Wednesday, 16 August 2017

What Can I Learn In 10 minutes That Can Help My Marriage Last Forever?


The first rule about marriage is don’t do anything that will screw up your marriage. The second rule about marriage is not to forget the first rule.

Many people want to end their marriages. I get it. Sometimes people marry for the wrong reasons and sometimes people marry the wrong people.

Or even better, sometimes you marry the right person but they married the wrong person. Or even worse, sometimes you married the right person but then you just want to screw it up because you get pleasure out of doing that.

Good for you:
  • Always interrupt her when she is trying to explain a problem
  • Eat a lot
  • Openly flirt with other women
  • Even better than the above (since flirting requires a lot of work): accuse her constantly of flirting or cheating on you
  • Stop surprising her
  • Travel a lot and then when you are home, get too tired to spend any time with her
  • After you fight, get really passive aggressive and don’t talk to her until she apologizes
  • Changing sheets, washing dishes, taking care of kids, cleaning the popcorn trail you leave on the floor – that’s her job
  • Disagree on whether or not to have children
  • Find some things that consistently result in arguments
  • Demand sex at odd times
  • Don’t take care of your teeth
  • Take her family’s side
Marriages are fun to end. You should try it. But if you don’t want to, then don’t do any of the things on the above list.

read more

Tuesday, 15 August 2017

Building Resilience In Your Child

You can’t protect your children from all of life’s stressful situations but you can sure teach them to roll with the punches and emerge stronger than ever

Has your child ever had a meltdown while struggling to finish his mountain of school work? Does she feel stressed when faced with an unfamiliar task like a new piano piece? Do negative comments reduce her to tears?

As a parent, you probably wish you could help your children cope better with academic pressure, puberty, peer pressure and even cyberbullying. Later as adults, there’ll be other challenging situations such as work stress, deaths of loved ones or even difficult relationships.

Since we can’t eliminate these situations, the best thing to do is to equip our children with resilience, which allows someone to respond positively in stressful situation. Positive Emotions Rule:
  • ​Be a positive example
  • Boost their confidence
  • Encourage flexible thinking through solving real-life problems

read more

Monday, 14 August 2017

6 things every woman wants from her man


Mutual respect
One of the first things any woman wants in her partner is their respect. Being treated as an equal in the relationship not just boosts a woman’s self-esteem, it also makes us feel valued and loved. When a man puts her woman down whether in public or at home, it adds a crack in the relationship cup and sooner or later it will shatter her and the relationship. If you cannot respect the woman you love, you have no business being with her and women who take insults or jabs lying down need to know that it isn’t okay.

Sharing responsibilities
Women are multitaskers but that does not mean that they love doing everything. Treating women like machines who wake up the earliest and sleep the last is simply inhuman. We would love for our partner to be considerate and share the load. This also means women to help out with finances like paying rent and other utility bills. Just like we do not want our partner to foot all our bills (including dine-outs), we do not want to be solely responsible for managing the house.

Independence
Just because a woman is in a relationship does not mean she loses her individuality and independence. A woman still wants to be the one to decide what she wants to wear, whether she wants to work and even have sex with you or not. Asking you means she wants your opinion which she will consider but the last word is still hers. No woman wants a man who dictates his terms and expects her to follow them blindly. Even though women love to have sex, there are times when they do not want to and forcing them to do so because you are in a relationship is still considered having sex with her against her will.

Splitting household chores
Girls have been trained from childhood that it is the woman of the house who does all the chores even if she is a working woman while the man has the luxury of simply relaxing with the TV remote in hand after a long day in office. If you really want your woman to be happy, split the chores with her, after all, she’s worked just as hard as you in office and is equally tired. Cook a meal together or hang clothes to dry, dust your furniture or clean the bathroom floor. Not only will she appreciate you more, it goes to show how much you love her and wouldn’t want her to be exhausted by doing everything.

Space in a relationship
Yes, you both are in a relationship and it makes you both happy but it does not mean you need to spend every waking moment together. It is good to be apart for short duration and do things you are passionate about. It is also fine for women and men to socialize with their gang without their partners. A girls’ night out, a sleepover with her besties or even an evening spent alone to just be by ourselves is essential and shouldn’t be a cause for a fight the next day.

