Friday, 8 July 2016

SMRT subway trains recalled after defects found


Update 13 Jul 2016: Why hairline cracks not made public

The hairline cracks found on the 26 China-assembled trains did not pose a safety risk, so the issue was not made public when the defects were discovered 3 years ago, said Transport Minister Khaw Boon Wan yesterday.


While the defects required the trains to be sent back progressively to the manufacturer in Qingdao to have their car bodies replaced, this also did not impact the capacity of the North-South East-West Lines (NSEWL), he said.


"These 2 issues, which will have impact on Singaporeans and commuters, are not being compromised at all," he said, explaining why the Land Transport Authority (LTA) and the Ministry of Transport (MOT) treated the rectification process as a "routine matter".


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Train cracks: Routine matter spun into controversy, says Khaw
Transport Minister Khaw Boon Wan inspecting a fixed bolster on an SMRT train that has a hairline crack, at Bishan Depot on Jul 12, 2016. Foto: Ooi Boon Keong

In his 1st public comments since news broke last week that 26 China-made SMRT trains were found to have hairline cracks, Transport Minister Khaw Boon Wan said the cracks were a routine matter that had been “mis-spun into a controversy”.


Had the hairline cracks found on the trains compromised safety or service availability, the authorities would have released the information “immediately”, he told reporters on Tue (Jul 12) during a media briefing at Bishan Depot.


Mr Khaw, who is also Coordinating Minister for Infrastructure, linked the news — broken by Hong Kong’s FactWire news agency — to factions in the city with an anti-China political agenda. Having read various analyses on the controversy, Mr Khaw said: “We are caught in a crossfire and there are factions in Hong Kong who wanted to cause some difficulties for mainland China. I have no inside information on whether that is true or not, but it’s possible.” 


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An Open Letter to Singapore’s Transport Minister Khaw Boon Wan

Singapore’s Transport Minister Khaw Boon Wan appeared at the SMRT’s Bishan Depot on Wednesday, July 13, 2016 to explain why “hairline” train cracks were not made public. He is the highest ranking Singapore official to speak about the issue eight days after FactWire’s investigative report revealed the cover up of the train recalls. However, instead of taking responsibility for an incident which has damaged the Singaporean public’s trust in the authorities, the minister blamed the Hong Kong news agency for exposing the cover up of the recalls of defective trains, claiming that Singapore has been used as a “convenient bullet” in a “crossfire” between factions in Hong Kong:
“We are caught in a crossfire and there are factions in Hong Kong who wanted to cause some difficulties for mainland China. I have no inside information on whether that is true or not, but it’s possible. Unfortunately, we become a convenient bullet and collateral damage.”
FactWire deeply regrets the false statements that Singapore’s Transport Minister made against this news agency. Founded by 3,300 Hong Kong people in a journalism crowdfunding campaign that broke records in Asia, FactWire is entirely funded by the public. Thus, it is the public that this new agency serves, independent of any commercial or political interests.

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Recall of Defective Trains to China for Repair

The Workers’ Party is very concerned with the revelation of manufacturing defects in some of the trains used by the MRT, leading to 26 of these trains being shipped back to China for repair or replacement. Major issues affecting our public transport system should be discussed publicly.

Five of The Workers’ Party’s Members of Parliament filed parliamentary questions for oral answer to the Minister of Transport on Friday, 8 July 2016. We look forward to the Minister’s full account of the issue in Parliament in August.

The five questions are as follows:

  1. MP for Aljunied Pritam Singh: To ask the Minister for Transport (a) what are the total number of MRT trains deployed for operations; (b) what percentage of these trains are not embarking passengers due to depot-level train repairs through to 2019 affecting the trains supplied by CSR Sifang; (c) in what way has this episode affected the Ministry’s plans to improve the reliability of the MRT system.
  2. MP for Aljunied Muhamad Faisal Abdul Manap: To ask the Minister for Transport whether members of the PTC, Board members of SMRT and the LTA and the management of Temasek Holdings were aware of both (a) the faults being discovered on trains supplied to the LTA by Kawasaki Heavy Industries and CSR Sifang in 2013; and (b) the subsequent train recall exercise.
  3. NCMP Dennis Tan Lip Fong: To ask the Minister for Transport (a) was the Ministry/LTA aware of the problems with the MRT trains delivered in 2013 from Kawasaki Heavy Industries and CSR Sifang under a previous contract before placing new orders with the same consortium for more trains in 2014 and 2015; (b) if so, why were further contracts for additional trains extended to the same consortium; (c) did the Ministry/LTA evaluate alternative suppliers before placing the new orders in 2014 and 2015; (d) were any changes made to the new contracts with the consortium in 2014 and/or 2015 or any extraordinary QC measures put in place to ensure that the same problems would not recur; and (e) has the Ministry/LTA required the supplier to provide mitigating solutions or compensation for the operational set-back.
  4. NCMP Daniel Goh Pei Siong: To ask the Minister for Transport, with regards to the 26 defective MRT trains, (a) whether the defects being not “safety-critical” meant that they pose zero safety risks for commuters, (b) why is it most effective for the car-bodies to be entirely replaced when cracks were found only on the bolsters, (c) what the risks are for cracks to happen on other components of the car-body, (d) whether the monthly safety assessment is focused only on the found defects or conducted for the entire train.
  5. NCMP Leon Perera: To ask the Minister for Transport (a) whether current guidelines require information about the defects noted in/after 2013 and the subsequent train recall exercise initiated for 26 out of the 35 trains delivered to the LTA by Kawasaki Heavy Industries and CSR Sifang in 2013 to be made public; (b) if so, why was this information not released to the public prior to the news having been broadcast by a foreign news outlet; and (c) if not, will these guidelines be reviewed?

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Hong Kong’s FactWire rebuts Minister Khaw

FactWire noted the Minister’s remarks with deep regret. It said that FactWire is news media funded by 3,300 people in Hong Kong. It is funded by the Hong Kong public and as such, accord its services to the Hong Kong public. It has no backings from any political nor commercial interest groups.

It also said that in publishing an article, its editorial principle is to ensure that the news must involve significant public interest and that it has acquired solid evidence. Its professional judgment will not be overriden by any commercial or political considerations.


Taking a swipe at Minister Khaw, FactWire added, “As a public service news agency, when a public official potentially guilty of dereliction of his duty gets angry as a result of being embarrassed by our report, it proves that what we did is right.”

