Tuesday, 24 June 2014

‘Wear White’ vs ‘Pink Dot’


2014 campaign reflects on Singapore’s shifting community landscape, with the introduction of Ambassadors and the unveiling of a new campaign video

The movement supporting the Freedom to Love returns for its sixth consecutive year with new Ambassadors, a community-focused campaign video, and a more interactive and reflective atmosphere at Speakers’ Corner in Hong Lim Park. This year, Pink Dot shines the spotlight on the community and their perspectives on what the Freedom to Love means to them. Spearheading this are the Ambassadors for Pink Dot 2014, thespians recognised and respected for their craft, as well as their contributions to society: Sebastian Tan, Janice Koh, and Brendon Fernandez. Probably best known as his alter ego, Broadway Beng, Sebastian Tan is an award-winning performer whose body of work is as artistically eclectic as the person himself, appearing in productions such as the UK tour of Miss Saigon, Forbidden City: Portrait of an Empress and Cinderel-Lah. His accolades include two Straits Times Life! Theatre Awards in 2009 and 2010, and a Star Award in 1997.

Current Nominated Member of Parliament, Janice Koh has been a fervent champion for the arts, creativity, and LGBT issues. To date, Janice has spoken on a range of topics in Parliament, including the importance of the arts and humanities in education, heritage conservation and censorship in the arts and media. A lauded stage and television actor, Janice has appeared in many homegrown television productions including Fighting Spiders and The Pupil, with honours including a Life! Theatre Award in 2003, and an Asian Television Award in 2010. Singaporeans may recognise Brendon Fernandez as the host for documentaries and current affairs programmes for Channel NewsAsia; on stage, his most recent plays include Company, The Optic Trilogy, and critically-acclaimed The Importance of Being Earnest. Brendon hopes that Singapore will be a place that every member of his family – regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity – can call home.

Joining the Ambassadors in this year’s Campaign Video are more than 40 Singaporeans from all walks of life, weighing in on the question: What Does The Freedom To Love Mean To You? Helmed by up-and-coming filmmaker Leon Cheo and titled, For Family, For Friends, For Love, the video features LGBT and straight Singaporeans coming together to share their sentiments about Pink Dot and their wish for a more open-minded and inclusive Singapore. In a back-tobasics concept, the reel pays tribute to the heartwarming series of vignettes showcased in earlier editions of Pink Dot, while highlighting the changes that have taken place in the years since.


On 28th June, We Wear Pink.
“When we come together, it’s powerful.”

Compared to previous years, the sense you get when you watch the Pink Dot 2014 campaign video is more celebratory than sombre. We do have much to be proud of - the LGBT community in Singapore has come a long way.

The optimism in the video isn’t long-lived. Any LGBT campaign video will show you how dangerous stigmatization and intolerance can be. We’ve outdone ourselves by leaps and bounds, but less can be said about the micro-aggressions that members of the LGBT community still continue to face everyday.

Whether it is sniggering at the transsexual dining at the table across from you, avoiding the seat next to the sissy on the bus, or curiously gawking at that gay couple holding hands in the supermarket, homo- and transsexual people have to deal with so much more than just their own sexuality.


Pink Dot rally organisers open to ‘constructive discussion’
Pink Dot 2013. TODAY file photo

The organisers behind the annual Pink Dot gathering have responded to the wave of controversy that has erupted in the wake of an online campaign launched by an Islamic religious teacher against the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) movement.

In a statement, a spokesperson for the Pink Dot organising committee said they were saddened that “certain quarters have reacted negatively to our efforts at creating a more loving and embracing society”.

“We call on all parties to exercise restraint and engage each other in dialogue...Pink Dot also welcomes the opportunity to meet with any and all parties who wish to engage with us in thoughtful and constructive discussion,” the spokesperson said.


Archbishop's Message: Re-statement of the church's position on the family

My dear brothers and sisters in Christ, The LGBT movement is gaining momentum. Some of you are confused and are asking what the Church’s position is with regard to the family.

The Catholic Church has always maintained, and continues to maintain, that the family, comprising a father, mother and children, remains the basic building block of society.

She recognizes that there are individuals who are attracted to people of the same sex. Regardless of their sexual orientation, the Church has always looked on each individual as being a child of God, made in His image and likeness and is therefore worthy of love and respect.

read more


Church network joins Muslim group in stand against Pink Dot
The Faith Community Baptist Church (FCBC) building at 3 Marine Parade Central. Senior pastor of the church, Mr Lawrence Khong has said that FCBC and the LoveSingapore network of churches will join an informal Muslim group in wearing white next Saturday to protest against homosexuality and defend family values. -- ST FILE PHOTO

A network of churches in Singapore will join an informal Muslim group in wearing white next Saturday to protest against homosexuality and defend traditional family values.

