Thursday, 12 November 2015

The Historic Ma-Xi Summit


The world’s eye on the Xi-Ma meeting

MEDIA across the world had kept their eyes fixated upon the Xi-Ma meeting long before it took place on Nov 7 in Singapore.

BBC News was one of many other media outlets that put together a list of questions both President Ma Ying-jeou and President Xi Jinping might raise when they met. Others – from ST in Singapore to Philstar in the Philippines to New York Times (NYT) – used this opportunity to give their readers some cultural education behind the much-awaited handshake between both leaders through historical timelines illustrating the relationship between mainland China and Taiwan.

And when the historic handshake finally took place, the news rang out across global news channels. ST and The New Paper went straight into reporting how the meeting dwelt on several key discussion points. Several other news channels took a similarly neutral stance in reporting, describing the meeting as a historic handshake between the leaders of China and Taiwan – the first in nearly seven decades as reported in The Guardian. Sky News (Australia), The Wall Street Journal and Macau Daily Times.


Leaders of China and Taiwan meet for first time in nearly seven decades
Xi Jinping and Ma Ying-jeou began historic summit and agree to split the bill for dinner

The leaders of China and Taiwan met for the first time in almost seven decades on Saturday as Xi Jinping and Ma Ying-jeou began a historic summit in Singapore with a minute-long handshake. “Nothing can separate us,” Xi told his Taiwanese counterpart in brief public remarks following the handshake. “We are one family … We are brothers who are still connected by our flesh even if our bones are broken.

Ma told Xi both sides had been working “to replace conflict with dialogue ... We follow different political systems, but we have developed military and economic cooperation,” he said.

The meeting between Communist party chief Xi and Nationalist president Ma was the first time two such leaders had come together since Mao Zedong founded the People’s Republic of China in 1949. The last encounter between communist and nationalist leaders came in August 1945, when Mao and Chiang Kai-shek came together in Chongqing for seven weeks of talks.

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Historic Xi-Ma Handshake Wins Mixed Reviews Amid Taiwan Election
An historic handshake in Singapore between the presidents of China and Taiwan this weekend was welcomed by the United States and effusively praised by Chinese state media, but greeted with skepticism in Taipei amid an election being fought in part over relations with Beijing

China’s communist leader Xi Jinping spoke of ties of brotherly ties across the Taiwan Strait, an old cold War frontier, as he met his democratically elected Taiwan counterpart Ma Ying-jeou in Singapore on Saturday.

“The 66-year history of cross-Strait relations testifies that no matter how great the difficulty, no matter how many risks there are, no force can pull us apart,” Xi told Ma. “We are brothers, connected by flesh even if our bones are broken, we are a family whose blood is thicker than water,” he added. "Even though this is the first meeting, we feel like old friends," Ma told the Chinese president.

"Behind us is history stretching for 60 years. Now before our eyes there are fruits of conciliation instead of confrontation."

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Xi, Ma take first step towards peace
Activists protest against the Singapore meeting between Taiwan’s president Ma Ying-jeou and his Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping in Taipei, Taiwan, on Saturday. Leaders of the political rival nations are meeting for the first time in more than 60 years. (Reuters)

Pesident Xi Jinping of China met with oresident Ma Ying-jeou of Taiwan on Saturday in the first-ever encounter between leaders of the neighbours and longtime rivals, an act both sides described as a breakthrough gesture meant to promote peace and mutual prosperity.

Xi and Ma began their brief talks with a handshake that went on for more than a minute, with both men smiling broadly for the hundreds of reporters at the Shangri-La Hotel in Singapore. The meeting is a high point in the two leaders' efforts to bridge the divisions of civil war and decades of animosity. Xi said the people of China and Taiwan were compatriots, "one family with blood that is thicker than water."

"We are seated together here today so that the tragedies of history will not be repeated, so that the gains from peaceful development across the strait will not be won and again lost, so that compatriots on both sides of the strait continue making peaceful and tranquil lives, and so that succeeding generations can share a beautiful future." As the meeting began, Ma laid out several proposals for improving relations between China and Taiwan.