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FactWire regrets false statement by Singapore’s Tranport Minister
Hong Kong based news agency, FactWire has said in a public statement that it regrets the false statement by Transport Minister, Khaw Boon Wan about Singapore being used as a "convenient bullet" in a “crossfire” between factions in Hong Kong and that it serves the public, independent of any commercial or political interests.

The Transport Minister appeared at the SMRT’s Bishan Depot on Wednesday, July 13, 2016 to explain why “hairline” train cracks were not made public.

FacWire noted that instead of of taking responsibility for an incident which has damaged the Singaporean public’s trust in the authorities, Mr Khaw blamed the Hong Kong news agency for exposing the cover up of the recalls of defective trains, claiming that Singapore has been used as a “convenient bullet” in a “crossfire” between factions in Hong Kong:

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FactWire rebuts Transport Minister Khaw Boon Wan, deeply regrets his false statements

Hong Kong-based crowdfunded investigative news agency FactWire has responded to Transport Minister Khaw Boon Wan’s latest remarks about its scoop on Singapore’s defective MRT trains being returned to China last week.

FactWire published a Facebook note, “An Open Letter to Singapore’s Transport Minister”, taking issue with Khaw’s comments, which were made in a press conference held on Tuesday, July 12.

Khaw said Singapore was caught in a power struggles between China and Hong Kong, which FactWire said is false.

related: What is FactWire, why they report on defective SMRT train carriages in S’pore?

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FactWire to Khaw: ‘When politicians are riled, it’s proof we’re doing the right thing’

INVESTIGATIVE news agency FactWire, which broke the scoop on Singapore’s MRT trains being returned to China last week, has responded to Transport Minister Khaw Boon Wan’s latest remarks about its report.

Describing his remarks as “false statements” in a note titled “An Open Letter to Singapore’s Transport Minister”, FactWire took issue with Mr Khaw’s comments, which he gave in a press conference held on Tuesday (July 12). He had suggested then that the report was evidence of a power struggle at play between China and Hong Kong.

“We are caught in a crossfire and there are factions in Hong Kong who wanted to cause some difficulties for mainland China,” Mr Khaw told reporters. “Unfortunately, we become a convenient bullet and collateral damage.”

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Factwire to Minister Khaw: Don’t get angry at facts just because you’re embarrassed

Hongkong free press, Factwire, wrote a Facebook post responding to Singapore’s Transport Minister telling the latter to not get angry at fact.

related: Minister KBW: It is the fault of the HK press for exposing the cover up

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Defective Trains: The Sagely One Speaks

"Many Singaporeans must have heaved a sign of deep relief when Khaw Boon Wan finally put on his safety helmet to show up at Bishan MRT Depot. After all, there was a report that, “Singaporeans prepare for worst as Khaw Boon Wan still missing 2 days after defective MRT trains made public.”

The Sagely One (remember his ‘Butterfly Lovers’ explanation of the Sengkang Columbarium sage – his then HDB officers had assumed, yes assumed the winner of a tender to be affiliated to a religious organization), must have been meditating at Mount Silent prior to showing up. It seems the time spent invisible and incommunicado was worth it for us as he didn’t disappoint with his words of wisdom to explain why LTA’s and his transport ministry’s hands were forced on the issue of our defective trains.

Undue Panic - Declaring that trains were being returned to China for repairs due to hairline cracks could have caused undue panic, Transport Minister Khaw Boon Wan said at the Bishan Depot on Tuesday (Jul 12).

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Train defects did not pose safety risks, says Khaw

The recalled train with hairline cracks on the carbody bolster on July 12, 2016

The hairline cracks found on the 26 China-made trains did not pose a safety concern, hence the issue was not made public when the defects were 1st discovered in 2013, said Transport Minister Khaw Boon Wan yesterday.


The defects, which required the trains to be sent back progressively to the manufacturer in Qingdao to have their car-bodies replaced, also did not impact reliability or capacity, he added during a press briefing.


This issue, 1st brought to light by Hong Kong media FactWire last week, is a "seemingly routine matter" that had been "misspun" by "mischievous hands", said Mr Khaw.


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Andrew Loh FB 13 July 00:37

Just wanted to pop in here to post this because I find what Khaw Boon Wan said reasonable.

I'm referring to Khaw''s explanation about why the authorities did not disclose the cracks in the trains to the public. Because he doesn't want the public to "panic", Mr Khaw said.

I think it's a sound decision.

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Khaw: Mischievous to spin train defect issue into controversy
picture credit: The Straits Times

Yesterday, Transport Minister Khaw Boon Wan held a press conference with regard to the defective China-made trains uncovered by Hong Kong online media FactWire.

LTA has been shipping the defective trains back to China for repairs over the past 2 years but prefers to keep things quiet. Many Singaporeans are asking why the issue was not made public earlier and had to be uncovered through a Hong Kong media.

Mr Khaw said that the cracks found on the car-body bolster, an aluminium alloy structure under the train carriage, were not major and did not pose any safety risk. So, the issue was not made public.

related:
What Khaw Boon Wan said is reasonable
Defective Trains: The Sagely One Speaks

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Minister Khaw: News of the defective trains could have caused undue panic

Transport Minister Khaw Boon Wan has declared that the news of the trains could have caused undue panic during a briefing at the Bishan Depot on Tuesday (July 12).

The Transport Minister broke his week-long silence at the briefing, in an attempt to assure the public through the media that the issue of defective trains from China has been dealt with professionally, and with full public interest in mind after declining to comment on the news for a week.


Mr Khaw said that going public for something that was "not a major event" might have caused unnecessary panic to the layman, noting that to engineers, not all cracks are the same.

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Train Cracks Cause Embarrassment, Not Panic

There are many times I wonder if a prerequisite to being a politician is having a screw loose in one’s head. I’m sure we can identify numerous instances when the messages coming from them just seem completely illogical, and we stop in our tracks (pun intended) to wonder what did we just hear.

According to Transport Minister Khaw Boon Wan, going public for something that was “not a major event”, referring to the hairline cracks found on SMRT trains, would have caused unnecessary panic to the layman.

May I please ask, did anyone panic when Hong Kong news agency FactWire broke the news? Did anyone avoid taking SMRT trains the next day because of this news?

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MOT Minister Khaw says non transparency can prevent undue panic

The issue of 26 defective China-made SMRT trains has been making headlines since 5 July after this was reported by investigative journalism site Factwire.

Since then, MOT, LTA and SMRT with the assistance of MSM (not stat board) have continued to issue statements as if social media did not exist: it was right to withhold information of public interest.