Members of the Faith Community Baptist Church (FCBC) and the LoveSingapore network of churches are supporting an online campaign led by Ustaz Noor Deros.

Members of both groups intend to wear white next Saturday, the date of the Pink Dot picnic – an annual event promoting “the freedom to love” regardless of sexual orientation and organised by the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community.



Christians join Muslims in protest against Pink Dot

In what could be a rare show of solidarity between two faiths, members of the Faith Community Baptist Church (FCBC) and the LoveSingapore network of churches have announced that they will be joining the Wear White campaign, initiated by members of the Muslim community, to protest against the Pink Dot event to be held at Hong Lim Park next Saturday, 28 June.

The Wear White campaign was initiated by Ustaz Noor Deros, 28, a religious leader, in a bid to ask Muslims to “return to their natural disposition”. The campaign calls for Muslims to wear white when attending the first prayer on 28 June. The Muslim month of Ramadan starts on Sunday, 29 June.

The campaign organisers have earlier spoken out strongly against Pink Dot, saying the Pink Dot organisers have deliberately chosen the date as a mark of disrespect to Islam.

read more


Catholic Church discourages LGBT relationships but decrys discrimination

The Catholic Church has issued a statement on the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transexual (LGBT) movement, joining the ranks of other religious groups that have spoken up on the issue.

In an open letter to Catholics posted on the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Singapore's website on Saturday, Archbishop William Goh maintained that the family unit comprises a father, mother and children; and that LGBT sexual relationships are "not in accordance with the plan of God".

But, he also said that the Church recognises that there are individuals who are attracted to people of the same sex.

read more

Catholic Church takes harder stance on LGBT “lifestyle”
Annual Pink Dot Event

In what is seen as a harder stance on the issue of homosexuality, the Catholic Church in Singapore has pronounced the Lesbian, Gay, Bi-sexual, and Transgender (LGBT) “lifestyle” as being “detrimental to society”.

The Church said such a lifestyle “is not helpful to integral human development and contrary to Christian values.”

These views were set out by the head of the Catholic Church here in Singapore, Archbishop William Goh, in a pastoral letter to Catholics on 21 June. (See here for full letter.)

read more

Church must work with like-minded groups to oppose Pink Dot: Pastor
Pink Dot 2013. TODAY file photo

With only a few days before the sixth annual Pink Dot gathering is held at the Speakers’ Corner on Saturday, Faith Community Baptist Church (FCBC) senior pastor Lawrence Khong said yesterday: “It is time for the church to work with like-minded groups (such as Muslims) to register our opposition (to the event) before it is too late.”

Writing in a lengthy Facebook post, Mr Khong said people need to let the Government know that by allowing the event, held in support of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community, to continue without restraint, it is “bordering on endorsing and emboldening the LGBT claim to gay rights”. “We must continue writing private letters to our ministers. But we have come to the point where the Pink Dot event is getting so unashamedly public and loud with its agenda that we can no longer just rely on private communication,” he added.

Among other things, Mr Khong, who has regularly spoken out against homosexuality, also said multinational corporations “have no business in supporting Pink Dot”. “They cannot and should not meddle (in) our national values,” he said.


Singapore's 'Pink Dot' Gay Rights Rally May Be Protested By Religious Demonstrators In White
In this Saturday June 29, 2013 photo released by Pink Dot SG rally organizers, two men kiss at the annual Pink Dot SG rally in support of gay rights in Singapore's Hong Lim Park. Singapore's first openly gay politician, Vincent Wijeysingha, a member of the opposition Singapore Democratic Party says he believes Singapore's government will someday be forced to abolish a law that criminalizes consensual sex between men. (AP Photo/Pink Dot SG) | ASSOCIATED PRESS

Some Christians have joined Muslims in Singapore urging followers to wear white this weekend in protest at the sixth annual "Pink Dot" gay rights rally, which attracted a record 21,000 people last year.

Singapore is seeing growing anger over issues ranging from immigration and rising living costs to gay rights - all in a country where dissent is actively discouraged and political gatherings require a permit regardless of how many people are involved.

Last year's Pink Dot rally was held just months after the High Court rejected a petition to repeal a law which criminalizes sex between men.

read more

Singapore: Christians and Muslims join forces to protest against gay rights
The WearWhite campaign has been joined by Christians

Christians and Muslims have joined up in Singapore in an effort to protest against a gay rights rally which last year attracted over 20,000 people.

