly and had many photos taken with those present.Enclose pictures of the event.

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Gilbert Goh 8 hrs

Thanks to Dr Tan Cheng Bock who graced the occasion and the thousands who attended our event this afternoon.

The conservative estimated number attending is close to about 2000 including those who leave earlier or come later.

Dr Tan stays for about an hour before leaving amidst a thunderous round of applause ....
See More

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Damanhuri Bin Abas added 3 new photos 16 September at 11:28

The attempt to label this protest as anti-Halimah/Malay is misplaced. It was never about the person, it was about witnessing how the election process was systematically undermined, shortchanging citizen's right to vote the best independent person for the vital role of Guardian of our National reserves as well as ensuring that meritocratic credentials are safeguarded in high public offices from potential conflict of interest situations.

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HuiJuan Chen shared States Times Review's post 8 hrs

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States Times Review 8 hrs

At least an estimated 3,000 Singaporeans turned up at the country's only legalised protest site Hong Lim Park today (Sep 16) to protest against the presidency see more

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Melvin Wong 6 hrs

Heng Pang 9 mins Silence is golden

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gurmit singh‏ @gurms  3 hours ago

Sizeable turnout at Silent Sit In Protest #notmypresident at Hong Lim Park #Singapore

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The Straits Times‏ @STcom 2 hours ago

Hundreds take part in silent protest against reserved election at Hong Lim Park
http://str.sg/4j5F

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Nigel Chin‏ @nigelchin 4 hours ago

Looks like there are over 200 people who have turned up at Hong Lim Park for the silent sit-in protest.

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TODAY @TODAYonline 3 hours ago

WATCH: Former presidential candidate Dr Tan Cheng Bock has arrived at a silent sit-in protest at Hong Lim Park against the reserved PE

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gurmit singh‏ @gurms 3 hours ago

Tan Cheng Bock is here. Hong Lim Park Slient Sit In Protest - #notmypresident #Singapore

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Nigel Chin‏ @nigelchin 4 hours ago

Former presidential candidate has arrived at Hong Lim Park. Has plenty of supporters here evidently.

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Beatrice Tan / 陈慧慧‏ @lovexlight 2 hours ago

Quite a lot of people showed up @ Hong Lim Park for the "sit-in protest." Pretty impressed.

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不是人‏ @gy1SqTnwNvmUAgC 3 hours ago

The #NotMyPresident crowd, staging a protest against the Government's Reserved Election. #HongLimPark

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3 ex Presidential candidates to attend reserved PE protest at Hong Lim

They are all joining Gilbert Goh as part of the protest uncles liao.

The silent protest this evening is held by Gilbert Goh, a long-time activist and organiser of many of such protests at Hong Lim Park.

Will protest turnout be larger than the first Population White Paper crowd?

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Protest the Process, Not the Person

Several to-be-participants of the sit-in protest at Hong Lim Park have issued a statement on their views on the process of the elected presidency and also their concerns over the comments made over Mdm Halimah Yacob's appointment as the Elected President being the sole candidate who received the Certificate of Eligibility from the Presidential Election Committee.
Below is their statement in full and the link for their statement:
  • On 13 September 2017, Mdm Halimah Yacob was declared Singapore’s 8th President.
  • In any other circumstance, the election of our first Malay woman President—who had also previously served as the deputy secretary-general of the National Trades Union Congress, and Speaker of Parliament, amongst other capacities—would have been celebrated as a progressive step for Singapore society.
  • However, the recent changes to the rules of the Presidential Election have generated disappointment and outrage.
  • We are aware that discontent is being expressed through a sit-in called Silent Sit-In Protest #NotMyPresident that will be held at Hong Lim Park’s Speakers’ Corner on 16 September (Saturday) at 4.30pm. This sends a clear signal that there is a significant proportion of Singaporeans who regard the so-called “hiatus-triggered model” as deeply undemocratic and politically motivated.
  • To that end, we will be attending this sit-in as an expression of sharing in the disappointment and outrage of the attendees and other Singaporeans.
  • However, we would like to clarify and urge that our disappointment and outrage should be pointed specifically to the political process and not towards Mdm Halimah Yacob’s character.
related: Dr Tan to turn up at Hong Lim silent sit-in protest, in solidarity with Sporeans

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Dr Tan Cheng Bock 11 hrs I will be there .. Silent Sit-in Protest

A Silent Sit-in protest will be held at Hong Lim Park today Saturday 16th Sep 2017, from 4.30pm to 6.30pm. l will be there.