Welcomes new era for cross-Straits relations
The remarkable Xi-Ma meeting has just concluded, but it ushers in new eras for Xi Jinping and Ma Ying-jeou. Since publication of The Message to Compatriots in Taiwan in 1979, both sides have endorsed the Wang-Koo talks and Hu-Lian talks

The Wang-Koo talks allowed for consultations on cross-Strait relations. The Hu-Lian talks established greater progress on relations, while the Xi-Ma meeting highlighted a major success  on stronger cross-Strait ties. Ma endorsed the "1992 Consensus" at his meeting with Xi.

Ma said both sides have reached a consensus on the "one China" principle in November 1992 that sustains present-day peacekeeping efforts. He clarified the meaning of the "1992 Consensus."

The core clarification is the "one China" principle, which has overlapped with Xi's frank view that he expressed in close-door exchanges with Ma. Xi said any issue and question must comply with the "one-China" principle.

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International community hails Xi-Ma meeting as inspiring event

The historic meeting between Xi Jinping and Ma Ying-jeou in Singapore is an inspiring event and the high-level dialogue will be a powerful boost to relations between the two sides of the Taiwan Strait, foreign government agencies and experts said.

Amid intensive attention from across the globe, Xi and Ma met on Saturday afternoon in the first meeting between leaders of the two sides of the Taiwan Strait since 1949.

During the meeting, the two leaders acknowledged major achievements made in peaceful development of cross-Strait relations since 2008. Both sides agreed to continue to stick to the 1992 Consensus, consolidate common political ground, promote peaceful development of cross-Strait relations and safeguard peace and stability of the Taiwan Strait.

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How an 80-second handshake could add years to Xi's reign
Chinese newspapers cover the historic China-Taiwan summit

BEIJING -- The recent meeting between the leaders of China and Taiwan was a historic moment in cross-strait relations. Years from now, historians may also see it as the moment Chinese President Xi Jinping ensured an extra-long reign for himself.

Xi and Taiwan's President Ma Ying-jeou on Nov. 7 held the first top-level summit since the two sides split in 1949, following a civil war between Communists and Nationalists. Meeting in Singapore, Xi extended his right hand to Ma with a smile.

The handshake lasted for some 80 seconds -- stirring speculation among analysts versed in Chinese politics.

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China-Taiwan meeting: Awkward questions Xi and Ma could ask
The Chinese civil war ended with a Communist victory and the defeated Nationalists went to Taiwan

On Saturday, for the first time since their bitter split at the end of the Chinese civil war in 1949, the leaders of China and Taiwan will meet.

This is on a par with US President Barack Obama meeting with Cuba's Raul Castro except, unlike Washington and Havana, the two sides still haven't normalised relations. In fact they haven't even signed a peace treaty and in 66 years they have taken very different paths.

No agreements will be signed, no joint statements made, but China's Xi Jinping and Taiwan's Ma Ying-jeou will have an hour-long meeting and a casual dinner afterwards. It could get awkward and here are some of the questions that could crop up.

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When Leaders of Taiwan and China Meet, Even Tiny Gestures Will Be Parsed
Taiwan protesters took issue with President Ma Ying-jeou on Wednesday ahead of his meeting with China's president, Xi Jinping. Credit Pichi Chuang/Reuters

Xi Jinping has several titles: president of China, general secretary of the Communist Party and sometimes even Dada, a name that is translated as “Uncle” or “Daddy.” When he meets with President Ma Ying-jeou of Taiwan on Saturday in Singapore, he will simply be “Mister.”

So will Mr. Ma.

The two “misters” are among the most significant symbols of the complicated protocol around the historic meeting of the leaders. What the men call each other, what flags or symbols appear and even who reaches out to shake whose hand and how will all be parsed for meaning in relations between the two sides.

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China’s Xi Jinping and Taiwan’s Ma Ying-jeou Meet

Meeting is the first between leaders of the two sides since Taiwan and China split in 1949

The leaders of China and Taiwan met for the first time in more than six decades, capping a robust but far from stable engagement between the historical antagonists.

Presidents Xi Jinping of China and Ma Ying-jeou of Taiwan shook hands and waved before the media and then met in a function room of a hotel in the Southeast Asian  island chose as neutral ground.


XI, MA MEET FOR 1ST TIME, SHAKE HANDS
Chinese President Xi Jinping, right, and Taiwanese President Ma Ying-jeou, left, shake hands at the Shangri-la Hotel on Saturday

The leaders of China and Taiwan met Saturday for the first time since the formerly bitter Cold War foes split amid civil war 66 years ago, and though no concrete agreement resulted, both hailed the meeting as a sign of a new stability in relations.