Despite political gatherings needing a permit, regardless of how many people are to attend, the Pink Dot rally in 2013 attracted more than 21,000 people just months before the High Court rejected a challenge to the country’s sodomy law

Now Ustaz Noor Deros, a Muslim teacher, has launched the WearWhite campaign, which urged muslims to reject the Pink Dot event, and to wear white to pray on the night of the event.

read more

Anti-gay churches endorse Muslim group's call to protest gay rally in Singapore

Singapore's highest Islamic authority cautions Muslims against adopting a 'confrontational approach' and that mosques 'must not be seen as a movement to oppose' LGBTIs

With one week to go before Pink Dot, the largest pro-LGBTI rally in Singapore, an Islamic religious teacher earlier this month launched an online campaign to protest against homosexuality and the Pink Dot event.

Led by Ustaz Noor Deros, a religious teacher, the group said in a press statement on its web site that the WearWhite (#wearwhite) movement is a response to their 'observations of the growing normalization of LGBT in Singapore.' Their video on YouTube, which features 10 unnamed individuals and was released earlier this week, has since been made private


Pastor accuses gov’t of “more than tolerating gay agenda”

In an attack on the annual “right to love” celebration – known as Pink Dot – organised by the gay community in Singapore, the senior pastor at the Faith Community Baptist Church (FCBC) said on his Facebook page on Monday that the government, in allowing the annual event, is “more than tolerating the gay agenda”.


Senior pastor Lawrence Khong, who has been at the forefront of the anti-gay movement in Singapore, said the government is “bordering on endorsing and emboldening the LGBT claim to gay rights.”

“We must continue writing private letters to our Ministers,” he said in his posting which is addressed to “fellow pastors”.

read more

PinkDot or Wearwhite? A choice between rhetoric or truth

Rhetoric is powerful, but it cannot hide facts.

At first glance, the statement issued by “members of civil society”, which is signed by 217 individuals and 9 organisations like Maruah, AWARE and the Free Community Church, appears to stand for a side advocating for the love and care of LGBT individuals.

In their statement, they quoted values like democracy, justice and equality; called for a dialogue to foster understanding and tolerance; used words like compassion and knowledge and contrasted it against ignorance, hatred, prejudice and discrimination.



Wear white to protest Singapore pink gay rally, religious groups say

Lawrence Khong, head of the Faith Community Baptist Church, and the LoveSingapore network of churches has joined Ustaz Noor Deros, a Muslin teacher in encouraging people to support the WearWhite movement.

Some Christians have joined Muslims in Singapore urging followers to wear white this weekend in protest at the sixth annual "Pink Dot" gay rights rally, which attracted a record 21,000 people last year.

Singapore is seeing growing anger over issues ranging from immigration and rising living costs to gay rights – all in a country where dissent is actively discouraged and political gatherings require a permit regardless of how many people are involved.


Vincent Wijeysingha hits out at Singapore archbishop’s open letter about LGBT individuals
Yahoo Newsroom - Vincent Wijeysingha announced his resignation from the Singapore Democratic Party on Wednesday afternoon. (Yahoo! file photo)

Social work lecturer Vincent Wijeysingha has condemned an open letter written by the archbishop of the Catholic church in Singapore William Goh, “Re-statement of the church’s position on the family”.

In a Facebook note published on Monday, the 44-year-old, whopublicly came out as a gay man last year, also revealed that he had come into "unfortunate contact with a priest who would engage me in play wrestling and attempt to touch my crotch in the process”. This happened, he said, when he was 15.

Wijeysingha added, "He once brought me to his bedroom and took a stack of pornographic magazines from his wardrobe to show me.”


Wear white to protest Singapore pink gay rally, religious groups say

Ustaz Noor Deros, a Muslim teacher, launched the WearWhite movement last week, urging Muslims not to take part in the Pink Dot event on Saturday, and to wear white garments to prayers on that night as they usher in the holy month of Ramadan. Its Facebook page has attracted more than 3,000 "Likes".

"The movement's genesis was from our observations of the growing normalization of LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender) in Singapore," the WearWhite website says.

That movement has been joined by Lawrence Khong, head of the Faith Community Baptist Church, and the LoveSingapore network of churches. He encouraged members of his church to wear white at this weekend's services.

read more

“When we come together, it’s powerful.”

Compared to previous years, the sense you get when you watch the Pink Dot 2014 campaign video is more celebratory than sombre. We do have much to be proud of - the LGBT community in Singapore has come a long way.

