Tuesday, 18 February 2014

World's Longest Sea Bridges & Undersea Tunnel

China unveils plans to build 77-mile, £22 billion tunnel that will be the longest in the world


These are the plans for China 77-mile tunnel that, at a cost of £22billion, will be the longest in the world

Chinese engineers have unveiled plans to build the world’s longest tunnel.

At 77 miles, the Dalian-Yantai tunnel on the country’s eastern coast will save travellers an eight-hour ferry ride or 900-mile road trip.

The £22billion project could start within a couple of years, with completion scheduled for 2026.

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China plans the world's longest undersea tunnel

China is planning another engineering marvel: a tunnel more than twice the length of the Channel Tunnel underneath Bohai Bay

The new tunnel will knock 800 miles off the current route between Dalian and Yantai At more than twice the length of the Channel Tunnel, China's latest mega project is not short of ambition.

A 76-mile-long tunnel will run between the northern city of Dalian with Yantai, on the east coast.

"Work could begin as early as 2015 or 2016," said Wang Mengshu, an expert at the Chinese academy of Engineering, to the China Daily.

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Dalian to Yantai underwater tunnel to be world's longest

It would drastically cut the current travel time between the two cities, separated by a 1,400-km drive or about 8 hours by ferry.

Three tunnels in total will be built at least 30 meters below the sea bed, two about 10 meters in diameter, and a third between them for maintenance and emergency vehicles, the China Daily added.

The tunnel runs across two earthquake fault lines, and in 1976 the industrial city of Tangshan in Hebei province – between Shandong and Liaoning – was levelled by an earthquake with a magnitude of at least 7.5, although figures vary.

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China plans world's longest underwater tunnel: China Daily

By length, it will surpass the combined length of the world's two longest underwater tunnels - Japan's Seikan Tunnel and the Channel Tunnel between Britain and France.

The 123-kilometer tunnel will house a rail line connecting the port cities of Dalian in Liaoning province and Yantai in Shandong province, according to the plan.

"Using the tunnel, it will take only 40 minutes to travel from Dalian to Yantai," Wang said. At the moment it is a 1,400-km drive or about eight hours by ferry.

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China plans work on 123km tunnel

The tunnel, spanning 123 km (76.4 miles), will be more than twice as long as the current record-holder linking Japan's Honshu and Hokkaido islands. It will be completed by 2026, it quoted an engineer working on the project as saying.

The tunnel will run from the port city of Dalian in northeastern Liaoning province to Yantai city in eastern Shandong, slashing travel time to 40 minutes. At present, the journey between the cities is a 1,400-km drive or an eight-hour ferry ride, the China Daily said.

The longest undersea tunnel, Japan's 54-km Seikan tunnel, started operating in 1988 after more than two decades of construction. The Channel tunnel between England and France is about 51 km long

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China Considers Longest Underwater Tunnel Under Bohai Sea

China may invest 220 billion yuan ($36 billion) to build the world’s longest tunnel beneath the Bohai Sea to connect the northeastern city of Dalian to Yantai in Shandong province, the state-run China Daily said today.

Proposals for the 123-kilometer (76 miles) tunnel, which is targeted for completion in 2026, may be submitted to the central government in April, the newspaper said, citing Wang Mengshu, an engineer working on the project. A feasibility study taking two to three years could begin as early as 2015, the report said.

The proposed tunnel will be the latest large-scale project undertaken by China if approved. The world’s second-largest economy has poured billions in past years to build infrastructure to spur growth, which may be more critical with gross domestic product forecast by economists to expand this year at the slowest pace since 1990.

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Plan drafted for $36b (SGD$ 45.6b) undersea tunnel in China

The Eurotunnel freight train emerges from the Channel tunnel near the Eurotunnel terminal of Coquelles near Calais, northern France

"In general, though, one can say tunnels are not unsafe in earthquake areas, all depending on the geology, tunnel depth and other local conditions," he said.

"However, excavation of a tunnel through active faults, where displacement can occur with a potential danger of flooding, would be of great concern and needs special attention," Loftsson said.

Liu Jie, director of the China Earthquake Networks Center, agreed that Northeast China is unstable, with earthquakes of less than magnitude-5 frequently occurring, especially after a massive magnitude-9 earthquake in Japan in 1999 caused large-scale movement of the lithosphere, or the Earth's rigid surface.

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China to build world’s longest underwater tunnel

China plans to build the world’s longest underwater tunnel beneath the Bohai Sea by 2026, connecting the port cities of Dalian in Liaoning province and Yantai in Shandong province.

The blueprint of the ambitious project is expected to be submitted to the State Council of the People’s Republic of China in April, the China Daily reported on Friday.

“Once approved, work could begin as early as 2015 or 2016,” Wang Mengshu, a tunnel and railway expert at the Chinese Academy of Engineering, who has worked on the plan since 2012.

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World's longest underwater rail tunnel planned by China

A blueprint of the tunnel between two northern port cities Dalian to Yantai, will be submitted to China's Cabinet, in April

The 123-km underwater tunnel will follow the coastline to the west of Yantai, before veering north across the Bohai Sea

The new rail tunnel project will shorten distance between Dalian to Yantai to less than an hour instead of the current eight hours.