Chinese President Xi Jinping and Taiwanese President Ma Ying-jeou came together on neutral ground in the Southeast Asian city-state of Singapore, walking toward each other in a hotel ballroom in front of a backdrop of yellow — a traditional color of Chinese emperors.

The two men smiled broadly as they shook hands for more than one minute, turning slightly to the side to accommodate a host of photojournalists in the ballroom. No national flags were present — a necessary work-around to overcome China’s refusal to recognize Taiwan’s sovereignty or its government’s formal legitimacy — and the two men were referred to merely as “Mr. Xi” and “Mr. Ma” to further reduce the chances of bruised sensitivities.

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MA-XI MEETING: Ma is sacrificing Taiwan’s national interests

Taiwan Solidarity Union (TSU) Chairman Huang Kun-hui (黃昆輝) yesterday criticized President Ma Ying-jeou’s (馬英九) decision to meet with Chinese President Xi Jinping (習近平), saying he is “sacrificing Taiwan’s national interests for personal reputation.”

At a press conference at the TSU headquarters in Taipei, Huang accused Ma of breaking a promise he made in 2011 while running for re-election that he would not meet with China’s leader during his second term.

“Ma is sacrificing Taiwan’s national interests for his reputation, and the opaque decision making process is defying both the legislature and the public,” Huang said, adding that the legislature must keep an eye on Ma and keep him in check after a new president is elected on Jan. 16.


Ma defends significance of meeting with Xi

In response to criticism over his meeting in Singapore with Chinese President Xi Jinping (習近平), President Ma Ying-jeou (馬英九) defended his performance while on board a flight back to Taiwan, which arrived at Taiwan Taoyuan International Airport early yesterday morning.

During the flight, Ma told reporters that the most significant result of his meeting with Xi was that leaders from the two sides of the Taiwan Strait had finally met and expressed their willingness to jointly discuss relevant issues.

“There are too many problems across the Strait that need to be dealt with. While a number of them have been resolved over the past few years, there are still many left, which is why we require a communication platform at a higher level,” Ma said, adding that the meeting was just a first step.

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Xi-Ma meeting writes new historic chapter
On November 7, Xi Jinping and Ma Ying-jeou, the top leaders across the Taiwan Straits held a historic meeting at the Shangri-La Hotel, Singapore. This event could be this year's top ten news story across the Taiwan Straits, and for the world as well

The meeting will write a new chapter of the Chinese nation's history for generations of Chinese to come.

Lianhe Zaobao of Singapore reports that after isolation lasting for 66 years, the top leaders held a historic meeting at the Shangri-La Hotel, Singapore. Xi and Ma walked towards the Banquet Hall at 3 p.m. local time.

Hundreds of journalists witnessed their handshake, which lasted for more than a minute that was profoundly significant. With mutual and constructive respect, both sides exchanged frank and in-depth views on issues to promote peaceful development and a national revival.


Xi-Ma meeting turns historic page in cross-Strait relations
Xi Jinping (R) shakes hands with Ma Ying-jeou during their meeting at the Shangri-La Hotel in Singapore, Nov. 7, 2015. (Xinhua/Li Xueren)

The historic meeting between Xi Jinping and Ma Ying-jeou in Singapore will have great significance on the development of cross-Strait relations, the mainland's Taiwan affairs chief said in a statement released late Sunday.

Xi and Ma met on Saturday afternoon in the first meeting between leaders of the two sides of the Taiwan Strait since 1949, turning a historic page in cross-Strait relations.

In a mutually respectful and constructive manner, the two sides candidly exchanged views on cross-Strait relations, focusing on peaceful development and national rejuvenation. Positive consensus has been reached, said Zhang Zhijun, head of the Taiwan Work Office of the Communist Party of China (CPC) Central Committee and the Taiwan Affairs Office of the State Council, in the statement.

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Xi, Ma shake hands in show of solidarity across Taiwan Strait
Chinese President Xi Jinping (right) shakes hands with Taiwan leader Ma Ying-jeou before their historic meeting at the Shangri-La hotel in Singapore on Saturday. — AFP

CHINA’S mainland and Taiwan must not let proponents of the island’s independence split them, China’s President Xi Jinping told Taiwan’s chief Ma Ying-jeou at the first meeting between leaders across the Taiwan Strait since China’s civil war ended in 1949.