The optimism in the video isn’t long-lived. Any LGBT campaign video will show you how dangerous stigmatization and intolerance can be. We’ve outdone ourselves by leaps and bounds, but less can be said about the micro-aggressions that members of the LGBT community still continue to face everyday.

Whether it is sniggering at the transsexual dining at the table across from you, avoiding the seat next to the sissy on the bus, or curiously gawking at that gay couple holding hands in the supermarket, homo- and transsexual people have to deal with so much more than just their own sexuality.

read more

PINKDOT AIMS TO CHANGE SG CONSERVATIVE LAWS & POLICIES, NOT PROMOTE INCLUSIVITY
Rhetoric is powerful, but it cannot hide facts

At first glance, the statement issued by “members of civil society”, which is signed by 217 individuals and 9 organisations like Maruah, AWARE and the Free Community Church, appears to stand for a side advocating for the love and care of LGBT individuals.

In their statement, they quoted values like democracy, justice and equality; called for a dialogue to foster understanding and tolerance; used words like compassion and knowledge and contrasted it against ignorance, hatred, prejudice and discrimination.

They make a Samaritan out of everyone who attends PinkDot and vilifies those who have campaigned to wear white.

read more

Is Pink Dot Event Sowing Discord in Singapore?

Both religions groups from Islam and Christianity have started to publicly criticize the Pink Dot Event that support the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT). Although I have friends who openly declared they are lesbians, I don't agree that they have to actively promote the event. What is the purpose? Are they trying to sow discord in our multi-racial and religious society? I'm uncomfortable with LGBT zealous attempt to promote the Pink Dot event. I'm worried as the event seem to be gaining momentum and I'm worried our youth might think it is the norm to be homosexual or bisexual which is not. In fact, I don't understand why someone want to be bisexual. Isn't it promiscuous?

If the pink dot event is organized so as to provoke the majority of Singaporeans who are mostly tolerant, then I hope the authority will step in. Somehow I think our government ask for it as the big sponsors are mostly foreign companies that employ more foreigners than Singaporeans. 
What's next after Pink dot event? Are they going to ask for same-sex marriage? I don't really care what they do in the bedroom. But I do care that our society is not heavily influenced by western irresponsible democracy. Though USA enjoys freedom, their citizens are dying from rampant gun shootings and legalization of marijuana.

I think insulting LGBT is wrong. I also don't think its right to promote something that is not right and natural.


Alternative Sexualities: A pinch of tolerance, and less bigotry please

I read on The Online Citizen that FCBC (Faith Community Baptist Church) and the LoveSingapore network of churches are joining Muslims in protest of the pro-LGBT Pink Dot event, through the Wear White campaign spearheaded by Muslim religious leader Ustaz Noor Deros. Lawrence Khong was quoted as posting on his Facebook page the following paragraph:

“I’m so happy that Singapore’s Muslim community is making a vocal and visual stand for morality and Family. I fully support the ‘wear white’ campaign. FCBC, together with the LoveSingapore network of churches, will follow suit on the weekend of 28 and 29 June, island-wide. I look forward to celebrating the Family with the Muslim community and I am pleased to partner with them in championing virtue and purity for the good of our nation!”

I won't mince my words. I find this offensive in 2 primary ways. I'd expected more from a religious leader - especially a prominent one such as Lawrence Khong.


Between pink and white

How do you champion or promote a cause without being divisive? Anyway that was Muslim Affairs Minister Yacob Ibrahim’s advice to those on both sides of the LGBT divide. Although it can also apply to any kind of divide…

So if you are a nature-lover, how do you champion a cause to preserve a green lung without alienating those who think trees should make way for public housing? Or if you are a pet lover, how do you convince those who don’t think dogs belong on trains? Or, more to the point, how to hold an LGBT celebration in public without bystanders looking askance? Hold it indoors?

Causes are by themselves divisive, which is why they are so-called. You can’t champion a cause by keeping quiet. And if you don’t keep quiet, how do you make your case in such a way so as not to attract the epithet that you are being “divisive’’? Or to have someone use that seemingly derogatory phrase that you are “lobbying’’? Ooooh. Shades of Western liberal democracy with its lobby groups putting the Government machinery in gridlock status! We don’t want that!


The Red, the White and The Pink


The religious campaign of non-acceptance has finally come to a head at Wear White.

Islamic religious scholar Ustaz Noor Deros of Masjid En-Naeem launched a Wear White movement earlier in June in protest of gay pride event Pink Dot. The movement’s organisers urged Muslims to wear white for evening prayers on the eve of Ramadan (which falls on 28 June) in protest of Pink Dot.