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China to build longest underwater tunnel

China plans to build the world’s longest underwater tunnel, an expert involved in the project revealed yesterday, a $36 billion shortcut between two northern port cities in an earthquake-prone region.

The scheme will see cars loaded onto railway carriages before travelling at 220 kilometres per hour along the 123-kilometre tunnel connecting Dalian in Liaoning province and Yantai in Shandong province.

“The underwater tunnel is expected to be completed within the period of the 13th five-year plan (2016 to 2020),” said Wang Mengshu, a tunnel and railway expert at the Chinese Academy of Engineering. “The cost will be around 220 billion yuan and it will be the world’s longest underwater tunnel,” added Wang, who has worked on the plan since 2012. A blueprint for the mammoth project is expected to be submitted to the all-powerful State Council in April, a report in the China Daily said yesterday.

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China could start work on longest tunnel next year: paper

Chinese engineers will submit a blueprint to the government by April for the world’s longest undersea tunnel and, once approved, work could start as early as 2015 or 2016, the China Daily newspaper reported on Friday.

The tunnel, spanning 123 km (76.4 miles), will be more than twice as long as the current record-holder linking Japan’s Honshu and Hokkaido islands. It will be completed by 2026, it quoted an engineer working on the project as saying.

The tunnel will run from the port city of Dalian in northeastern Liaoning province to Yantai city in eastern Shandong, slashing travel time to 40 minutes. At present, the journey between the cities is a 1,400-km drive or an eight-hour ferry ride, the China Daily said

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China opens world's longest sea bridge

China has opened the world’s longest sea bridge, a 26.4 mile-long structure that could easily span the English Channel.

Stretching across the wide blue waters of Jiaozhou bay, the vast Y-shaped bridge connects the booming Northern port city of Qingdao with an airport built on a nearby island and the industrial suburb of Huangdao.

The first motorists to roll onto the bridge’s six-lane, 110ft-wide, highway halved their journey time to the other side of the bay to just 30 minutes.

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The longest, tallest and oldest bridges in the world


China has opened the world’s longest sea bridge, a 26.4 mile-long structure that could easily span the English Channel. Stretching across the wide blue waters of Jiaozhou bay, the vast Y-shaped bridge connects the booming Northern port city of Qingdao with an airport built on a nearby island and the industrial suburb of Huangdao
The first motorists to roll onto the bridge’s six-lane, 110ft-wide, highway halved their journey time to the other side of the bay to just 30 minutes. While the bridge will eventually charge cars 50 yuan (£4.80) for the crossing, for a month the drive will be free
Built in just four years at a cost reported by the Chinese state media as £1.42 billion, the bridge stands on 5,200 pillars and was entirely designed by Chinese engineers at the Shandong Gausu Group
At least 10,000 workers toiled in two teams around the clock to build the bridge, working from opposite sides of the bay and linking the two ends together in the middle
A staggering 450,000 tons of steel was used in the construction, enough for almost 65 Eiffel Towers, and 2.3 million cubic metres of concrete
Chinese officials said that the bridge will be strong enough to withstand a magnitude 8 earthquake, typhoons or the impact of a 300,000 ton ship. Of the ten longest bridges in the world, seven are in China.
The world's longest bridge outside of Asia is the Lake Pontchartrain Causeway in southern Louisiana, United States. At nearly 24 miles (38km) long, it is the seventh longest bridge in the world.
The longest bridge in the southern hemishpere is the Rio-Niterói Bridge which connects the cities of Rio de Janeiro and Niterói in Brazil. It is 8.25 miles (13,290 m) long.
The Vasco da Gama Bridge is the longest bridge in Europe (including viaducts) at 10.7 miles (17.2 km). It is a cable-stayed bridge flanked by viaducts that spans the Tagus River near Lisbon, Portugal. It is the ninth longest in the world
The longest single-span suspension bridge in the UK is the Humber Estuary bridge. It was completed in 1981 at a length of 1,410 metres and at the time of construction, it was the longest bridge in the world
However, the longest British bridge in its entirety is the Second Severn Crossing, which has a length of roughly 3.2 miles, over twice as long as the Humber Bridge. The Second Severn Crossing carries the M4 motorway over the River Severn between England and Wales. Inaugurated on June 5, 1996 by HRH The Prince of Wales it was built to augment the traffic capacity of the original Severn Bridge built in 1966
The Sutong Yangtze River Bridge is a cable-stayed bridge with the longest main span in the world (1,088 metres (3,570 ft). It spans the Yangtze River in China between Nantong and Changshu
The oldest bridge in the world is the Pons Fabricius or Ponte dei Quattro Capi in Rome, Italy, which was built in 62 BC
The tallest bridge in the world is the Millau Bridge in France. This stunning cable stayed vehicular bridge has one mast reaching a height of 1,125ft
The bridge crosses the valley of the river Tarn near Millau and on cloudy days the bridge appears to almost float on the clouds. It was designed by the English architect Lord Norman Foster, cost £272 million and was entirely privately financed. French President Jacques Chirac called the bridge ‘a miracle of equilibrium’

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