Thursday, 10 April 2014

Stomping Over STOMP

Shut down Straits Times portal petition draws support


“There are many instances online where people snap photographs of others in public spaces for the purposes of subjecting them to online ridicule and scorn,” Member of Parliament (MP), Hri Kumar Nair, said in March 2013 in Parliament.

Mr Kumar was raising the problem of online “hate speech” and “hateful ideas” and the need for privacy laws in Singapore. While Mr Kumar gave examples of a photograph of a mangled body in an accident and pictures of innocent women involved in the recent sex scandal cases being posted online, his remarks could very well have also be pointing the finger at the Straits Times’ portal, STOMP.

The acronym is short for Straits Times Online Mobile Print. Both the Straits Times and STOMP fall under the Singapore Press Holdings (SPH) umbrella.

Singapore voyeurism site STOMP faces public backlash as citizens call for its shutdown



Singapore residents appear to have had enough of STOMP, a “citizen journalism” website run by Singapore’s largest newspaper The Straits Times. A petition calling for its shutdown has recently been started and has since seen widespread support.

The petition was started on Sunday evening, April 6. As of Thursday evening, April 10, the number has swelled to 21,975 supporters, with the petition gaining momentum on social media channels and news outlets.


This discontent has been simmering over time – many netizens have voiced their outrage over the numerous gaffes and insensitive articles made by the site over the past years. The petition was started by Robin Li, who is attempting to unify opposing voices against STOMP.


Public must kick ball into MDA’s court



Over the past four days, more than 20,000 netizens signed an online petition asking for the closure of the Singapore Press Holdings web portal, STOMP. The petition was launched by one Robin Li, who cited a number of inaccuracies as one of the main reasons for STOMP to be closed down.

“STOMP has failed to rectify and set simple sensible guidelines before any irresponsible netizen contributes a fabricated story (a photoshopped picture of an NS man refusing to give up his seat to an old lady) without getting the right facts,” Li said.

One commentator, Seprahina Lum, also said: “Either investigate and publish your submissions carefully with the well-being of citizens and civil discussion in mind, or stop this misleading demented nonsense you call journalism altogether.”

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Before we stomp on STOMP

So, it’s 20,000 signatures and counting…That’s for the online petition to close down STOMP started by a Mr Robin Li.

The reason, according to the petition: STOMP publishes fabricated stories that promote cyber-bullying and unrest in the name of “citizen journalism’’. It doesn’t acknowledge mistakes and seems to lack guidelines that would screen out fabrications by contributors.

It is a worthy enough reason and one which would probably apply to countless of sites that unabashedly fabricate stuff under the guise of free speech and discussion. (What has happened to that petition to close down The Real Singapore?)

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Stomping STOMP is not the way to go

I don’t like the Straits Times Online Media Print.  STOMP calls itself “Asia’s leading citizen-journalism website with user-generated material fuelling its success”. But it is Singapore’s mainstream digital gutter tabloid — without editors, without common sense, without moderators, without quality control. STOMP is infamous for posts condemning foreigners, criticising national servicemen and police who relax in public, publicising street fights, and for failing to check fake news stories and making up fake stories.

Citizen journalism may be a decentralised mode of journalism that gives voice to the average citizen — but it is still journalism and journalism demands standards, standards which STOMP consistently fails to meet. STOMP is emblematic of many media failings more so since STOMP’s parent company, the Singapore Press Holdings, is Singapore’s largest print news company — and has very strong ties to the government. Public opinion is turning against STOMP, with a petition calling for STOMP to be shut down. As of time of writing, the petition has over 21500 supporters.

For all its failings, I think STOMP should not be shut down.

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Petition to close down SPH’s Stomp goes viral


A petition started by netizen Robin Li on petition site Change.org has gone viral. Robin Li is petitioning to close down Singapore Press Holdings’s Stomp (www.change.org/en-GB/petitions/sph-stomp-com-sg-close-down-stomp-com-sg):

Change.org is the world’s largest petition platform, empowering people to “create the change they want to see” [Link]. As of 11:30pm last night (6 Apr), there were 4,001 signatures supporting the petition. By 4pm today (7 Apr) or 16.5 hours later, some 11,612 people have signed the petition. This works out to 7,611 signatures in 16.5 hours or 7.7 signatures per minute (roughly 1 signature every 8 seconds).

Robin Li complained that some of the stories published by Stomp were fabricated. He also complained that Stomp is invading people’s privacy. “Stomp refuses to acknowledge the false stories, and chooses to go ahead and publish for the sake of ‘citizen journalism’,” he said. 