The announcement of Wear White has led to MUIS (the Islamic Religious Council of Singapore), PERGAS (Singapore Islamic Scholars Religious Teachers Association) as well as two G ministers to respond.


Wear white campaign a protest against homosexuality

The objective of Wearwhite is to help Muslims return to their ‘natural disposition‘. From a biological perspective, the natural disposition of any man or woman, Muslim, Christian, Buddhist or Hindu, is not to preserve ‘traditional values’, but that of a savage ape, one all too capable of betrayal, deceit, adultery, rape, cruelty, greed and murder and reluctantly domesticated by the products of his own invention: society, religion, ethics, the rule of law.

At least another Muslim academic was honest enough to call a spade a spade, that the LGBT movement is a CANCER that needs to be excised without sugar coating it with images of babies. The wear white contingent is on a mission to vanquish, and Minister Tan Chuan Jin, despite his lack of patience for the Blood Stained Singaporeracists, xenophobes and bigots, is predictably silent when it comes to people forming factions under the banner of heaven rallying against another group of human beings, some of whom even believe in the same God as the ‘fitrah’ fanclub. It’s fitting that the Wear White logo resembles a teardrop, because all this is, well, plain sad. Brother against brother with another brother for a lover.

White is also the theme at Chinese funerals, the colour of mourning. It is the pretentious dress you put on when you’re heading out for Diner en Blanc. For the Wear White brigade, it’s a holy pledge of incorruptibility and all things ‘good’ and ‘natural’. Not too far off from why white is the colour of choice for these jokers below too.

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Red Dot, Wear White don’t find it ironic they are standing up together against Pink Dot
Christians and Muslims reacting together against annual Pink Dot event

Matters have officially come to a head in Singapore as members of the Faith Community Baptist Church (FCBC) and the LoveSingapore network of churches have announced they will join the Wear White campaign initiated by some Muslims.

The aim of these two religious groups is to make a stand against the upcoming Pink Dot event to be held at Hong Lim Park on June 28, 2014.

Ustaz Noor Deros, 28, a religious leader is responsible for initiating the Wear White campaign. He called for Muslims to wear white when attending the first prayer on June 28, in a bid to ask them to “return to their natural disposition”. The Muslim month of Ramadan happens to fall on June 29 this year.


Ex-ST reporter can write more freely about the S’pore govt now that she’s at BBC

Two months ago, Tessa Wong — a reporter who covered the politics beat for The Straits Times the last few years — up sticks and joined the BBC. Changing employers has its perks, and in this case, for the rest of us readers too.

Last year, while still at ST, Wong wrote an article about gay-rights event Pink Dot and how it was becoming more mainstream.

The piece focused on how a supposedly fringe event at Hong Lim Park that started in 2009 was playing its cards right, as it continues gaining traction slowly and steadily.


Singapore dilemma: When diversity policy meets local law
The issue of gay rights is increasingly fraught in Singapore, which aspires to be an open business hub

In May, a dozen university students showed up for dinner at Goldman Sachs' office in Singapore's business district.

But it was no run-of-the-mill event. Hosted by the company's Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) employee network, and billed as a "LGBT recruiting and networking dinner", it triggered controversy in this largely conservative nation-state.

Local newspaper MyPaper ran a piece ahead of the dinner entitled: "Wanted by Goldman Sachs: LGBT employees". News of the event caused enough handwringing that Minister for Social and Family Development Chan Chun Sing publicly expressed concern.

related:


Men And Women In White

Silly me, to think that men (and women) wear white so that they can be associated with the ruling party. Membership has its privileges, such as first shot at the choice units at Pinnacle@Duxton when it was launched. Too bad it is now degraded to a pissing spot for ladies with incontinence.

Islamic religious teacher Ustaz Noor Deros, 28, has launched the Wear White Facebook page and website to ask Muslims to wear white next Saturday in support of the "return to fitrah" - the Arabic word for "natural" - and support "what is good and pure". Which is all healthy and conducive for multi-racial multi-cultural living and loving. But the message of peace is short-lived:

"There are groups that are trying to destroy the sanctity of the family. The natural state of human relationships is now under sustained attack by lgbt activists. For the lgbt movement, the natural family is no longer sacred.
To underline their disdain for Islam and the family, lgbt activists are organising an event on the very evening of 1st Ramadan. They expect this event to be the biggest ever in their history."

read more

Religious teacher launches 'wear white' online campaign
Ustaz Noor Deros (above) is behind the Wear White Facebook page and website. The campaign video earlier featured theatre actor Najib Soiman (right) but he has now asked to be taken out of it. -- PHOTOS: WEAR WHITE'S FACEBOOK PAGE, HARYANI OTHMAN

AN ISLAMIC religious teacher has launched an online campaign asking Muslims to wear white next Saturday evening to protest against homosexuality and defend traditional family values.