But one week after failing to win over the public, butterfly and bad pun lover Minister Khaw Boon Wan has now been tasked with convincing the public that black is white. (watch the following entertaining video)

related:
LTA ditches train parts made by Longkou Conglin
Going public would've caused undue panic, Khaw explains MOT’s decision

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Khaw Defends Decision to Keep Quiet about Train Cracks because Public would Cow Beh Cow Bu


Transport Minister Khaw Boon Wan has defended the decision to hide the issue of cracked trains from the public.



He said that that going public for something that was “not a major event” might have caused unnecessary panic to the layman.

Mr Khaw added that to engineers, not all cracks are the same, and that the Land Transport Authority would have gone public if there were safety and capacity issues at play.



Minister Khaw Boon Wan on the news of MRT train return


Responding to media queries at the Bishan Deport today (July 12), Transport Minister Khaw Boon Wan admitted that he knew about the faulty China-made trains and covered it up to “avoid undue panic”. Calling the defects “non-major”, Transport Minister decided that it is better not to let the public know about the defective trains:



“Trains were being returned to China for repairs due to hairline cracks could have caused undue panic. Going public for something that was not a major event might have caused unnecessary panic to the layman, noting that to engineers, not all cracks are the same. If all cracks are have to be reported when they do not cause any of those safety issues then they have to think about what is the impact on the ground. Looking back I think it’s understandable. We learn as we go along, sometimes even routine matters can be spun out of control as it happened in this case.

So if the rectification requires us to take away too many trains … I’m quite sure Ministry Of Transport together with LTA would have also decided even though it’s not a safety issue, because it will affect availability of trains, I’m sure they will go public and explain why, we will now have to slow down on our program of increasing the capacity.”


Land Transport Authority should have reported earlier

Transport Minister has now issued a statement to explain the delay in disclosure of the hardline cracks in the MRT trains.

The Land Transport Authority should have disclosed it much earlier, rather than wait for the news to be reported from the Hong Kong media.

By hiding the fact for some time, it has caused the public to distruct the government.

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Controversy over trains and troubled waters

TRAINS… as in the 26 China-made SMRT trains that were discovered to contain cracks and have to be sent back to China for fixing – you can read our reports here, here, and here. After a week since news broke last Tuesday (July 5), Transport Minister Khaw Boon Wan finally broke his silence on the matter yesterday (July 12) by calling the returns a “routine matter” that had been “mis-spun into a controversy”.

He said in a press conference that the cracks were not made public because they did not pose any safety risks and would not affect the capacity of the North-South and East-West MRT lines. Five trains have been fixed and one is currently undergoing repairs. Twenty of the trains continue to be in service.

Mr Khaw also tried to shift attention to the news report itself, which was published by FactWire, an investigative website based in Hong Kong. He said it was possible that the report was motivated by “factions in Hong Kong who wanted to cause some difficulties for mainland China”, adding: “Unfortunately, we become a convenient bullet and collateral damage.”

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China manufacturer for MTR secretly recalls 35 SMRT subway trains after cracks found
In the early morning of June 12, the defective trains are transported out of SMRT's Bishan Depot. (Photo: FactWire)

Chinese-made subway trains in Singapore have cracks in their car bodies and key structural components, resulting in 35 trains being shipped back to their manufacturer in Qingdao for replacement, FactWire can reveal.

Details of the defects and the recalls have been kept secret in both Singapore and China. The same mainland manufacturer is responsible for manufacturing nine trains for the Guangzhou-Shenzhen-Hong Kong Express Rail Link (XLR) and 93 trains for the Mass Transit Railway Corporation’s (MTR Corporation) four urban lines.

A source from the mainland railway industry told FactWire that Singapore’s subway operator SMRT Trains Ltd (SMRT) was secretly shipping defective trains back to mainland China for replacement and repair by manufacturer CSR Sifang Locomotive & Rolling Stock Company Ltd  (CSR Sifang).

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Why are MRT trains being shipped back to manufacturer?

Defects were found during a check of new trains manufactured by Kawasaki Heavy Industries and CSR Sifang in late 2013. There were a few hairline cracks on the car-body. These are superficial cracks (like those that show up on the walls of a new house). They are not structural cracks and are not safety-critical. No cracks were found on other train components after further inspections.

Are these defects dangerous? The defects are hairline cracks (due to material impurity that occurred during manufacturing) and are not safety-critical. They do not affect the train’s systems, performance or passengers’ safety.

Are the trains still under warranty? Yes, they are still under the manufacturer’s warranty. As such, the Land Transport Authority (LTA) is sending the trains in small batches back to the manufacturer for rectification. This is the appropriate thing to do to ensure we get the value for our money.

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Land Transport Authority – We Keep Your World Moving

The Land Transport Authority would like to address some of the issues related to 26 North-South and East-West Lines (NSEWL) trains that have been the subject of recent media and online discussion.

LTA awarded Contract 151A in 2009 to Kawasaki Heavy Industries and CSR Sifang to design, manufacture, and deliver 35 new trains for the North-South and East-West Lines (NSEWL). The trains were progressively put in service from February 2011, following rigorous testing on their safety and reliability.

Prior to the commencement of passenger service, all new trains arriving in Singapore are put through testing and commissioning. The same was done for the KHI-CSR Sifang trains, during which there was an incident where the train battery housing cover lid flew open due to a build-up of gases on one train. The manufacturer took immediate action to replace its supplier and improved the design of the battery box for all affected trains.

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SMRT Yesterday 02:41

Some of you may have seen posts about our trains being shipped back to the manufacturer due to structural defects.

Our engineers discovered that 26 of the 35 trains delivered by the manufacturer had cracks in the structure connecting the car body and the bogie after they were delivered in 2013. Since then, we have been working closely with LTA and the manufacturer to rectify the issue. The defective trains, which are still under warranty, will be repaired by the manufacturer.

To ensure that the trains are safe for passenger service at all times, we have been monitoring the defects closely. A monthly safety assessment is also conducted by LTA and the manufacturer before each train is put into service.

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26 China-made MRT trains sent back to fix defects
The recall of the trains will result in an immediate shortfall in capacity and could affect Singapore's plans to raise its rail service standards. SMRT currently has 141 trains for the North-South and East-West lines. FOTO: FACTWIRE NEWS AGENCY

According to reports by online news portal FactWire, some of the trains had windows shattering repeatedly, and in 2011, 1 of the trains' Chinese-made uninterruptible power supply batteries exploded during repair.

