Monday, 5 December 2016

Trump tweets conversation with Taiwanese leader but not Singapore’s


America’s President-Elect Donald Trump yesterday (1 Dec) tweeted about the phone call he had from Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen. The call, is believed to be the first between a US president or president-elect and a leader of Taiwan since diplomatic relations between Washington and the island were cut in 1979.

Trump also received a call from Singapore’s Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong yesterday. Mr Lee writing in his Facebook said that the call was to congratulate him on winning the US presidential elections and to invite him and his family to visit Singapore.

But Trump’s phone call with with Tsai was more tweet-worthy than his conversation with Lee because while Singapore has had close relationship with the ruling elites in Washington under three Prime Ministers, Taiwan’s leaders have not had direct contact with their US counterparts since 1979.

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Donald J. Trump @ realDonaldTrump
The President of Taiwan CALLED ME today to wish me congratulations on winning the Presidency. Thank you!

related: Facebook

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Trump says Taiwan president called me to offer congratulations

U.S. President-Elect Donald Trump said on Friday that Taiwanese President Tsai Ing-wen called him on Friday to congratulate him on his election win.

Trump's conversation with Tsai was the first such contact with Taiwan by a president-elect or president since President Jimmy Carter adopted a one-China policy in 1979 and is likely to infuriate Beijing.

"The President of Taiwan CALLED ME today to wish me congratulations on winning the Presidency. Thank you!" Trump said in a Twitter message. REUTERS

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Trump criticises Beijing in defence of call with Taiwan’s leader

Two days after Donald Trump created a
diplomatic dispute with China over Taiwan, the president-elect took to Twitter on Sunday evening to criticise Beijing and defend his decision to speak with the Taiwanese president. China issued a protest on Saturday after Mr Trump spoke on the phone with Tsai Ing-wen, the first such contact with a Taiwanese leader since the US severed diplomatic ties in 1979.

Although vice-president elect Mike Pence sought to play down the controversy on Sunday morning, describing the conversation as a “courtesy call”, Mr Trump used Twitter hours later to slam Chinese economic and foreign policies — the latest instance of the president-elect trying to apply the unconventional, improvised style from his election campaign to the world of diplomacy.
“Did China ask us if it was OK to devalue their currency (making it hard for our companies to compete), heavily tax our products going into their country (the US doesn’t tax them) or to build a massive military complex in the middle of the South China Sea?” he asked. “I don’t think so!”

China lodges protest after Trump call with Taiwan president

China lodged a diplomatic protest on Saturday after U.S. President-elect Donald Trump spoke by phone with President Tsai Ing-wen of Taiwan, but blamed the self-ruled island Beijing claims as its own for the "petty" move.

The 10-minute telephone call with Taiwan's leadership was the first by a U.S. president-elect or president since President Jimmy Carter switched diplomatic recognition from Taiwan to China in 1979, acknowledging Taiwan as part of "one China".

China's Foreign Ministry said it had lodged "stern representations" with what it called the "relevant U.S. side", urging the careful handling of the Taiwan issue to avoid any unnecessary disturbances in ties.

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China lodges formal protest after Donald Trump’s Taiwan call

The Chinese government has lodged a formal protest with Washington over Donald Trump’s phone call with the leader of Taiwan, as the US president-elect triggered a diplomatic dispute with Beijing more than a month before he assumes office.

The call with Tsai Ing-wen is believed to be the first between a US president or president-elect and a president of Taiwan, which Beijing views as a renegade province, since diplomatic relations between Washington and the island were cut in 1979.

“It must be pointed out that there is only one China in the world,” the Chinese foreign ministry said in a statement on Saturday, adding that it had lodged “solemn representations with the US.

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Trump shrugs off fuss over Taiwan presdient's call

U.S. President-elect Donald Trump is unapologetic about roiling diplomatic waters with his decision to speak on the phone with Taiwan’s leader, a breach of long-standing tradition that risks enmity from China.

The U.S. severed diplomatic ties with the self-governing island in 1979 but has maintained close unofficial relations and a commitment to support its defense.

Trump’s conversation with Taiwanese President Tsai Ing-wen drew an irritated, although understated, response from China, as Foreign Minister Wang Yi said Saturday that the contact was “just a small trick by Taiwan” that he believed would not change U.S. policy toward China, according to Hong Kong’s Phoenix TV.


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'Utterly unnecessary': Donald Trump slammed for provoking tensions with China

A diplomatically explosive
phone call between president-elect Donald Trump and the president of Taiwan risks provoking a cold war between the United States and China with potentially catastrophic economic and security implications for the region and the world, according to former Australian foreign minister Bob Carr.

The phone call is thought to be the first official direct communication between an American president or president-elect and a Taiwanese leader since the US and China opened diplomatic relations in 1979.

According to a Taiwanese statement, Mr Trump and President Tsai Ing-wen discussed ways to "strengthen [Taiwanese] national defense, allowing the people better lives and a guarantee of security. The two briefly exchanged opinions on the situation in the Asia region".


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Trump-Tsai Phone Call a Good Start to Reforming US-Taiwan Relations


The transition team has announced that President-elect Donald Trump spoke by
phone with the president of Taiwan, Tsai Ing-wen Friday. Not only is there nothing wrong with this, it could be a sign of good things to come in America’s Taiwan policy.