Many Singaporeans have expressed their disappointment and anger about this Presidential Election after reading my last fb post ( which reached more than half a million people within 2 days).

While l have congratulated President Halimah Yacob on her unopposed election, like many other Singaporeans, we are disappointed that 2 other candidates with reasonable credentials were disqualified, making this 2017 PE a no contest.

It is not President Halimah as a person that Singaporeans are unhappy about. It is about the way our Government has conducted this whole walkover Presidential Election.

I share the frustrations of other Singaporeans at being deprived of voting at this EP.

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Silence Sit-in Protest - #Not My President
Dear Fellow Singaporeans

We have just received the NParks permit to stage a first-ever Silence Sit-in Protest against the Reserved Presidential Election this coming Saturday 16th Sep from 4.30 to 6.30pm.

Its a sit-in protest meaning that we won't have any speakers for the event with no stage and no microphone speaker system. You can however bring along your placards to show your displeasure with the incoming government-appointed Presidency.

If you feel dissatisfied with the recent events surrounding the controversial PE, this is the time to show up and be counted. You can continue to be a keyboard warrior quietly firing away online but the time to step up is NOW!

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Silent sit-in protest against Reserved Presidential Elections to be held on Saturday

The event will not have any speakers, and people are encouraged to simply sit down in the park as a sign of a protest against the PE. On the event’s Facebook page, Goh posted:
“Fear has crippled you all this while you are burnt up inside and its time to unlease that frustration by showing up with like-minded Singaporeans together as ONE voice.”
Participants were also told to wear black on Saturday. In fact, #NotMyPresident black tee shirts will be sold on Saturday so that participants can wear them during the sit-in protest. The hashtag had trended after the walkover was announced, when Singaporeans took it to social media to express their anger about losing their voting rights.

At the time of writing, 108 people had confirmed their attendance, while 537 people had indicted their interest in the protest.

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Protest Against Reserved Presidential Election to Go Ahead on Saturday

We have just received the NParks permit to stage a first-ever Silence Sit-in Protest against the Reserved Presidential Election this coming Saturday 16th Sep from 4.30 to 6.30pm.

Its a sit-in protest meaning that we won’t have any speakers for the event with no stage and no microphone speaker system. You can however bring along your placards to show your displeasure with the incoming government-appointed Presidency.

If you feel dissatisfied with the recent events surrounding the controversial PE, this is the time to show up and be counted. You can continue to be a keyboard warrior quietly firing away online but the time to step up is NOW!

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Hong Lim Park to protest on Saturday, Sept. 16, 2017, against reserved Presidential Election

Although it might be a little too late, Singaporeans dissatisfied with how the reserved Presidential Election 2017 panned out can still head to Hong Lim Park this Saturday, Sept. 16, 2017, to make their displeasure heard.

The protest event, “Silence Sit-in Protest – #Not My President”, which is grammatically incorrect, is organised by Hong Lim Park regular and social activist, Gilbert Goh.

Goh received approval for the event on Sept. 12, a day after new President Halimah Yacob was initially announced as the sole eligible candidate to run in this PE2017.

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Halimah Yacob will continue to live in Yishun flat
Security officers outside Halimah Yacob's home in Yishun. ST FOTO: NG SOR LUAN

President-elect Halimah Yacob will not only become Singapore's 1st woman president, but she will also be the 1st to live in a Housing Board flat during her term.

Shortly after being declared the winner in a walkover, she told reporters that she had no plans to move out of her family home in Yishun.

"I'm still staying in Yishun," said Madam Halimah Yacob, 63, when asked where she would be living after becoming president.

related: Halimah Yacob's neighbours welcome president from HDB heartland

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Security stepped up around President-elect Halimah Yacob's flat in Yishun
Residents in the area said that lots have been newly reserved for police vehicles. (Foto: Gaya Chandramohan)

Change is afoot in Yishun Ave 4, where Singapore's incoming President Halimah Yacob has lived for over 2 decades.

When Channel NewsAsia visited Madam Halimah’s HDB block on Wednesday (Sep 13) just hours after she was declared as the President-elect, there was a visible police presence.

Fresh red paint marked parking lots meant for police vehicles, & just outside her corner flat were two policemen checking on anyone who wanted to enter the area. At the block opposite, more uniformed officers were on patrol.

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A Halimah Yacob presidential residence in Yishun Ave 4 will be like this for 6 years

If you live anywhere near her, fun times to come.