While there had been no reported cases of injury, CSR Sifang has reportedly replaced all the batteries with made-in-Germany batteries. These batteries supply power for lights and ventilation during a breakdown.

FactWire said cracks were also found in structural components of trains, including the sub-floor -- a compartment under the passenger floor holding the equipment box and electrical wires -- & parts connecting the car body to the bogie, the latter having the most serious problems.

related:
Consortium that built MRT trains 'had top score for quality'
Hairline cracks in 26 MRT trains made in China
Hairline cracks in China-made trains due to manufacturing process: LTA
5 of 26 defective China-made trains now fixed, says LTA
'Impurities in material' caused cracks in China-made MRT trains, says LTA
HK seeks more checks on new trains from same firm
Qingdao Sifang breaks silence, saying trains were still safe

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Defects on SMRT trains 'not safety-critical', to be repaired by manufacturer: LTA
File foto of an SMRT train pulling up alongside a platform station in Singapore

FactWire had reported on Tuesday that China-made trains in Singapore showed "cracks in their car bodies and key structural components". As a result, 35 trains were shipped to their manufacturer for Qingdao for replacement.

FactWire claimed the details of the defects and recalls were "kept secret in both Singapore and China", & that the defective trains were stored at SMRT's Bishan Depot. According to the FactWire report, 2 train cars wrapped in green covers were moved out of the depot early on Jun 12, and arrived at CSR Sifang's factory in Qingdao, China on Jun 25. The report also alleged that "serious malfunctions on the SMRT's North South Line, which the SMRT suspected were caused by C151A trains" occurred in Dec 2011.

The news portal also uploaded a video on its Facebook page, purportedly showing the defective trains being transported to Jurong Port to be shipped overseas. 

related: No brackets added: Structural integrity of defective trains unaffected

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Cracks in 26 defective SMRT trains due to 'localised impurity': LTA
An example of a 142mm hairline crack found. Photo: Land Transport Authority

News of the defective trains first broke on Tuesday when FactWire, a crowd-funded investigative journalism site, released an extensive report with photos and video footage of several trains being shipped out of SMRT's Bishan depot for Jurong Port, before being transported to China.

The trains in the spotlight are the C151A-model trains supplied by Japanese train-maker Kawasaki Heavy Industries and the China-based CSR Sifang. The 2 firms, together with Kawasaki’s Singapore subsidiary, had bagged a S$368 million contract in 2009 to supply 22 six-car C151A trains meant for the North-South and East-West Lines (NSEWL). SMRT subsequently ordered another 13 trains of the same model.

In 2014, the same consortium was also awarded a S$749 million contract to supply 91 new four-car trains -- of a different model -- for the Thomson-East Coast Line.

related:
Consortium in train controversy breaks silence
Cracks in 26 defective SMRT trains due to 'localised impurity': LTA
Defects on new SMRT trains did not affect safety: Ministry of Transport
LTA buys 12 more trains for North-South and East-West lines

HK govt warned on defective Singapore trains, report alleges

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Defective MRT trains sent back to China manufacturer
CRACKED: Online news portal FactWire said this photo is of the defective trains being transported to China. FOTO: YOUTUBE/HONG KONG FREE PRESS

The defects were brought to light after online news portal FactWire reported yesterday that several train cars were seen being transported from SMRT's Bishan Depot to Jurong Port, and were believed to have been shipped to Qingdao, China, last month.

The report also alleged that these defects could have a serious impact.

FactWire quoted former Kowloon-Canton Railway Corporation acting Chief Executive Officer Samuel Lai, who was reported as saying that train components usually cracked due to age.

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26 China-made MRT trains shipped back for repairing of defects

News that the trains were being sent back was 1st reported by online news portal FactWire, which reported that some of the trains had glass next to the passenger seats that repeatedly shattered. Cracks were also reportedly found in the trains' sub-floor, a compartment under the passenger floor holding the equipment box and electrical wires.

The HK-based investigative news agency also reported that one of the trains' uninterruptible power supply batteries exploded during repair in 2011. While there were no injuries, the manufacturers reportedly replaced the China-made batteries with German-made ones.

SMRT also suspected that malfunctions along the North-South Line in 2011 had been caused by the C151A trains, and subsequently reduced the frequency of the trains and asked to delay payment for extra trains of the same series, FactWire reported.

related:
US-made LRT trains also had cracks
Train cracks a telltale sign of inferior materials used

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5 of 26 defective China-made trains now fixed, says LTA

Of the 26 defective MRT trains, 5 have had their aluminium car-body shells replaced after being sent back to China for repairs. A 6th was sent back recently and starting from next year, 2 will be sent back each time instead of one, to speed up rectification works.

A routine inspection in July 2013 had uncovered hairline cracks on the surface of the car-body bolster -- an aluminium alloy structure beneath the train carriage.

The Land Transport Authority (LTA) yesterday said the replacements - which can take up to 4 months for each 6-carriage train - are under way for the 6th train.

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Singapore’s SMRT returns Chinese metro trains

SINGAPORE metro operator SMRT is shipping 26 of its 35 new C151A trains back to Chinese manufacturer CRRC Sifang for rectification after structural defects were discovered on the six-car sets.

SMRT placed a $S 368m ($US 272.7m) order with Kawasaki Heavy Industries and CSR Sifang (now CRRC Sifang) in 2009 for 22 of the trains for use on its North-South and East-West lines, which was followed by an order for 13 further sets in 2011. The trains began to enter service in 2011 with delivery completed in September 2014.

However, Hong Kong-based news agency Factwire reported that SMRT is now returning the trains, which are still under warranty, with five reportedly repaired since 2015. Photos on its website show individual cars loaded and onto the back of lorries and covered in green tarpaulins as they were transported in the early morning of June 12 from SMRT's Bishan Depot to Jurong Port.
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Did China Firm ‘Secretly Recall’ Defective Singapore Trains?

Over the past few days, Singapore has been rocked by allegations that a Chinese manufacturer may have “secretly” recalled defective subway trains from the city-state with the complicity of its officials, threatening to fuel popular frustrations about the state of public transportation.