Xi told Ma that “no matter how long divisions last, there is no power that can separate us.”

The talks at a luxury hotel in the neutral venue of Singapore lasted less than an hour. Xi and Ma smiled broadly and clasped hands for well over a minute. “Today will be remembered in history,” Xi said in his remarks before the meeting.

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Xi Jiping-Ma Ying Jeou Summit
Welcome to the South China Morning Post’s coverage of the historic meeting between President Xi Jinping and Taiwanese President Ma Ying-jeou, which began at 3pm with a drawn-out handshake

'We are brothers': Xi hails closer ties with Taiwan as closed-door talks with Ma wrap up at historic Singapore summit

Xi makes first move with outstretched hand in highly symbolic 80-second handshake that pundits will pore over later as postmortems of the event are conducted online and offline

The two leaders said they would address one another simply as “Mister” before their opening remarks, in order to sidestep the complicated issue of having two Chinese leaders with similar titles, but in the end they refrained from using any such titles in front of the media

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Leaders of China and Taiwan Talk of Peace Across the Strait
Students gathered in Singapore on Saturday as the presidents of China and Taiwan met. Credit Fazry Ismail/European Pressphoto Agency

President Xi Jinping of China met with President Ma Ying-jeou of Taiwan on Saturday in the first-ever encounter between leaders of the neighbors and longtime rivals, an act both sides described as a breakthrough gesture meant to promote peace and mutual prosperity.

Mr. Xi and Mr. Ma began their brief talks with a handshake that went on for more than a minute, with both men smiling broadly and turning side to side so the hundreds of reporters in the meeting room at the Shangri-La Hotel in Singapore could document the moment. The meeting is a high point in the two leaders’ efforts to bridge the divisions of civil war and decades of animosity.

When the two men sat down to start their talks, Mr. Xi spoke first and said their encounter was a historic step that opened a new chapter in relations between the two sides. He said that the people of China and Taiwan were compatriots, “one family with blood that is thicker than water.”

related:
Meeting With Taiwan Reflects Limits of China’s Checkbook
When Leaders of Taiwan and China Meet, Even Tiny Gestures Will Be Parsed
In Heat of August 1945, Mao and Chiang Met for the Last Time
China, Taiwan and a Meeting After 66 Years

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Deciphering the Big China-Taiwan Meeting

It was an unusually creative gesture for Xi Jinping to agree to an unprecedented meeting with Taiwan’s President Ma Ying-jeou, the first such meeting between mainland and Taiwan heads of government in sixty-six years. Some even suggested a parallel with Richard Nixon’s opening to China in 1972.

But when the dust settled in Singapore, it was a meeting that lasted fifty minutes, produced no agreements or obvious new directions in cross-Strait relations. Its main import was that it actually happened. The measure of its significance will only be evident after Taiwan’s presidential elections next January. Will the Xi-Ma encounter reinforce stability or be the harbinger of new cross-Strait tensions if, as expected, the Democratic Progressive Party’s (DPP) Tsai Ing-wen is Ma’s successor as president?

That concern was clearly what motivated Xi to set the extraordinary precedent of treating Taiwan, which Beijing considers merely a province, as an equal entity. Though they addressed each other only as “Mister,” that political fiction did not hide the reality of Xi’s flattery of Taiwan.

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Japan says ties with Taiwan unchanged after Ma-Xi meeting

Japanese government spokesman Yoshihide Suga said Monday that Taiwan is still an important partner and that relations between Taiwan and Japan remain unchanged after the historic Nov. 7 meeting between President Ma Ying-jeou (馬英九) and his Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping (習近平).

Suga made the remarks at a regular press briefing when asked to comment on the Ma-Xi meeting.

Suga said that the Japanese government's longstanding stance is hoping the two sides of the Taiwan Strait can peacefully resolve their problems through direct dialogue. Japan also hopes that future interaction between the two sides can be conducive to regional peace and stability, and will closely watch any changes in the situation following the meeting, Suga added.

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Ma says meeting with Xi signals mature Taiwan-U.S.-China relations

President Ma Ying-jeou (馬英九) said Tuesday that Taiwan and China both notified the United States of his Nov. 7 meeting with Chinese President Xi Jinping (習近平) in Singapore beforehand and that Washington expressed support for the meeting before and after the landmark summit.