There are perks and downsides to this arrangement of allowing Halimah to continue to live in Yishun — with some of these downsides downplayed.

Other than the fact that the block will become the safest place in Singapore and how all of this is so very novel, here are some other consequences of a Yishun presidential residence that have yet to be addressed:

The president’s coming and going will be scrutinised by the whole estate

The entire floor or even the whole block of residents will be ID-ed


Only one Singaporean is fit to be president

IT IS very important, Lee Hsien Loong, Singapore’s prime minister, explained last year, that all Singaporeans feel they have a genuine chance of becoming president. To that end, his government tinkered with the eligibility criteria for candidates.

Yet Singaporeans primed for a festival of inclusiveness at this year’s election must be confused. On September 11th a committee of senior officials declared that only one candidate was eligible to stand, and that the woman in question, Halimah Yacob, a former speaker of parliament, was thus deemed to have been elected unopposed. She will be sworn in on September 14th.

Popular and competent, Ms Halimah seemed very likely to win even with some competition. Disqualifying her challengers robs her of the modicum of legitimacy the election could have given her. Voters excited to mark ballots for Singapore’s first female president are particularly disappointed. Then again, Singapore’s repeated tightening of the rules suggests a lack of faith that voters, given a wider choice, would make the right decision.

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Singapore crowns president without vote

The former member of the People’s Action Party (PAP), which has dominated the tiny republic since independence, entered politics in 2001. She was elected four times.

The restricted election has been criticised. “The only beneficiaries from this reserved presidential election are Halimah Yacob and her team, as well as Singapore’s opposition, which now has a new line of attack against the PAP. The rest of Singapore has suffered,” Sudhir Vadaketh, a Singaporean commentator, told CNN.

And Hamish Brown, a long-term radio personality, posted on Facebook: “Meritocracy went out the window as soon as this presidential election was reserved for one particular ethnic race over all others.”

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Since We Couldn’t Vote In The 2017 Presidential Election, Somebody’s Created An Online Poll

After months of controversy and discussions about our races, the whole fiasco known as the 2017 Presidential Elections is finally coming to an end as President-elect Halimah Yacob prepares to begin her term on Thursday (14 Aug).

Even though we weren’t too pleased with the outcome nor did we get that public holiday, life still goes on as usual and this election will eventually be but a distant memory by next week.

So as we move on to talk about more important issues such as North Ko- what’s that? You’re saying that if there actually was an election, Halimah wouldn’t have won? You want us here at MustShareNews to write about it because you’re sure the Government only did this as they knew she would’ve lost to either Farid Khan or Salleh Marican?

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For curiosity sake. Suppose there is no walkover for the Presidential Election. Who would u hv voted for?

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PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION FIASCO IS “IRREFUTABLE PROOF” OF HOW STUPID PAP THINK S’POREANS ARE

“Singaporeans have always known that our politicians… consider themselves superior beings,” said writer Sudhir Thomas Vadaketh. “Now, with this reserved presidency, we have irrefutable proof about just how stupid they think we are.”

The farce that is the Reserved Election will, once again, prove the PAP right. Singaporeans are a stupid bunch.

They will wail and beat their chests, they may even pull their hair out and – as the Chinese would say – “cry father cry mother” when things go wrong, or when the Government does not perform to expectation. But you can also count on the same Singaporeans to timidly and unquestioningly hand over their votes to the same ruling party they complain about when the time comes, which is once every 5 years.

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Wake Up, Singapore shared Lhu Wen Kai's post 13 hrs

SPANISH TOURIST ON SINGAPORE'S PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS
(https://www.patreon.com/ownselfcheckownself)

It saddens me to see my country becoming this political Wild West where rules can be bent and exploited as per the authorities' wishes. The situation has gotten so bad that they don't even attempt to be subtle anymore.

The cynical side of me feels that while Halimah Yacob's appointment is one that primarily serves the establishment's needs, it's also disguised as a smart PR move to curry favor among Western liberal media outlets. In this age where everyone's busy singing the praises of Islam and feminism is a convenient buzzword to demonstrate self-righteousness, having a female, tudung-wearing President will a) make sites like Vox and NowThis wet, and b) outsiders think that Singapore is a progressive society, As such, it pleases me to no end that left-wing outlets have so far recognised the farcical nature of our Presidential Elections and chose not to mindlessly cover it to further their agenda.