Ustaz Noor Deros, 28, is behind the Wear White Facebook page and website and is asking Muslims to "return to fitrah" - the Arabic word for "natural" - and support "what is good and pure".

The Muslim month of Ramadan starts on Sunday next week and the first evening prayer to mark the fasting month will be held on Saturday evening.


Wear white to protest Singapore pink gay rally, religious groups say

That movement has been joined by Lawrence Khong, head of the Faith Community Baptist Church, and the LoveSingapore network of churches. He encouraged members of his church to wear white at this weekend's services.

Khong said that WearWhite movement was meant to defend the official position of the government.

"We cannot and will not endorse homosexuality. We will continue to resist any public promotion of homosexuality as an alternative lifestyle," Khong said in a Facebook posting.

read more

A group of Muslims have organised a ‘Wear White’ movement to protest against S’pore’s LGBT movement

Muhammad Najib Soiman, an artist and part-time lecturer featured in Wear White’s promotional video, has publicly requested the organisers to take out his part in the video. The 37 year old told Mothership.sg that there was a miscommunication between the organisers and him. The organisers previously said that the objective of the video was to ‘embrace Ramadan’.

A group of Muslims have organised a ‘Wear White’ movement to protest against Pink Dot SG, an annual non-profit movement that supports the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) community in Singapore.

The organisers, led by Noor Deros, have urged other Muslims to wear white on 28 June 2014, during the first tarawih – or the first night prayer during Ramadan – and share photographs of people they pray with on social media. A Muslim website stated that Ustaz Noor Deros is a graduate from the faculty of Theology of Al-Azhar University and was employed by En-Naeem mosque in Tampines.

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#wearWHITE

The WearWhite movement is a social media initiative inviting Muslims to return to our natural disposition (fitrah) and the Sunnah (way) of Prophet Muhammad (Peace Be Upon Him).

The movement's genesis was from our observations of the growing normalization of LGBT in Singapore. However, we recognize the conduct and it's support among Muslims is due to the lack of understanding and connection with Islam and our fitrah. We thus came together initially with the expressed purpose of reminding Muslims not to participate in the LGBT event on 28th June.

The movement encourages a return to the values as guided by Islam. These values include prioritizing the family and marriage, responsibility and justice and fair dealings.

read more


Wear white to protest Singapore pink gay rally, religious groups say


The majority of Singaporeans appear to be against same-sex marriage, even as Pink Dot has seen growing support since it began in 2009 and attracted corporate sponsors including BP , Goldman Sachs and Google.

A study by the Institute of Policy Studies released at the start of this year found that 78.2 percent of Singaporeans felt sexual relations between two adults of the same sex was always or almost always wrong, and 72.9 percent of them were against gay marriage. Singapore government ministers have called for restraint amid growing support for the WearWhite movement, though human rights activists say there should be clearer condemnation of discrimination.

"The state needs to come in and take on a clearer role from a legal perspective," said Braema Mathi, president of MARUAH, a human rights group.

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LOCAL MUSLIM GROUP ORGANIZE A 'WEAR WHITE' EVENT TO COUNTER PINK DOT 2014
PRESS RELEASE FROM THE "WEAR WHITE" EVENT ORGANIZERS

Assalamualaikum wr wb, Bismillah, walhamdulillah, the blessed month of Ramadan is just around the corner, if Allah wills, it will descend on the night of 28th of June around 7pm+. We ask Allah that He allow us to be among those who will be blessed with His mercy in that month of rahmah and maghfirah. Amin.

Ramadan is a month of introspection. It is a month of guidance. It connects us with our Rabb.

In living our lives according to Allah's commands and guidance, we reconnect with our family and community. Let the coming of Ramadan remind us of the importance of the family.Let it remind us to return to the natural state of life. Let it remind us to Return to fitrah.