This, according to Ma, indicates that relations among Taiwan, the U.S. and China are characterized by mutual trust and are mature. An improvement in relations between the two sides of the Taiwan Strait have created a win-win-win outcome, the president said.

He said that on the one hand, the Ma-Xi meeting took place under the spotlight of the world and is of great historic symbolism.

China and Taiwan leaders hail historic talks

The leaders of China and Taiwan have held historic talks in Singapore - their first in more than 60 years.

Chinese President Xi Jinping and Taiwan's President Ma Ying-jeou shook hands at the start of the talks, which were seen as largely symbolic.

China views Taiwan as a breakaway province which will one day be reunited with the mainland. But many Taiwanese see it as independent and are concerned at China's growing influence.

related:
The awkward questions that could crop up
What's behind the China-Taiwan divide?


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Everyone must agree Xi Jinping & Ma Ying-jeou’s 1-minute handshake was pretty warm, friendly

Both men were reported to be relaxed as they looked at each other momentarily when they met, before standing close to each other.

They continued shaking hands for a full minute as flashlights went off in quick succession to capture this historic moment.

Before the handshake, both men walked onto a carpeted area from different sides of the foyer, met in the middle and smiled broadly. After the handshake, they waved before entering a meeting room with other members of their delegations, where they made remarks to a selection of the media.


Ma-Xi meeting 'long overdue'

A visiting U.S. congressman yesterday praised the recently concluded historic meeting between President Ma Ying-jeou and mainland Chinese leader Xi Jinping by saying that such dialogue is "healthy" for the improvement of cross-strait relations.

During a press event with local media in Taipei, Representative Matt Salmon, chairman of the Subcommittee on Asia and the Pacific of the U.S. House Committee on Foreign Affairs, said the historic meeting was long "overdue" and important to improving Taiwan-China relations.

"I was very impressed (with the meeting)," Salmon said, adding that this is the first meeting between leaders of both sides of the Taiwan Strait in over 60 years.

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Xi-Ma meeting sets precedent for a meeting of equals

A STRONG, vigorous handshake that lasted more than a minute marked the historic first meeting between the leader of the People's Republic of China and the leader of Taiwan, which has been the home of the government of the Republic of China since its defeat by the Communists in the Chinese civil war.


Impact of 2015 Xi-Ma meeting
Taiwan's Beijing-friendly leader Ma Ying-jeou (AFP)

ANU PhD candidate Yu-Hua Chen believes that Xi Ma meeting intends to interfere Taiwan election.

Meanwhile, Spectator (China) editor Yuan Cai argues the meeting helps China eases diplomatic tensions with regional countries.

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Timeline of China-Taiwan relations leading to historic meet
Protesters rally against the meeting of Taiwan President Ma Ying-jeou and China counterpart Xi Jinping in Singapore outside of the Songshan Airport in Taipei, Taiwan, Saturday, Nov. 7, 2015. Taiwan's Ma and China's Xi are the first leaders from the two sides to meet since their territories split during the Chinese civil war in 1949. Ma is the successor to Chiang Kai-shek, whose Nationalists retreated to the island, while Xi now leads Mao Zedong's victorious Communists, who set up government in Beijing. (AP Photo)

China and Taiwan have been separately ruled since the Chinese civil war of the 1940s, but China claims sovereignty over the island and insists the two sides eventually unify.

They have in recent years set aside that dispute to build trust and sign economic cooperation deals, and their presidents met for the first time yesterday.

A timeline of relations as the two sides have moved gradually over the past 36 years from outright hostility to face-to-face meetings.

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What the Xi-Ma summit suggests for Taiwan and the region
Reports on the historic meeting between Chinese President Xi Jinping and Taiwanese President Ma Ying-jeou in Singapore last Saturday dominated Taiwanese newspapers' front pages. Some analysts have said that the summit's effect could be quicker integration between the two sides, including political integration. PHOTO: EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY

The governments on both sides of the Taiwan Strait may have denied it but the Xi-Ma summit was in part about the presidential and legislative elections in Taiwan early next year.

Neither Taiwanese President Ma Ying-jeou nor Chinese President Xi Jinping expect their history- making meeting in Singapore last Saturday to overturn the fortunes of Mr Ma's Kuomintang (KMT), which is expected to lose both the presidency and its majority in the legislature to the independence- leaning Democratic Progressive Party (DPP).