Appreciation
When a relationship is new, everything is rosy and you find everything about your partner attractive. However, over time, the charm starts to fade and you may forget to appreciate the little things that make her so special. Throw in a compliment to make her happy. Not that women need to hear praises all the time but it is endearing when you notice small things and praise us for it. For instance, if we style our hair differently one day and you like it, don’t forget to tell us or if you loved the coffee, why not let us know. Appreciating us for who we are is also your way of showing us how much you love us.

read more

Sunday, 13 August 2017

Moderate Alcohol Consumption Reduces Heart Attack Risk



A major big data study has determined moderate alcohol consumption is good for you, with a pint of beer per day reducing the risk of heart attacks and angina by a third - moreover, teetotallers are at greater risk of contracting such diseases, with total abstinence increases an individual's cancer odds by 24 percent.

The study, conducted by University College London researchers,  determined moderate alcohol consumption — roughly three pints of beer a day for men, and two glasses of wine for women — produced a "protective effect" in respect of major clinical outcomes such as myocardial infarction, ischaemic stroke, sudden coronary death, heart failure, peripheral arterial disease, and abdominal aortic aneurysm.

The notion alcohol offers imbibers health benefits is nothing new — a 2008 metastudy by Sheffield University concluded four out of five studies into the question showed moderate drinking correlated with a reduction in mortality, with "moderate" defined as. Likewise, previous research has also indicated teetotallers may well be at greater risk of contracting heart disease than casual drinkers.

read more

Saturday, 12 August 2017

A Loaf of Watermelon Bread


In one of the weirdest and most confusing food mash-ups we’ve ever seen, a Taiwanese bakery has invented a loaf of bread that looks just like the equally bizarre square watermelons popular in Japan.

According Jimmy's Bakery, which invented this twisted masterpiece, it was designed to get kids excited about eating bread during the hot summer months when their appetites decrease.

The bread uses natural dyes – green tea for the rind, strawberries for the flesh, and charcoal for the seeds. Some alternative recipes online also suggest trying raisins as seeds.

read more

Friday, 11 August 2017

Skipping breakfast may be bad for your heart


Planning meals and snacks in advance and eating breakfast every day may help lower the risk of cardiovascular disease, new guidelines from U.S. doctors say.

Eating more calories earlier in the day and consuming less food at night may also reduce the odds of a heart attack, stroke or other cardiac or blood vessel diseases, according to the scientific statement from the American Heart Association.

"When we eat may be important to consider, in addition to what we eat," said Marie-Pierre St-Onge, chair of the group that wrote the guidelines and a nutrition researcher at Columbia University Medical Center in New York.

read more

Wednesday, 9 August 2017

The Safest Seat On A Plane

Source: Popular Mechanics
Source: Time

In 2007, Popular Mechanics took matters into its own hands and analyzed NTSB data for every commercial plane crash in the U.S. since 1971 that had both survivors and fatalities and for which a detailed seating chart was accessible. Their conclusion:

Passengers near the tail of a plane were about 40 percent more likely to survive a crash than those in the front.
  • Seats in the back of the plane, behind the trailing edge of the wing, had a 69 percent survival rate, while seats over the wing and in coach had a 56 percent survival rate. The front 15 percent of seats had a 49 percent survival rate, analysts found.
  • A second analysis in 2015, for which researchers at Time went through 35 years of FAA data, found similar results. The group narrowed their research to 17 accidents dating back to 1985 that had both fatalities and survivors and for which seating charts were available. Time found seats in the rear third of the aircraft had a lower fatality rate (32 percent) than seats in the overwing (39 percent) or front (38 percent) thirds of the plane.
Specifically, middle seats in the rear section specifically fared best by far, with a fatality rate of 28 percent.
  • The least safe were aisle seats in the middle third of the cabin, which had a fatality rate of 44 percent.
  • The Time researchers noted that the specific circumstances of a crash can render these averages irrelevant. But by and large, the back of the plane is the place to be.
  • Of course, there are ways to increase your chances of survival no matter where you’re seated. Pay attention to the safety briefing, know the number of rows to your nearest exit, and be prepared to brace yourself in the event of a very unlikely crash.

read more

Tuesday, 8 August 2017

Do you #LoveYourSkin?