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A doctor’s prescription on ‘who is a Malay’ could settle Halimah’s Malay credentials
To be a Malay, said Mahathir, is no more an ethnic thing as today it is more of a legal matter

Who is a Malay? The debate is still raging in Singapore with many disputing the Malay credentials of the PAP’s Presidential election’s candidate.

But a doctor’s prescription on who is a Malay in Malaysia could save Halimah Yacob the day in the court of the social-media haranguers.

The book A Doctor In The House could eventually settle the issue of ‘who is a Malay’ and could endorse Halimah’s Malay credentials

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International News Media:
The Economist: Only one Singaporean is fit to be president
Bloomberg: Singapore's First Woman President Moves Diversity Needle
Reuters: Spore names 1st woman president, raising eyebrows over election
Economic Times: Anger as Singapore gets first female president without a vote
CNN: How Singapore elected a president without a vote
Scroll.in: Singapore gets its first female president, though without an election
Mid-Day: Eyebrows raised over Singapore president election
Daily Times: Singapore gets first female president without a vote
The Hans India: Singapore gets first woman president without a vote
The Economist: Only one Singaporean is fit to be president
World Religion News: Singapore's First Female President will be Muslim
ExpressNews: Guardian: Anger in Spore after taking the first female president
Hi-tech Beacon: First Malay woman declared new president-elect of Singapore
Modern Diplomacy: Ms. Halimah Yacob – First female president of Singapore
Peace FM: 63-Yr-old Becomes Singapore's First Female President
Newsline: Halimah Yacob formally elected Singapore's first woman president
Pakistan Observer: Singapore's 1st female President sans voting
Greater Kashmir: Singapore gets its first woman Muslim president
Morocco World: Spore 1st Woman Muslim President 'Walkover' Election
Asian Herald: Indo-Malay origin Halimah becomes the 1st Woman President
Blasting News: Singapore elects its first woman president
Yahoo: PEC decision on Halimah's eligibility sparks #notmypresident hashtag
New York Times: Singapore Has a New President, No Election Needed
Gulf Times: Singapore's 'walkover' presidential election draws public criticism
Al-Arabiya: Halimah Yacob set to become Singapore's first female president
Netralnews: Singapore Sets to Inaugurate First Woman President Tomorrow
NextShark: Singapore is About to Elect Their First Female President
Vietnamplus: Former parliament speaker to become Sporean President
Coconuts: No voting required because only Halimah was certified to run
National Post: Only one candidate qualifies in Singapore presidential race
KSWeekly: Halimah Yacob Becomes Singapore's First Female President
Malaysia Chronicle: MADAM PRESIDENT IT IS FOR SINGAPORE
ASEAN Economist: Singapore crowns president without vote
Yahoo: PEC decision on Halimah's eligibility sparks #notmypresident hashtag
Connected to India: Halimah set to become Singapore's first woman President
Netralnews: Halimah to Become Spore First President from Malay Ethnic
ThePrint: Singapore to get first woman president
StepFeed: Singapore just got its 1st woman president ... and she's a hijabi
Daily News & Analysis: Halimah becomes city-state's first woman president
Daily Pakistan: Singapore set to elect first Muslim female head of state
Yahoo: I want to be a unifying force, election or no election: Halimah Yacob
Borneo Bulletin Online: Halimah set to be Singapore's first female president
Jakarta Post: Presidential candidate runs unopposed in Singapore
Free Malaysia Today: Guan Eng hails Halimah for her achievement in Spore
The Star Online: Halimah Yacob set to be next Singapore's president
Nikkei Asian Review: Singaporeans miffed by 'reserved' presidential election
Jakarta Post: Presidential candidate runs unopposed in Singapore
Yahoo: Halimah set to become Singapore's first female president

K Shanmugam Sc Like This Page · 14 September at 07:48
Malay President, Chinese Prime Minister and Indian Chief Justice

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Support and unhappiness over Elected Presidency turns into a racial mud sling like no other

Facebook post by former PAP MP, Maidin Packer on 15 September
It is truly sickening and saddening to see this whole circus turning into a racial mud sling like no other. It's purely the Malays feeling slighted cause the Majority Chinese and the minority Indians seem not to be able to accept the Madam Halimah Yacob selection because of her perceived race of being Malay. I saw such unbecoming racist comments in social media news. We are taking three steps backwards. It's a black moment for us all.

They just miss the point and turn it into a racial slur to their convenience without understanding the whole issues. It's no longer about the MALAY presidency, that majority of Singaporeans are able to accept. It's the walkover where the other contenders are denied a fight that pissed us no end and the denial to our voting rights. If Farid and Salleh Marican are fielded one of them , Indian or Malay or even Halimah will be stalled then our votes had done the talking and we will be more appeased.