In 2009, China Southern Railway (CSR) Qingdao Sifang Locomotive and Rolling Stock Company and Kawasaki Heavy Industries were awarded a 22 billion yen ($217 million) contract to work with the Land Transport Authority (LTA) of Singapore to supply 22 six-car trains for the North-South and East-West lines of Singapore’s Mass Rapid Transit (MRT) system. The firms were also awarded another similar contract in 2014. Though each contract specified the exact division of labor between the firms, in general Kawasaki was responsible for the overall project design, procurement, and some manufacturing, while Sifang would be in charge of manufacturing, final fitting, assembly, and factory testing.

On Jul 5, the Hong Kong-based FactWire News Agency published an exclusive story with a source alleging that SMRT was “secretly shipping defective trains back to mainland China” for replacement and repair by Sifang. FactWire said its reporters had first witnessed two train cars wrapped in green covering being moved out of SMRT’s Bishan Depot at 1 am on June 12 and arriving at 3 am at Jurong Port with preparations clearly being made for their transport. CSR Sifang staff confirmed to reporters that the train had arrived at the factory on June 25 from Singapore, and the reporters themselves verified this independently after seeing the trains wrapped in the same covering with similar markings as well.

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Singapore sends faulty subway cars back to China

The Chinese company won the contract in Singapore together with Japan's Kawasaki Heavy Industries, which has been providing it with technical assistance.

CSR Sifang has also received rolling stock orders from Hong Kong and other places. The recent incident could impact its future business strategy.

In early June, an American company terminated a joint venture with China Railway that was to build a high-speed rail link in the U.S. West Coast. Chinese companies have also faced delays and revisions to rail projects in Thailand and Indonesia.

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MBTA's Chinese train supplier faulted for shoddy work in Singapore

A Chinese train manufacturer that's building 284 subway cars for the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority is running into problems with one of its customers in Asia.

The Republic of Singapore is shipping back 26 metro trains made by CSR Qingdao Sifang Locomotive, a subsidiary of China’s state-owned CRRC, because the trains have cracks in the structure linking the car body to the undercarriage, according to the Financial Times. CSR Corp. and China CNR Corp. combined last year to form CRRC Corp.

In 2014, the MBTA signed a deal with CNR MA Corp. for the delivery of $566.6 million in rail cars for its Orange and Red subway lines.

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Problems With Train Cars In Singapore Raise Questions For CTA

The Singapore train cars need their whole bodies replaced, according to Singapore’s transportation agency. They’re going back to a Chinese factory for repairs.

In March, the CTA gave the same manufacturer, CSR Sifang, a $1.3 billion contract.

The CTA responded to questions about the Singapore trains with an emailed statement that the local agency’s contract, “includes a number of quality controls for the new rail cars.” Those include inspection upon delivery and a warranty.

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Mainland manufacturer for MTR secretly recalls 35 trains from Singapore due to cracks
Trains wrapped in green covering could be seen inside the factory in Chengyang district. Photo: FactWire

Chinese-made subway trains in Singapore have cracks in their car bodies and key structural components, resulting in 35 trains being shipped back to their manufacturer in Qingdao for replacement, FactWire can reveal.

Details of the defects and the recalls have been kept secret in both Singapore and China. The same mainland manufacturer is responsible for manufacturing nine trains for the Guangzhou-Shenzhen-Hong Kong Express Rail Link (XLR) and 93 trains for the Mass Transit Railway Corporation’s (MTR Corporation) four urban lines.

A source from the mainland railway industry told FactWire that Singapore’s subway operator SMRT Trains Ltd (SMRT) was secretly shipping defective trains back to mainland China for replacement and repair by manufacturer CSR Sifang Locomotive & Rolling Stock Company Ltd  (CSR Sifang).

related: HK gov received complaint of S'pore MRT train problems during 2015 tender

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The Chinese company making Boston and Chicago’s new subway cars has big problems in Singapore

Chinese train manufacturer CSR Sifang has run into serious quality problems in a major project in Singapore. The city-state’s transportation authority said cracks have appeared in dozens of train cars made by CSR Sifang, where the cars attach to the “bogie” or undercarriage.

26 out of 35 railcars made by a joint venture between CSR Sifang and Kawasaki Heavy Industries have defects, Singapore’s SMRT Trains said Tuesday (Jul 5).

The Singapore government’s announcement comes after Hong Kong news Agency FactWire reported that trains were being sent back from Singapore to CSR Sifang’s factory in Qingdao, China, for replacement. The crowd-funded news organization tracked cars, shrouded in green wrapping, from Singapore’s Bishan Depot to a Singapore port to Qingdao.

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Singapore returns faulty trains to China for repair

Singapore has shipped 26 defective Chinese-made metro trains back to their manufacturer for repair after discovering cracks in the structure linking the car body to the undercarriage, in a blow to China’s ambitions to win export deals for its rail equipment.

Hairline cracks were found in late 2013 following the delivery of new trains by CSR Qingdao Sifang Locomotive, a subsidiary of China’s main state-owned rolling stock company CRRC, Singapore’s ministry of transport said.

Singapore public transit operator SMRT said in a statement that 26 of the 35 trains delivered by the manufacturer, known as CSR Sifang, had cracks in the structure connecting the car body and the framework for the wheels, which is known as a bogie.

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MTR seeks info on faulty Singapore trains

MTR Corporation Limited is seeking further information from the mainland manufacturer of nine trains for the Hong Kong Express Rail following reports that Singapore returned 35 trains for repair and replacement after cracks were found on them.

According to FactWire, the defective trains were manufactured by CSR Sifang Locomotive and Rolling Stock Company Limited and were secretly shipped back to the mainland by Singapore's subway operator SMRT Trains Limited.

Two train cars were moved out of the SMRT's Bishan Depot on June 12 and arrived in Qingdao on June 25.

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MTR Corporation in spotlight amid revelations faulty trains were secretly shipped from Singapore to mainland for repairs

Transport minister Anthony Cheung Bing-leung has told the MTR Corporation to report on the quality of nine new high-speed trains and another 93 urban trains it purchased from a mainland manufacturer.

This came after 35 faulty subway trains produced by the same firm were reportedly secretly shipped back from Singapore to the mainland for repairs.

Cheung raised the concerns after reports that the mainland-made trains in Singapore had cracks in their ­bodies and key structural components and they were sent back to their maker in Qingdao for repairs.

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Chinese manufacturer quietly recalls 35 defective subway trains from Singapore

Over the past few years, China has consistently and rightfully flaunted their train manufacturing technology around the world. From successfully connecting Western China to Iran, as well as Beijing to Hong Kong, to building a second train connecting Tibet to the rest of China, they have gained their bragging rights and lead the world with over 19,000 kilometers of track.