Find out how to tackle these 5 common skin problems
Plagued by any of these common skin problems? Here’s what you can do

Suffer from skin problems, take heart! You are hardly alone. Here are 5 common skin problems in Singapore and what you can do to heal, as well as prevent, them. Your #LoveYourSkin journey starts here:
  • Sensitive Skin (irritant contact dermatitis)
  • General Irritation
  • Rashes
  • Eczema
  • Acne

read more

Sunday, 6 August 2017

A centerless Ferris Wheel in China


Aerial photo taken on May 17, 2017 shows a centerless ferris wheel located in Weifang City, east China's Shandong Province. The ferris wheel, whose diameter is 125 meters, has a height of 145 meters. It is built according to the designing concept of kite and has 36 sight-seeing cabins.

read more

Friday, 4 August 2017

Beg-packing: Is travel a privilege or a right?

'Beg-packing' phenomenon provokes backlash

The growing number of westerners begging for cash to travel raises ethical questions.

It's a question the phenomenon of "beg-packing" - a newly coined term for setting up camp on a pavement to raise funds for travel - has been raising worldwide.

Begpackers are becoming an increasingly common sight on the streets of South East Asia, The Observers at France 24 reported. While some busk or sell their holiday snaps for cash, others simply hold up signs asking passersby to support their travels.

read more

Travellers 'Beg-Packing' In SE Asia Prompt Social Media Backlash
Wan Chai, Hong Kong. "I am traveling around Asia without money, please support my trip." (Photo: Rama Kulkarni via gal-dem.com)

Prepare yourself for the most annoying phenomenon of the week... A contraction of backpacking and begging, the concept of 'beg-packing' refers to western travellers on low budgets deciding to set up camp on pavements around the world and begging locals to fund their plane tickets.

Strumming a guitar or selling a few knick knacks, the careless tourists probably mean no harm (they probably also see themselves as delightfully bohemian) but this kind of behaviour is not necessarily viewed in the same way across the world.

As France 24 reports, people all around Southeast Asia, from Malaysia to Hong Kong, Thailand to Singapore, are taking to social media to criticise the entitled travellers, usually seen armed with signs saying things like "Support our trip around the world".

read more

Westerners have come under fire for "begpacking"

The increasingly familiar sight of white tourists begging for money on the streets of Thailand to support their travels is drawing some serious criticism – but should we be so quick to judge?

The trend of western backpackers busking or begging to fund their travels, dubbed “begpacking”, has been getting a lot of attention – and not in a good way. Seen mainly in South East Asian countries such as Thailand, Singapore and Malaysia, the practice has come under scrutiny of late, with detractors branding it “lazy” and “disgusting” on social media.

Pictures have circulated online of white travellers selling postcards and playing the guitar with signs saying: “I am travelling around Asia without money. Please support my trip,” and locals and commentators alike have shared their anger at the increase in western people begging.

read more

‘Beg-packers’ are begging on the streets to fund round-the-world travels
One appeal, which states ‘support our trip around the world’, is propped up by a pricey DSLR camera

There are a few reasons in life why people may genuinely need to beg on the streets. Whether that be that they’re ill, poor or even just needing funds for survival.

However some people are appealing to the public for an entirely different reason – one that many are calling ‘disrespectful’.

Yes, travellers around southeast Asia are actually now begging for money to finance their lifestyle choices alongside some of the region’s poorest citizens. The Western backpackers – who have been branded ‘beg-packers’ on social media – have been singing in the streets and even selling postcards in a bid to fund their trips.

read more

Woman asks people to fund her '$10k spiritual journey around the world'
becca-gronski-travel.jpg
Becca Gronski is aiming to raise $10,000 to travel the world Facebook

A woman has apparently launched a crowd-funding effort in the hopes of raising $10,000 (£8,000) to fund her “spiritual journey around the world.”

Becca Gronski, a self-proclaimed “spiritual teacher, life coach, reiki and crystal healer” from the US, set up the GoFundMe page in February to realise her dream of helping people achieve their potential.