Alfian Sa'at facebook

There's a 'wear white' campaign which is supposed to be a protest against Pink Dot on 28 June. It is a call for Muslims to wear white for the evening prayers on the first day of Ramadan. (If some clueless people turn up wearing pink then how? But that's the downside of having a diffuse campaign which hitches a ride on something people do in Ramadan anyway--not everyone will get the memo). There's nothing wrong with expressing one's beliefs and opinions in this way, but I'm concerned with the way these are articulated on their website:

1) "There are groups that are trying to destroy the sanctity of the family. The natural state of human relationships is now under sustained attack by lgbt activists. For the lgbt movement, the natural family is no longer sacred."

This statement doesn't actually define what is a 'natural family'. One assumes then that it is one consisting of a man and a woman and preferably an offspring. But surely the definition of 'family' isn't so clear cut--there are single-parent families, as well as couples who don't have children. Some people don't think that a 'natural family' should consist of polygamous marriages, nor of marriages between those who are below 21 years old. A glaring omission however is the number one destroyer of families: namely, divorce. The divorce rates among Muslims is the highest among all the communities in Singapore, and while the number one cause for divorce in non-Muslim marriages is 'unreasonable behaviour', for Muslim marriages it is 'infidelity or extra-marital affairs' (Singstat 2012). If one needs to address the threats to the 'sanctity of the family', then one should cite the real ones. That gay couple who got attached isn't threatening your marriage; you sleeping around will.


MUIS urges mosques not to take confrontational stand on LGBT lifestyles

The Republic’s highest Islamic authority has called on mosques “not to adopt a confrontational approach or vilify those who are involved in LGBT lifestyles or in events such as Pink Dot”, referring to the annual event that will be held next Saturday at the Speakers’ Corner in support of the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community.

In an internal advisory issued to the mosques, the Islamic Religious Council of Singapore (MUIS) said it was against the promotion of the LBGT lifestyle, but that “support and help” must be given to those who have been leading the lifestyle or have inclinations towards it.

It said: “We do not agree (or) approve (of) the pervasiveness of the LGBT lifestyle and we cannot agree to the efforts in promoting such a lifestyle. Nevertheless, we have to plan for something which will not only strengthen the resilience of our community to the LGBT lifestyle, but also help those who have been leading this lifestyle abstain from it and, at the same time, help those who have inclinations towards this lifestyle overcome those inclinations by providing support to them.”

related:


MUIS tells Singapore mosques to adopt ‘non-confrontational’ approach towards LGBT community: report
The Islamic Authority of Singapore (MUIS) has distributed internal advisories to mosques in Singapore, reminding them to adopt a “non-confrontational approach” towards people in the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community, TODAY online reported on Saturday

The Islamic Authority of Singapore (MUIS) has distributed internal advisories to mosques in Singapore, reminding them to adopt a “non-confrontational approach” towards people in the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) community, TODAY online reported on Saturday.

Reasons for this include preventing those people from distancing themselves from the religion, getting into unnecessary arguments with them and giving them bad publicity.

While MUIS maintains that they do not support the promotion of LGBT lifestyles, “support and help” must be given to those who have been or are inclined to lead such lifestyles, the report said.


Muslims should not attend LGBT-related events: Islamic group

On the same day that MUIS issued an internal advisory to mosques on the LGBT issue, a group of Islamic scholars and clerics called on Muslims to refrain from attending events that support the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender lifestyle or movement.

“Muslims should not attend any event which promotes and supports transgression ... Attendance to such events is a form of tacit approval and support to the message of the event, such as permitting and normalising same-sex relations”, the Singapore Islamic Scholars & Religious Teachers Association (PERGAS) said yesterday on its Facebook page.

It said Islam “places great emphasis on establishing the family unit through valid marriage between a man and a woman”. Citing religious verses, PERGAS said Muslims supporting the LGBT movement is akin to “supporting other sinful acts, such as affirming that extra-marital relations are lawful”


Don’t be confrontational on LGBT lifestyles, Singapore mosques told
An-Nahdhah Mosque in Singapore

On the non-confrontational approach, MUIS said: “This is first and foremost to avoid them distancing themselves from the religion and the mosque. Secondly, this is to avoid being involved in unnecessary arguments with them, which will impede our long-term efforts (on the issue). At the same time, we also do not want them to get unwanted publicity.”

The advisory also asked the mosques “not to be seen as being involved in the crossfire” between the Pink Dot and the Wear White campaign, which was started online by Mr Noor Deros, a 28-year-old Islamic religious teacher.

Mr Noor is calling on Muslims to wear white next Saturday to protest against homosexuality and defend traditional family values. Ramadan begins next Sunday and the first evening prayer to mark the fasting month will be held on the previous day.


WearWhite FB

The WearWhite movement is a social media initiative inviting Muslims to return to our natural disposition (fitrah) and the Sunnah (way) of Prophet Muhammad (Peace Be Upon Him).