However, China's track record is becoming less pristine anymore. It was recently revealed that on June 12th, 35 Mass Rapid Transit (MRT) trains in Singapore manufactured by Shandong-based CSR Sifang Locomotive & Rolling Stock Company Ltd had cracks on the bodies and key structural parts and were shipped back to Qingdao to be repaired, FactWire reports. Both Singapore and China attempted to hush up the situation.

At around 1 a.m., trucks carrying defective trains were escorted by police from Bishan Depot to Jurong Port. They were loaded on a cargo ship for a 10-day journey to CSR Sifang's factory located back in China. Thank god there were no cracks in the ship.

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Mainland company's train carriages defective, report says

A mainland manufacturer producing train compartments for Hong Kong's express rail to Guangzhou has had those produced for Singapore rejected and sent back to China, because cracks were detected, a report says.

Local news agency FactWire reported today that 35 compartments that were sent to Singapore were returned to the CSR Qingdao Sifang Company for replacement. The report said the problems that were detected included cracks on important parts of the compartments and fragmented glass windows. The mainland manufacturer is due to deliver nine compartments to Hong Kong later this year which will be used on the express rail link. The MTR Corporation has also bought 96 compartments from the company that are meant to be used for the local rail network. Deliveries are due from 2018.

In response, the corporation said the materials used for making the 96 compartments were from different companies. But it did not say if it was aware of the problems that were uncovered in Singapore.

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SMRT to Ship Back 26 Trains to Chinese Manufacturer: Report

Public transport operator SMRT Corporation is allegedly shipping back 26 out of the 35 China-made trains it is using due to structural defects.

The issues, which were found in 2013, were revealed after a Hong Kong news outlet reported that trains were "secreted" away to be sent back to its manufacturer. Furthermore, a crowd-funded news site called FactWire revealed that the defects were apparent after it began operating on the North-South and East-West lines.

The issues cited include repeatedly shattering glass panels because of shoddy workmanship and exploding China-made uninterruptible power supply batteries during repairs. These batteries have been reportedly replaced with Germany-made batteries.

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SMRT trains recalled by China manufacturer due to defects
Yahoo Singapore file photo of an SMRT train car under service

A Chinese manufacturer is secretly recalling 35 SMRT trains due to cracks and structural defects found in them, according to a report by FactWire of Hong Kong on Tuesday (5 Jul).

A source from the Chinese railway industry told the Hong Kong news agency that Singapore train operator SMRT was shipping the defective trains back to manufacturer CSR Sifang Locomotive & Rolling Stock Company for replacement and repair. According to sources, the trains were stored at SMRT’s Bishan Depot.

Around 1am on 12 June, FactWire said its reporters saw two train cars wrapped in green covering being transported out of the depot. Around 3am, the train cars arrived in Jurong Port. The reporters used a drone camera and spotted six train cars in one corner of the port.

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China's CRRC to step up checks after Singapore returns metro trains for repair

Chinese trainmaker CRRC Corp said on Wednesday it would step up quality checks on its products after Singapore shipped 26 of its metro trains back for repair just three years after they were delivered.

Singapore's transport operator SMRT Corp Ltd said on Tuesday it was sending the trains back after discovering cracks in the structure connecting the car body to the truck structure underneath, the Straits Times newspaper reported.

The trains, delivered in 2013, were manufactured by CRRC subsidiary CSR Qingdao Sifang Locomotive, which together with Japan's Kawasaki Heavy Industries Ltd, won two contracts in 2009 and 2012 to supply a total of 35 trains for Singapore's metro lines.

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Defective Trains: “Discuss Things Openly, Tell People The Truth”

Surely, there is curiosity, public interest to understand why it took a foreign investigative team to uncover the defective trains before LRT and MOT came out with such well-prepared explanations. Surely, surely, we wish to know, nay, we must know what exactly happened, the works! LTA processes, the chain of events unfolding, the negotiations etc to understand what if any cover-ups for complacency (?), for incompetence (??), for possible corruption (???) might have occurred?

Whilst the minister of transport has direct responsibility, you as DPM, you who preach open discussion and telling the truth, surely you must demand answers for us voters and citizens. How about it, Mr Tharman? Will you see to it that you practise what you preach, ‘discuss things openly, tell people the truth’?

How about starting with these 2 questions:

  • If the defects were not ‘safety-critical’, why was it not discussed openly, told truthfully to us until LTA’s hand was forced by the report of foreign investigative journalists?
  • How is it ‘the appropriate thing to do’ and ‘value for our money’ to settle for rectification instead of new replacements for new trains delivered defective? You mean LTA negotiated such pathetic terms when signing the purchase order? How come?

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LTA’s train fiasco – The perils of the race for the “lowest quote”
Take a look at the financials of KHI [courtesy of Reuters]

For those of you who blame Chinese manufacturing for being notoriously slipshod, take note that this current deal involves Kawasaki Heavy Industries [KHI], a Japanese firm, who has been producing MRT train cars for Singapore since 1986. For this project, KHI teamed up with Chinese manufacturer CSR Sifang, itself part of a larger Chinese state-owned entreprise, to produce the faulty trains.

So LTA engaged a Japanese firm who has been producing good quality MRT trains for Singapore since 1986. Good deal right? Wrong.

Clearly KHI’s not been at its best for quite a few years. So why continue dealing with an aging business? I am told one other criteria for the government’s dealings with private companies is its history of successfully concluded deals with the government. Since KHI’s been doing business with the government for the past three decades, why not continue?

related: How will the MRT train recall impact train service timings?

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LTA says train defects “not safety-critical” but ex-HK CEO says QC of entire manufacturing process under suspicion

After news broke in social media that SMRT was secretly shipping its defective trains back to China for repairs, LTA quickly issued a statement, attempting to reassure the public.

LTA now says that the defects, found on the train body, “are not safety-critical and do not affect the train’s systems or performance”.