Ms Gronski said the money would be used to fund her travels, write a book about her journey and give back to communities by sharing her unique skills for free.

read more

Famous Beggar Benjamin Holst Arrested In Surabaya
Famous Party Beggar Benjamin Holst Bagged in Surabaya

World renowned beggar Benjamin Holst is a folk hero with an abnormally large leg. He has been able to travel the world and party with cash made by panhandling, but recently he was arrested in Surabaya.

Infamous German con man Benjamin Holst — also known as ‘the party beggar with the big foot’ — was apprehended by local law enforcement in Surabaya on Sunday, September 11.

Holst is a well-known scam artist in Europe. Before showing up in the City of Heroes, he was spotted at a traffic light in Tabanan, Bali on Sunday, September 4. Someone took a video of Holst, which ended up going viral on social media.

read more

Foreign backpackers hit the streets of KL for money

What do you do when you run low on money while travelling? A new wave of foreign tourists is hitting the streets of Kuala Lumpur to make a quick buck.

The Star Online toured Bukit Bintang on a humid Tuesday night and counted seven tourists asking passers-by to help support their travels.

Among them, two were selling caricature drawings, one was peddling aerosol spray paintings, two were busking, and one was seen panhandling.

read more

WHY ASKING ASIAN PEOPLE TO FUND YOUR TRAVELS ABROAD IS WRONG
hungerstats

For some context, we live in Hong Kong — I’m South Asian and have lived here since I was eight, and my partner is native to this city. Upon seeing this, we were both completely grossed out, but not at all surprised. Unfortunately, Hong Kong has a pretty solid population of entitled white tourists and obnoxious white residents.

Outside of the specific context of Hong Kong, I want to note that white people demanding money from people of colour to support their whimsical journeys of self discovery (though they will completely lack any reflection on their whiteness and the privileges that come with it) is appalling no matter where it takes place. But in this article, I want to go into why the notion of “travelling around Asia” and asking for funds for it in Hong Kong, specifically, is fucked up. And it has a great deal to do with colonialism.

Hong Kong’s own fairly recent history with Colonialism is very painful. The British occupation of this area, which went on from 1841 to 1997 (though Hong Kong was also briefly occupied by Japan during WW2), involved wars, segregation, and the exploitation of local people in various forms, including a forced market of opium addiction. The west, colonialism, and white supremacy have already taken from this place. For a white person, whether or not they be British, to be asking for FREE MONEY here is insensitive and deplorable.

read more

Beg-packing: Brit’s GoFundMe panned for asking netizens to fund Southeast Asia travels

On Tuesday, Brit backpacker Jacob Stroner created a GoFundMe campaign asking readers to cough up cash to fund his travels through Southeast Asia.

The long entry, titled “Travelling disaster,” tells of Stroner’s numerous passport, visa, and flight mishaps due to a damaged passport that led to him being held in detention cells in both Suvarnabhumi Airport and a Vietnamese airport and blowing through his savings on flight tickets he could not use since his passport was not valid for travel.

He’s now back at home in Overton, England, but hopes to get back to Asia with a new passport in hand as soon as possible. And he’d like you to pay for it.

related: Some young Caucasians have been panhandling at Tampines to fund their trip around the world

read more

Notorious begpacker barred from entering S’pore, goes around the world begging

Begpacking, a play on backpacking, is a newly coined term which refers to a fresh breed of backpackers who go around the world begging for money to fund their travels.

For reference, here’s a pair of tourists busking illegally and selling postcards at Tampines bus interchange on April 4.

They caught the attention of one Twitter user, who was irritated that they would put themselves in the same position as real beggars who actually need the money for survival.

read more

'Gap yah' backpackers begging for money should be ashamed of themselves

Take a walk down Khao San Road in Bangkok and you’ll see people lining the streets asking for money. Only they’re not homeless locals struggling to feed their families; they’re gap yah backpackers who spent their week’s budget on too many drinks in the hostel bar #fail #YOLO.