So as the story goes, Singaporeans as a whole are upset with this Malay-only-qualified Presidential Election. As to add salt to our already injured wounds, the Malay is not really Malay. But then we were all hype up and was excited that well okaylah there will still be a contest. We will still be able to register our rights as voters with three Malay contenders. But lo and behold, it is a walkover and that is when the straw broke the camel's back and all hell break loose.

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Criticisms of Elected Presidency persist despite explanations and justifications

In a Today report dated 15 September 2017, it is reported that despite the fact that it was the week of firsts for Singaporean to have the first reserved election which resulted in the city state's first woman President and the first Malay Head of State in 47 years, criticism of the election process for the Elected Presidency (EP) has persisted online.

Madam Halimah Yacob, 63, was sworn in on 14 September as President. However, instead of revelling in her role on a historic occasion, she had to answer questions about how she was going to unite a country divided by her election.

The report noted that the biggest reason why the criticism arose was because Singaporeans were denied to vote as the government had disqualified two other potential candidates.

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President Halimah Yacob to move out of Yishun HDB flat due to security 'challenges'
President-elect Halimah Yacob's block in Yishun. TODAY file Foto

President Halimah Yacob will soon move out of the jumbo Yishun flat where she & her family have stayed for over 2 decades, due to challenges in ensuring her security & protection.

The Ministry of Home Affairs (MHA) said in a statement on Monday (Oct 2) that it had conducted an assessment after Madam Halimah expressed a wish to continue living in her family's Housing & Development Board (HDB) flat, which is made up of two adjacent 4-room & 5-room flats bought on the resale market.

But the security agencies found "several challenges" in ensuring the President's security in her current home, the ministry added without giving details.


A mockery of democracy in Singapore
The Speaker of Parliament Halimah Yacob joins residents of her Marsiling ward at the launch of their Orchid and Edible Gardens cum Hari Raya celebration. Photo: AFP
Meltwater, a global media monitoring house, found that 83% of social media users had a negative reaction to the election result, with only 17% positive. Singapore is one of the world’s most cyber-connected cities, with over 77% of the population active on social media

“It seems to me that the top government leaders have been going into overdrive, trying hard to convince Singaporeans that the elected presidency is an integral pillar of Singapore’s commitment to multiracialism,” said Sylvia Lim, chairman of the opposition Workers’ Party, in parliament. “The government now appears to be well-aware of the unhappiness on the ground caused by its maneuvers to install president Halimah.”

Others resented how the uncontested race perpetuated an unflattering stereotype that ethnic Malays are unable to succeed without state hand-outs and affirmative action policies. Singapore’s resident 3.9 million population, not including the expatriate population, consists of 74.3% ethnic Chinese, 13.3% ethnic Malays and 9.1% Indian, and 3.2% Eurasians and other groups, according to official census data.

Social media users questioned the three initial potential candidates self-professed ethnic origins from the Indian subcontinent, sparking the type of race-based mockery authorities have long suppressed and discouraged. Others claimed the episode revealed the PAP – which views itself as a guardian of the city-state’s delicate multiethnic balance – as playing racial politics.

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DPM Tharman ‘would have preferred a contest’ for Presidential Election
Deputy Prime Minister Tharman Shanmugaratnam said on Wednesday that he would have preferred a contest in the recent Presidential Election

Speaking at the first Majulah Lecture organised by the Nanyang Technological University on Wednesday (20 Sept), Tharman was quizzed on the 2017 Presidential Election after the lecture, according to media reports.

One student asked if the reserved presidential election is an indication that Singapore is “regressing as a society”, despite Singaporeans growing up reciting a pledge with the words “regardless of race, language or religion”.

In response, Tharman said while he was “proud” that Halimah Yacob was the first Malay president in 47 years, he told the audience of more than 1,500 it was “understandable” that Singaporeans had questions about the recent election, which was reserved for Malay candidates.

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Singapore's 8th & first woman President & first Presidential election reserved for Malays
Accordimg to a Geomancy Master, The Presidential Election polling day on Sep 23 is a special day:
  • 2 +3 = 5
  • 5 in Thai is "Ha" and in Malay is "Lima"
  • So, it is "Halima"
Hence "5 5 5" in Thai is "Ha Ha Ha"

"An Indian Muslim can be a Malay but a Malay Christian cannot be a Malay"



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