“Trains on the rail network are extensively tested to ensure the safety and reliability of the train. Every train also undergoes a comprehensive regime of static and dynamic testing as well as interface testing to ensure its structural and operational integrity. After the testing is completed, the trains are delivered to Singapore for further testing before they are placed for passenger service,” it added.

related:
ST defends LTA’s purchase of PRC trains by saying US ones have cracks too
Workers’ Party files parliamentary questions on defective trains
Defective Trains: “Discuss Things Openly, Tell People The Truth”
‘No brackets, cable-tie can already’ – Netizens ridicule LTA’s explanations
Netizens ask why NEL trains were not moved in the dead of the night
Investigative news agency claims S'pore kept news of defective MRT trains secret
Reditter claims multiple layers of cover-ups in defective trains saga
Secretive LTA and SMRT admit they had delivery of faulty trains
SMRT secretly shipping 35 PRC-made trains back to China for repairs
Train defects reveal deeper problems doing business with PRCs

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Factwire: SMRT secretly shipping defective trains back to manufacturer
Trains being wrapped in green tarpaulin

Acting on a tip-off, Hong Kong-based Factwire conducted an investigation and discovered that SMRT Trains Ltd (SMRT) had secretly been shipping defective trains back to the manufacturer, CSR Sifang Locomotive & Rolling Stock Company Ltd (CSR Sifang) in QingDao, China.

Reporters who worked on the article had claimed that they spotted trains being wrapped in green tarpaulin before moving out of Bishan Depot. In the same article, an unnamed rail veteran was quoted as saying that he has not seen the “entire” train frame being replaced throughout his entire career and described this as a ”serious” problem - manufacturing defects.

Sourced from Singapore and China reportedly revealed to FactWire that problems have been found with these PRC-made C151A trains since they began service in 2011. The trains were of poor quality and the glass next to passenger seats had on multiple occasions shattered due to poor workmanship. Its power supply batteries had also exploded during repairs. While there were no injuries, CSR Sifang replaced all the made in China batteries with German made ones.

related:
Why didn’t the COI into the 2011 MRT debacle pick defects up?
SDP: Govt must answer questions on defective trains sent back to China

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WHY WERE DEFECTIVE PRC-MADE TRAINS KEPT SECRET BY PAP GOVT SINCE 2013?

After almost a month of investigations, FactWire published a report on 5 July on safety issues affecting SMRT trains. The disclosure, after having gone viral, forced our MSM to report on this issue the same day.

According to the Factwire report, besides the issue of cracks on train bodies as reported by MSM:
  • cracks have also been found in “key structural components”
  • the trains are of poor quality
  • the glass next to passenger seats has repeatedly shattered due to shoddy workmanship
  • in 2011, one of the trains’ Chinese-made batteries exploded during repair
  • all China-made batteries were replaced with German-made ones.
The issue of safety has been downplayed by LTA which claims that the defects “are not safety-critical and do not affect the train’s systems or performance”. LTA likens the “hairline cracks” on the car body to superficial cracks on walls of a new house. But walls are not a part of a system subject to daily stress and this is therefore not an apt comparison. Imagine the CEO of an airline issuing this statement: “Passengers should not worry about the hairline cracks found on the body of our planes are not safety-critical”.

related: PPP: DEFECTIVE TRAINS FROM CHINA - MORE MEETS THE EYE

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Train batteries exploded during testing, glass shattered, seat cracked

Although the Singapore government is trying to play down the faults calling them “non-critical”, the history of the maintenance of the defective trains appear to indicate otherwise. According to Hongkong media Apple Daily, the train batteries made in China ever exploded due to a build-up of gas during a test and have to be replaced with German-made batteries. Other mishaps like glass shattering for no reasons and seats cracked also happened during testing.

According to the Hongkong media, the first major train breakdown along North-South Line on Dec 15 to Dec 18 is most probably caused by the China-made trains. After the Singapore authorities inspected the trains, they found numerous cracks in the C151A trains and even the engines were found to be problematic.

Despite having the problem surfaced since 2011, only 5 out of 26 car bodies were replaced today. Transport Minister Khaw Boon Wan, Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong and SMRT CEO Desmond Kwek are avoiding media comments.

related:
SMRT and Singapore Government in cahoots over faulty train cover up
Ministry of Transport and SPH papers on propaganda overdrive

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LTA: Defects of trains not safety-critical, SMRT: Defects will be repaired by 2023

In response to the news of SMRT Trains Ltd (SMRT) secretly sending 35 defective train carriages back to its manufacturer in June, the Land Transport Authority (LTA) has posted on its Facebook page, saying that it had been working closely with the train manufacturer and that the defects are not safety-critical.

Just today, FactWire News Agency, a watchdog news organization released an exclusive report on 35 train carriages belonging to local train operator, SMRT being shipped back to its manufacturer on 12 June due to alleged existing defects.

In its report, FactWire verified and documented the whole transportation after being tipped off by a mainland source in the railway industry that SMRT was secretly shipping defective trains back to mainland China for replacement and repair by manufacturer CSR Sifang Locomotive & Rolling Stock Company Ltd (CSR Sifang).

related:
Workers’ Party to file questions on defective China-trains in Parliament
SDP: Gov must give full account by answering questions on defective trains
People’s Power Party’s statement on defective trains from China
LTA: Trains on North-South and East-West Lines safe for service
Did SMRT and LTA hide defects of China manufactured trains?

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Made-in-China trains spark safety concerns in Hong Kong, US

THE Land Transport Authority (LTA) yesterday (July 6) continued to downplay the significance of returning 26 defective trains back to its Chinese manufacturer even as the news sparked concern in Hong Kong and Chicago, whose transport companies have orders with the same manufacturer, China Southern Railway (CSR) Qingdao Sifang Locomotive.

In a statement released, along with photos of a hairline crack found on the car-body bolster, which is on the undercarriage of the trains, LTA said: “It is not unusual to detect some defects on new trains. We then take appropriate action to have them rectified by the manufacturer.”

“It is not unusual to detect some defects on new trains. We then take appropriate action to have them rectified by the manufacturer.”

related:
Defective trains: $886 million for ‘quality’? LTA responds
35 SMRT trains secretly recalled: HK report
Faulty trains: to tell or not to tell?
Besides rail reliability, what about tracking lift reliability?

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LTA gives fuller details on sending back of MRT trains with defects

The Land Transport Authority (LTA) shared an update on Facebook on Wednesday (July 6) that provided greater detail into their shipping back of train carriages to China.