There has been a recent rise in ‘begpackers’ - that’s backpackers who are begging - across some of the poorest countries in the world. Their attempts to fund their trips via begging, busking and occasionally selling their holiday photos have been snapped and shared on social media by more socially aware travellers - and disgusted locals.

Most of the begpackers have been spotted in South East Asia, along the well-trodden traveller’s trail of Thailand-Cambodia-Laos-Vietnam and across into Malaysia. One woman from Singapore, Maisarah Abu Samah, was shocked to see two white couples selling postcards and playing music for money.

read more

You might need to produce 20,000THB in cash the next time you visit Thailand

The next time you visit Bangkok, Phuket or anywhere else in Thailand on a tourist visa, you might need to produce 20,000THB (S$814.60) in cash.

According to a report by news portal Thaivisa, foreigners have been refused entry for not having this cash when entering Thailand. This increased scrutiny is to crack down on foreigners who officials suspect are not genuine tourists and who may be working in Thailand illegally.

In general, Singaporeans are entitled to a 30-days visa exemption when visiting Thailand. As for tourist visas, they may be granted to short term visitors who intend to stay in Thailand for 60 days per trip or less. The Single-Entry Tourist Visa is valid for entering Thailand once within 3 months from the date of application.

read more

Thursday, 3 August 2017

3 ways to make an extra $1,500 a month when you retire


When it comes to financial planning, small and specific goals are best. Aspiring to make $15,000 or $25,000 a month without working is all well and good, but don’t forget to take concrete steps to secure a realistic amount. With some discipline and prudence, it’s not unrealistic to aim for an extra $1,500 a month (on top of CPF payouts) after retirement. Here are three ways:

First of all, why an extra $1,500 a month?

An extra $1,500 a month may not seem dramatic but its effects on retirement can be life changing.

Consider that the average Singaporean, who retires with the minimum sum of $161,000 in CPF, will only get around $943 to $1,017 per month (estimated payout via CPF Basic). That comes to about $33.90 per day.

If that seems enough to you, you’re forgetting to account for the effect of inflation.

Let’s assume an inflation rate of three per cent per annum, and look ahead 25 years. At that rate, something that costs a dollar today will, by rough estimate, cost around $2.09 by the year 2042. This means your purchasing power decreases by around 52.2 per cent.

Now the effect is easier to visualise if you work backwards, so let’s do that.

At a loss of 52.2 percent of purchasing power, your CPF payout of $1,017 per month would effectively be around $530.90 today. If you were retired right now, with that kind of purchasing power, how pleasant would life be?

You would be living on around $17.70 a day. That’s survivable, but it’s far from luxurious. Beyond three square meals and the occasional indulgence, there’s not much to look forward to for the rest of your years.

That’s why finding a way to make an extra $1,500 a month at retirement is important. $1,500 is effectively an extra $783 a month if you take away the 52.2 percent reduction in purchasing power. That’s enough to maybe go on vacation twice a year, replace your television when it’s broken, take up those music lessons you always wanted, and so forth.

The best part is, $1,500 is a small enough sum to be realistic and achievable.

There are three ways you can get it:
  • Invest in reliable, dividend-paying stocks
  • Constantly reallocate funds to your CPF SA
  • Don’t downsize to anything less than a three-room

read more

Wednesday, 2 August 2017

Singapore to JB MRT by 2024


Singapore - Johor Baru MRT to run in 2024

A cross-border rail link that will connect Singapore & Johor Baru in Malaysia is slated to begin passenger services by the end of 2024, ministers from the 2 countries announced on Monday (Jul 31).

Singapore rail company SMRT & Malaysia’s metro operator Prasarana Malaysia will be exploring a joint venture to be the operating company to help design, build, finance & operate the trains, tracks and systems for the Johor Bahru - Singapore Rapid Transit System (RTS) Link.

The details were disclosed on Monday during the 13th meeting of the Malaysia-Singapore Joint Ministerial Committee for Iskandar Malaysia (JMCIM), held in Iskandar Puteri, Johor Baru. The committee was set up in 2007 as a collaboration between the 2 countries.

read more

Singapore - JB MRT to start by end-2024
Singapore-JB MRT to start by end-2024
(From left) Minister for National Development Lawrence Wong, Malaysia's Minister in the Prime Minister's Department Abdul Rahman Dahlan, Coordinating Minister for Infrastructure Khaw Boon Wan and Johor Menteri Besar Khaled Nordin. FOTO: THE STRAITS TIMES

Passengers will be able to hop on an MRT train in Woodlands to cross the border to Johor Baru by Dec 31, 2024.