U.S.-Taiwan relations operate under a number of restrictions derived from the three communiques with China that form the basis of America’s one China policy. Some of them are a necessary part of honoring America’s decision in 1979 to formally recognize the People’s Republic of China. Many are not.

The restrictions range from the symbolic, yet seemingly arbitrary–like the circumstances under which Taiwan’s Washington representative is permitted to use its historic residence, Twin Oaks, or display its flag–to more critical areas, like interaction between U.S. and Taiwanese military officers.

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Trump, Taiwan Put China on the Defensive With Historic Phone Call

U.S. President-elect Donald Trump and the leader of Taiwan put China on the defensive late Friday with a historic, upbeat phone call to discuss Washington’s role in possibly helping the diplomatically isolated island gain international status.

China’s foreign minister dubbed the 12-minute phone call by Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen a “petty action” that will lead to no changes in Sino-U.S. relations.

But the communist leadership will watch for fallout, such as whether Trump talks again with Taiwan after his Jan. 20 inauguration or gives Taiwan some of what its president suggested on the call, experts predict.

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Donald Trump's phone call with Taiwan president risks China's wrath
Donald Trump’s conversation with Taiwan president Tsai Ing-wen is set to cause diplomatic waves. Photograph: Chiang Ying-ying/AP

Donald Trump looked to have sparked a potentially damaging diplomatic row with China on Friday after speaking to Taiwanese president Tsai Ing-wen on the telephone in a move experts said would anger Beijing.

The call, first reported by the Taipei Times and confirmed by the Financial Times, is thought to be the first between the leader of the island and a US president or president-elect since ties between America and Taiwan were severed in 1979, at Beijing’s behest.

The US closed its embassy in Taiwan – a democratically ruled island which Beijing considers a breakaway province – in the late 1970s following the historic rapprochement between Beijing and Washington that stemmed from Richard Nixon’s 1972 trip to China.

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China blames Taiwan for president's 'petty' phone call with Trump

U.S. President-elect Donald Trump spoke by phone with President Tsai Ing-wen of Taiwan, the first such contact between the two sides in nearly four decades, but China dismissed the call as a "petty action" by the self-ruled island it claims as its own.

The 10-minute telephone call with Taiwan's leadership was the first by a U.S. president-elect or president since President Jimmy Carter switched diplomatic recognition from Taiwan to China in 1979, acknowledging Taiwan as part of "one China".

Hours after Friday's call, Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi blamed Taiwan for the exchange, avoiding what could have been a major rift with Washington just before Trump assumes the presidency.

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Lee Hsien Loong Facebook

Spoke to President-elect Donald J. Trump on the phone to congratulate him on winning the US presidential elections.

We talked about the close and long-standing friendship between Singapore and US. We cooperate in many areas – economic, defence and security, education, and people-to-people. Our relations have endured through nine US Presidents, and Singapore wants to work with the incoming Administration to further strengthen ties.

I invited Mr Trump and his family to visit Singapore, and looked forward to meeting him in person soon. – LHL

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PM Lee invites US President-elect Trump to visit S’pore during congratulatory phone call

Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong has invited United States President-elect Donald Trump to visit Singapore.

He extended the invitation during a telephone conversation to congratulate the newly elected Trump on his presidential election win.

PM Lee also spoke about the friendship between the two countries that has endured through nine US Presidents.

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PM Lee speaks with Trump, invites him to S’pore

Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong has called US President-elect Donald Trump to congratulate him on his win, and invited Mr Trump and his family to Singapore.

In a Facebook post on Friday (Dec 2) evening, Mr Lee also said they had spoken on “the close and long-standing” Singapore-US relations, adding that the Republic wants to wants to work with the incoming Administration to further strengthen ties”.

“We cooperate in many areas – economic, defence and security, education, and people-to-people. Our relations have endured through nine US Presidents,” added Mr Lee.

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Trump speaks with leaders of Afghanistan, Singapore

U.S. President-elect Donald Trump spoke by phone on Friday with Afghan President Ashraf Ghani, the Trump transition team said in a statement.

"The two men discussed the grave terrorism threats facing both countries and pledged to work more closely together in order to meet these growing threats," the statement said.

Trump also spoke on Friday with Singapore Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong. "The two men discussed the long history of good economic, political, and security relations between the United States and Singapore," according to the statement.

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Congratulations to President-Elect Donald Trump!

Congratulations to President-Elect Donald Trump! His candidacy took many by surprise. At each stage he defied expectations, and his journey has ultimately taken him to the White House.

It has been a contentious, ugly election season, that has exposed a bitter divide in the American people. Many will celebrate this result, while others will understandably be surprised and disappointed. But like the Brexit referendum in June, Mr Trump’s victory is part of a broader pattern in developed countries – reflecting a deep frustration with the way things are, and a strong wish to reassert a sense of identity, and somehow to change the status quo.

US voters have elected a President whom they feel best represents them. Singapore fully respects their decision. We will continue to work together with the United States to cultivate our strong ties. – LHL

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Congratulations, Trump. Welcome to hell
Dear Mr. Trump
You won. Welcome to hell.

And to think, I thought you’d become president when hell froze over.

Now that the election is finally behind us, may I ask a tiny question: Why did you want this job? Was it on your bucket list? After so many square miles of golf courses, trophy wives, gilt mirrors and crystal chandeliers, was there nothing left to mess with?

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