The movement's genesis was from our observations of the growing normalization of LGBT in Singapore. However, we recognize the conduct and it's support among Muslims is due to the lack of understanding and connection with Islam and our fitrah. We thus came together initially with the expressed purpose of reminding Muslims not to participate in the LGBT event on 28th June.

The movement encourages a return to the values as guided by Islam. These values include prioritizing the family and marriage, responsibility and justice and fair dealings.


‘Wear White’ vs ‘Pink Dot’

The advisories came after a “Wear White” campaign was launched on Facebook on 6 June to “remind Muslims not to participate” in the Pink Dot event, which rallies support for the LGBT community. Pink Dot is happening on 28 June at Hong Lim Park, which is also the eve of the first day of Ramadan - the Muslim holy fasting month.

The “Wear White” campaign, which was reportedly launched by an Islamic religious teacher, has also called on its supporters to wear clothes in white during an evening prayer that will be held on the same day.

The “Wear White” campaign sparked strong reactions from members of the community, including Singapore playwright Alfian Sa’at, who shared concerns on Facebook over the way the campaign organisers had expressed their views, using words such as “incendiary”, among others, to describe them.


A Rosy Hue (settles all around)

If I may suggest an alternative campaign for the rest of us who neither want to wear All-Pink or All-White: Wear a White T-Shirt with a Pink Dot on it.

Your message would be:
I may be conservative, traditional, or "normal", but I accept that there are people who are different. But "Different" doesn't mean "wrong"; "Different" doesn't mean "outsider", "Different" doesn't mean "abnormal" or "sick" or "deviant". "Different" just means "different". We are all different in different ways. I wear white with a pink dot because there are people who are different from me amongst us, and I accept them.

Red Dot family day planned for Padang cancelled
"The Red Dot event title and red colour theme were inspired by Singapore's national colour and the SG50 tagline - Celebrating The Little Red Dot,"

Touch had engaged religious and community groups such as Love Singapore, a network of about 100 churches, the Islamic Religious Council of Singapore and Taoist Federation Singapore to publicise the event to their members.

But the alternative venues, which MSF did not name, were not as accessible and did not have as many crowd-friendly amenities as the Padang, which is surrounded by shopping malls.

Though Touch denies any comparison with the Pink Dot event, observers told The Straits Times these would have been unavoidable had both been held on the same day.

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Red Dot family day planned for Padang cancelled

Plans by Touch Family Services to hold a gathering to celebrate the concept of family on the same day as a picnic for gay rights have fallen through.

Supported by several religious groups, the event was originally named Red Dot Family Moment and was slated to be held at the Padang on June 28, the same day as the Pink Dot picnic in Hong Lim Park. The voluntary welfare organisation had called on members of various faiths to turn up at the venue dressed in red in a show of support for the family.

However, the Urban Redevelopment Authority rejected its application last month to hold it at the Padang and Touch said yesterday that it was cancelling the event.

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Wear White + Red = Pink Dot

– Yahoo: Facing LGBT opposition from religious right, should Pink Dot fight for more
– Think For Me, Spore: Letter from a friend (Catholic Church hypocrites)
– Homosexuality&science: PinkDot or Wearwhite? A choice between rhetoric or truth
– I on Sg: Hypocrisy “Human Rights” Group MARUAH on Religion in Public Discourse
– Bertha Harian: Between pink and white
– Singapore 2B: A Rosy Hue (settles all around)
– Wise Mental King: The Red, the White and The Pink
– Chemical Generation Singapore: 377A: The Conservatives March On
– I on Singapore: Polarisation in LGBT Debate: Why should we be surprised?
– Hello summer: Being Muslim & Gay
– Lukeyishandsome: Us VS Them
– 5 Stars & a Moon: Attitudes towards Same-Sex Relation in Sg – A Bizarre Trend
– Vincent Wijeysingha: Policing The Moral: What Role For The Catholic Church
– TOC: Catholic Church takes harder stance on LGBT “lifestyle”
– The Smart Local: Pink Dot 2014 – On 28th June, We Wear Pink
– Just Speaking My Mind: Is Pink Dot Event Sowing Discord in Singapore?
– Literally Kidding: Alternative Sexualities: A pinch of tolerance, and less bigotry pl
– Everything Oso Complain: Wear white campaign a protest against homosexuality
– Singapore Notes: Men And Women In White
– The New Era: No objectionable material in song about acceptance in friendship
– New Nation: NDP 2014 to remove all LGBT element frm performance celebration