The Rapid Transit System (RTS) Link can carry up to 10,000 passengers an hour in each direction between Johor's Bukit Chagar terminus station & the Singapore terminus in Woodlands North, where it will join the upcoming Thomson-East Coast Line.

It is slated to improve connectivity & reduce congestion at border crossings between the two countries when completed.

read more

Singapore to Johor Baru MRT service to start by end-2024
Malaysia's Minister in the Prime Minister's Department Abdul Rahman Dahlan with Coordinating Minister for Infrastructure Khaw Boon Wan, who is also Transport Minister, enjoying durian during a tea break at Afiniti Medini, after a site visit to the mixed-use development. ST FOTO: JONATHAN CHOO

Passengers will be able to hop on an MRT train in Woodlands to cross the border to Johor Baru by Dec 31, 2024.

The Rapid Transit System (RTS) Link can carry up to 10,000 passengers an hour in each direction between Johor's Bukit Chagar terminus station & the Singapore terminus in Woodlands North, where it will join the upcoming Thomson- East Coast Line (TEL).

It is slated to improve connectivity & reduce congestion at border crossings between Singapore & Malaysia when completed.

read more

Singapore - JB Rapid Transit System to make impact on Johor real estate: Analysts

Investor interest in Johor Baru properties will likely pickup with recent news that Singapore & Malaysia are expected to ink a bilateral agreement for the Rapid Transit System (RTS) next year, analysts told Channel NewsAsia.

The system promises an easier time crossing borders, & will link up with the Thomson-East Coast rail network in Singapore. Analysts, however, said it is important for investors to do their homework, before buying a stake in Johor's developments.

Mr Peter Ezekiel travels across the causeway daily for work. The 46-yr-old lawyer decided to rent a house in Johor Bahru while waiting for his new flat in Singapore to be ready as the former option is cheaper.

read more

related:
Singapore to JB MRT by 2024
S'pore-KL HSR swallows another golf course
S'pore-KL High Speed Rail Agreement
HSR S'pore-KL in just 90 minutes

Tuesday, 1 August 2017

What is it like to be a Singaporean?


Here’s a quick and easy guide:
  • You are born.
  • You study.
  • You serve NS and are put under a 10 years reservist and IPPT cycle that can stretch into your 40s while you have to juggle family and work commitments at the same time.
  • After NS you come out to work and fall in love,married and start up a family.
  • A wedding cost a lot so most Singaporeans married in their late 20s,mid 30s or even later.
  • Now we come to the house. Upon successfully balloting for the house one need to wait at least 3 years for it or you can buy from open market or private developers where price will be even much higher.
  • Once you get your keys your entire CPF OA will be depleted totally and the rest of the mortgage balance will be paid by your monthly CPF every month for a maximum of up to over a decade or 25 years max.
  • During this time every month of your CPF will not be able to save and accumulate CPF interests because you need to use it to settle house loan.
  • So 25 years finally finish and your house is fully paid up but by then you will be 55 or into your 60s already.
  • You want to rest and retire but you can’t because your CPF OA account is empty and CPF minimum sum of 161k is set in place to prevent you from cashing out your CPF in full to use to finance your retirement.
  • So in your 50s or 60s you still need to work until you die or at least for another 10 to 20 years in order to build up your CPF OA account.
  • By the time you can really rest you will be in your 70s or 80s already. Most will have meet their maker by that age already. Lol How to look forward to retirement bliss?
  • Also the health could be failing or no one is willing to employ the elderly Singaporeans and what are they going to survive on?
  • In the end their CPF Medisave accounts got wipe out and they either rent their flats out to sustain themselves or sell back their flats and lease to downgrade in order to survive in their dying years.
  • If anyone can still say Singaporeans are living a blessed life then I clap for you.

read more

video


Singapore: Best Place to Live and Work