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Close down STOMP.com.sg


Netizens have been contributing fabricated stories in the expense of other citizens, picking on national service men, promotes cyber-bullying and cause unrest among fellow citizens by invading their privacy.

Stomp refuses to acknowledge the false stories, and chooses to go ahead and publish for the sake of "citizen journalism"

How does this educate generations after generations when there are much important news that netizens can find time to understand rather than spending hours on STOMP just reading and contributing fabricated stories? STOMP has failed to rectify and set simple sensible guidelines before any irresponsible netizen contributes a fabricated story without getting the right facts. 

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Straits Times portal’s inaccurate report about NSman on train


From reporting a false story in 2012, to its xenophobic reports in 2013, the Straits Times’ portal – STOMP – now looks to cast aspersions on our NSmen with an inaccurate and unfair report.

On 24 March, STOMP published a submission by a “stomper” accusing an NSman of not giving up his seat to an elderly woman.

The report, published in its column titled “Hey Goondus”, was headlined: “Elderly woman stands right in front of him on MRT, but NSman simply acts blur”.

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STOMP RE-PUBLISHES FAKE NEWS, GETS TROLLED BY NEW NATION

Are STOMP administrators retarded? Or North Korean?

Ladies and gentlemen, it’s about time this had to happen! Singapore Press Holdings owned STOMP, that nincompoop website that promotes voyeurism, tries to pass off New Nation‘s 50% real news as the truth!

Check out this screen shot of STOMP‘s article:

This piece is stolen from New Nation without even giving any credit! (Is Alex Tan working at STOMP now?)

Check out the original article here. Therefore, we can only conclude, STOMP is run by North Koreans.

Maybe we should email Warren Fernandez about this? 

related:


STOMP

What is “citizen journalism”? In Singapore, that's STOMP. A website run by Singapore’s largest newspaper, The Straits Times, STOMP is a website which allows normal Singaporeans to contribute stories.

Now, I read that many Singaporeans are against the website with an online petition calling for its shutdown. The petition has been gaining momentum on social media and has currently 8,013 supporters. The main complain they have seems to be fabricated content posted by contributors to the STOMP website.

Now I'm not a big fan of STOMP but I don't get this petition at all. Yes, there's wrong stories posted there but there's wrong things posted on Wikipedia also and I do see any online petition to shut that down. I mean that's what you're going to get if you allow anyone to post things online. I post anything I want on my blog and though I try, I'm sure I got things wrong before. It comes with the territory when you do things as a hobby (even if it's a serious hobby) with no editor hovering above you. 

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Radio DJ apologises for Facebook post


A MEDIACORP Lush 99.5FM DJ apologised yesterday for a controversial Facebook post in which he called for Singaporeans to be killed. Mr Chris Ho commented on an army recruitment advertisement on the social media platform on Thursday.

The campaign, launched last December, bears the slogan: "How far would you go to protect our home?"vThe Singaporean wrote in response: "How far...? Let's see... I'm with you foreigners! Kill the **** Singaporeans but not my friends, can?

His comment caused fury among netizens and was reposted on citizen journalism portal Stomp.

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Editor-in-chief apologises to SMRT over Stomp picture

The photograph that a content producer of citizen journalism website Stomp posted online, supposedly of an MRT train running with one set of its doors open, has been found to be false.

On discovering this, Mr Patrick Daniel, editor-in-chief of Singapore Press Holdings' English and Malay Newspapers Division, sent a letter on Sunday to Mr Tan Ek Kia, the interim chief executive of rail operator SMRT, apologising for the incident.vThe content producer, Ms Samantha Francis, was also sacked by SPH, which owns Stomp, on the same day.

The 23-year-old had initially claimed that she took the photograph at Lakeside MRT station last Tuesday night. But following investigations by SPH, she eventually admitted that she had taken the image from a post on social networking site Twitter. The original tweet has since been removed.

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SMRT Stumped by Stomp


THE photograph that a content producer of citizen journalism website Stomp posted online, supposedly of an MRT train running with one set of its doors open, has been found to be false.

On discovering this, Mr Patrick Daniel, editor-in-chief of Singapore Press Holdings' English and Malay Newspapers Division, sent a letter yesterday to Mr Tan Ek Kia, the interim chief executive of rail operator SMRT, apologising for the incident.

The content producer, Ms Samantha Francis, was also sacked by SPH, which owns Stomp, on the same day.vThe 23-year-old had initially claimed that she took the photograph at Lakeside MRT station last Tuesday night. But following investigations by SPH, she eventually admitted that she had taken the image from a post on social networking site Twitter. The original tweet has since been removed.

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