Things to note from the update:
  • It is the LTA, not SMRT, that purchased the trains. Their contract was awarded to Kawasaki Heavy Industries and CSR Sifang in 2009 for 35 trains. They were progressively put into service from Feb 2013 after “rigorous testing”.
  • Cracks found on 26 trains’ car-bodies were a result of the presence of localised impurities in the aluminium car-body material that were introduced during the manufacturing process. LTA’s engineers, contractors and a third-party assessor TUV Rheinland concurred that the trains were safe to operate. 22 of the 26 trains were in operation at that time.
  • An additional appearance of cracks on the draughtscreen on five of these trains were determined to be caused by errors in installation.
  • The most effective way to rectify the defect was to replace the car-body. The trains were still under warranty, and thus were shipped back at the cost of the contractor.
  • LTA worked with SMRT to ship back trains one at a time to avoid disrupting train operations. Each car-body replacement takes up to four months. Five out of 26 trains have been completed so far, while the rectification of all 26 trains will be completed by 2019.
related:
Consortium that delivered trains with defects awarded 2 subsequent contracts
We summarise WTH is going on with MRT train cars being shipped back to China
MOT explains why 24 MRT trains were shipped back to the manufacturer

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Problems with SMRT’s China-Made Trains Allegedly Started as Early as 2011

China-made C151A trains operated by SMRT allegedly had problems as early as 2011 when they began service.

This was reported by Hong Kong independent investigative news agency, Factwire, which earlier today reported that 35 of SMRT’s trains were quietly shipped back to Qingdao last month due to cracks and other defects.

Factwire reported that multiple sources from mainland China and Singapore have confirmed to that problems have been found with C151A trains since they began service in 2011.

related:
LRT Trains in Service Found to Have Cracks Too
SMRT Trains Allegedly Shipped Back to China due to Cracks & Defects

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Lessons the Government should learn from the SMRT train cracks incident
Drone footage shows six train cars placed in a corner of Jurong Port in Singapore’s western industrial area

We do not know exactly why LTA and SMRT  decided not to make any announcements about the cracks back in July 2013. But on hindsight, it seems that they couldn’t have done any worse had they made some announcements earlier. All their press releases that are coming out in dribs and drabs only now make them seem really defensive. It makes it even harder for Singaporeans to be convinced that the cracks are not something that we should be seriously concerned about.

After all, if it weren’t serious, why not be upfront about it? Why only tell now that someone else has published the story? Given the way things have turned out, you can’t blame Singaporeans for thinking that LTA and SMRT had something to hide. Consequently, you can’t blame Singaporeans for not trusting what LTA is now saying.

And you can’t blame Singaporeans for being angry too. Angry at both the government and at mainstream media. What else is the government hiding from us? What are the mainstream media doing? Can we still trust the mainstream media to report news that matter to us? Or are they just a mouthpiece of the government?

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SMRT buy train from vendor in China with "guarantee no spoil" sign
But China is read from right to left
read more

Full Coverage:
HK govt 'told about train cracks before it awarded contract'
LTA: No brackets added: Structural integrity of defective trains unaffected
Train cracks a telltale sign of inferior materials used
Train cracks cast doubts on China's rail ambitions
CRRC, building a Springfield rail car plant, faces quality concerns in S'pore
MTR comes under fire after admitting it knew about faulty trains
Defective SMRT trains were still fit and safe for service: LTA
Singapore returns, Phl keeps faulty Chinese MRT trains
Netizens ask why NEL trains were not moved in the dead of the night
'Impurities in material' caused cracks on MRT trains
Singapore sends faulty subway cars back to China
LTA: Trains on North-South and East-West Lines safe for service
MBTA's Chinese train supplier faulted for shoddy work in Singapore
Problems With Train Cars In Singapore Raise Questions For CTA
Cracks in 26 defective SMRT trains due to 'localised impurity': LTA
Trainmaker to step up checks

Did SMRT and LTA hide defects of China manufactured trains?
SMRT secretly shipping 35 PRC-made trains back to China for repairs
26 China-made MRT trains sent back to fix defects
Hairline cracks in 26 MRT trains made in China

35 SMRT trains secretly recalled
Defective MRT trains sent back to China manufacturer
Hairline cracks in China-made trains due to manufacturing process: LTA
HK seeks more checks on new trains from same firm
Secretive LTA and SMRT admit they had delivery of faulty trains
Defects on SMRT trains 'not safety-critical', to be repaired by manufacturer
LTA: Trains on North-South and East-West Lines safe for service
Cracks in 26 defective SMRT trains due to 'localised impurity': LTA
Did China Firm 'Secretly Recall' Defective Singapore Trains?
Defects on new SMRT trains did not affect safety: Ministry of Transport
People's Power Party's statement on defective trains from China
LTA says defects “not safety-critical” but ex-HK CEO says QC under suspicion
Singapore returns faulty trains to China
Govt must give a full account by answering questions on defective trains
26 China-made MRT trains shipped back for repairing of defects
LTA: Defects of trains not safety-critical,SMRT, Defects will be repaired by 2023
26 trains SMRT ordered from China sent back for repairs
MTR seeks info on faulty Singapore trains
MTRC spotlight amid revelations faulty trains were secretly shipped from S'pore
Chinese manufacturer quietly recalls 35 defective subway trains from S'pore
Singapor rejects 26 made-in-China 'faulty' trains
Mainland company's train carriages defective, report says
SMRT to Ship Back 26 Trains to Chinese Manufacturer: Report
Made-in-China trains spark safety concerns in Hong Kong, US
HK seeks more checks on new trains from same firm
Hairline cracks in China-made trains due to manufacturing process: LTA
SMRT to Ship Back 26 Trains to Chinese Manufacturer: Report
Defective SMRT trains were still fit and safe for service
Singapore returns faulty trains to China
Cracks in 26 defective SMRT trains due to 'localised impurity': LTA
Business model overhaul key to improving train services
Why are MRT trains being shipped back to manufacturer?
Car-body replacement for five out of 26 defective trains complete: LTA
Defective SMRT trains were still fit and safe for service: LTA
HK seeks more checks on new trains from same firm
26 China-made MRT trains sent back to fix defects
Singapore returns faulty trains to China
Hairline cracks in China-made trains due to manufacturing process: LTA
Company making Boston&Chicago new subway cars has big problems in S'pore
CRRC to step up checks after Singapore returns metro trains for repair
Defective MRT trains sent back to China manufacturer
Reditter claims multiple layers of cover-ups in defective trains saga
Defective trains manufactured by China 'not safety-critical'
MTR to quiz Chinese manufacturer about train quality after Singapore revelation
Did China Firm 'Secretly Recall' Defective Singapore Trains?
FactWire News Agency
We summarise WTH is going on with MRT train cars being shipped
FactWire News Agency 傳真社 - Facebook
Investigative news agency claims Singapore kept news of defective
FactWire - YouTube
35 SMRT trains recalled by China manufacturer due to defects: report



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