Friday, 18 April 2014

Good Friday 2014

Good Friday in Singapore

Good Friday commemorates Jesus' death on the cross

Many Christians around the world observe Good Friday on the Friday before Easter Sunday.

It commemorates Jesus Christ’s Passion, crucifixion and death, which is told in the Christian bible. It is the day after Maundy Thursday.


Good Friday

Good Friday, the day on which Christians commemorate the death of Jesus Christ on the Cross, falls on a different date each year.

Good Friday is the second day of the Triduum, the three days before Easter, during which Christians commemorate Christ's Passion. Because it is dependent on the date of Easter, and Easter is a moveable feast, the date of Good Friday changes each year.

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Good Friday
A Stabat Mater depiction, 1868

Good Friday is a religious holiday, observed primarily by Christians, commemorating the crucifixion of Jesus Christ and his death at Calvary. The holiday is observed during Holy Week as part of the Paschal Triduum on the Friday preceding Easter Sunday, and may coincide with the Jewish observance of Passover. It is also known as Holy Friday, Great Friday, Black Friday. or Easter Friday. though the last term properly refers to the Friday in Easter week.

Based on the details of the canonical gospels, the Crucifixion of Jesus was most likely to have been on a Friday (the day before the Jewish Sabbath) (John 19:42). The estimated year of the Crucifixion is AD 33, by two different groups, and originally as AD 34 by Isaac Newton via the differences between the Biblical and Julian calendars and the crescent of the moon. A third method, using a completely different astronomical approach based on a lunar Crucifixion darkness and eclipse model (consistent with Apostle Peter's reference to a "moon of blood" in Acts 2:20), points to Friday, 3 April AD 33.

Good Friday is a widely-instituted legal holiday in many national governments around the world, including in most Western countries as well as in 12 U.S. states. Some governments have laws prohibiting certain acts that are seen as contrasting the solemn nature of the day.