The gap between them in the presidential race is just too wide, with polls showing KMT chairman and presidential candidate Eric Chu trailing DPP chief and candidate Tsai Ing-wen by between 11 and 27 percentage points. As for the legislative elections, DPP stalwart Frank Hsieh expects that only in a few seats, where the candidates are neck-and-neck, might the KMT turn the tables on the DPP, too few for the ruling party to defeat the DPP overall.

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Meeting With Taiwan Reflects Limits of China’s Checkbook
A protester in Taipei, Taiwan, kicking a portrait of President Xi Jinping of China. Credit Associated Press

For the past eight years, the Chinese government has showered its former enemies in Taiwan with economic gifts: direct flights, commercial deals, even an undersea water pipeline. Trade is up more than 50 percent, and mainland tourists, once barred from traveling to the island, now arrive in droves, nearly four million last year alone.

But Beijing has discovered, again, that money cannot buy love.

In Taiwan last year, large protests broke out against an agreement to expand trade with the mainland, and the governing Kuomintang, or Nationalist Party, which favors closer ties with China, has plummeted in popularity and is widely expected to lose the presidency and possibly the legislature in January elections.

5 Taiwanese arrested by Singapore for protesting against Xi Jin Ping

Five Taiwanese were arrested by the Singapore police for protesting outside Shangri-La hotel yesterday (Nov 7). Under the Singapore law’s Public Order Act, foreigners are not allowed to organise or participate in a public assembly without a police permit.

Many Taiwanese have expressed their dissatisfaction against the meeting between China President Xi Jin Ping and Taiwan President Ma Ying Jeou, as they are against the one-China policy believing that Taiwan should be an independent country of its own. The conflict goes as far back as 66 years ago when KMT lost the civil war in China to the communists and fled to Taiwan under the protection of the United States.

The Singapore police issued the following statement: “Foreigners in Singapore are reminded to comply with our laws and heed the directions of the police and other officials. Those who break the law will be firmly dealt with.”


Clara Chou: The woman who stole the limelight at press conferences of historic Xi-Ma meeting
Independent journalist Clara Chou at the press conference after the historic Xi-Ma meeting in Singapore on Nov 7, 2015.ST PHOTO: KUA CHEE SIONG

At the press conferences held after the historic meeting between China President Xi Jinping and Taiwan President Ma Ying-jeou in Singapore on Nov 7, one woman became the centre of attention for a few brief - and tense - moments.

The shrill voice of the journalist from Taiwan rang out across the room as she tried to catch the attention of China's Taiwan Affairs Office director Zhang Zhijun and later Mr Ma.

During Mr Zhang's press conference, she asked loudly: "Does your 'one China principle' refer to 'one China with different interpretations'?"

South China Sea issue should be resolved peacefully, says China's Xi Jinping

China has always insisted that the dispute in the South China Sea be resolved peacefully through talks, said Chinese President Xi Jinping on Saturday (Nov 7).

Freedom of passage in the South China Sea has never been a problem and will never be a problem, he added at the Singapore Lecture.

But he reasserted China's territorial claims in the South China Sea: "The South China Sea islands have been Chinese territory since ancient times. It is our duty to uphold sovereignty."

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Update 22 Nov 2016: The Soong-Xi engagement at APEC summit in Lima

Taipei, Nov. 20 (CNA) The government welcomes interaction between representatives of Taiwan and China at the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) leaders' meeting, a Presidential Office official said Sunday.

Opposition People First Party Chairman James Soong (宋楚瑜), who represented President Tsai Ing-wen (蔡英文) at the 2016 APEC summit in the Peru capital of Lima the previous day, had a brief meeting with Chinese President Xi Jinping (習近平) there, during which Soong expressed hope for continued trade and economic exchanges between the two sides of the Taiwan Strait.

Commenting on the Soong-Xi meeting, Presidential Office spokesman Alex Huang (黃重諺) said it is very natural for representatives of the two sides of the Taiwan Strait to talk and exchange opinions with each other, and that the Presidential Office welcomes such interaction.


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Full Coverage:
What the historic Ma-Xi meeting could mean for cross-Strait
Taiwan's Ma Wants China's Xi to Ease Island's Isolation
The leaders of China and Taiwan to meet, amid widespread
The China-Taiwan Summit
Xi-Ma meeting sets precedent for a meeting of equals, Opinion
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Taipei's Conundrum: Ma-Xi meeting raises old issues across Taiwan
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